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Spreading myself too thin?

Author
Alvey Motsu
Perkone
Caldari State
#1 - 2013-01-31 11:59:41 UTC
Hi All

I've come to the EVE party a tad late by erm 10 years but worked my way through the whole of the basic and advanced tutorials then basically just done delivery and security missions since as I'm still torn on which way to train up as everything bar PvP appeals.

I'm quite happy to sit and mine all night though not evey night and exploration / salvaging and general PvE works for me too aswell as being intrigued in developing my science and trade sides too but I realise I won't get anywhere fast so to speak.

therefore my question essentially is: does having a jack of all master of non char work longterm or should i look at starting multiple chars to do different things even though only one can be actively training at a time (from what I've read so far)

Dave stark
#2 - 2013-01-31 12:02:31 UTC
i'm going to say do a bit of whatever looks fun while training a solid set of support skills, like the fitting skills, navigation skills, etc. those skills will be useful no matter what you do. by the time you've trained a few of those perhaps you might have a better idea of what you enjoy.
Ovv Topik
Sebiestor Tribe
Minmatar Republic
#3 - 2013-01-31 12:06:01 UTC
This is the wrong forum for this type of Q mate.

ISD will prob move it for you, but in future put Noob Q's here:

https://forums.eveonline.com/default.aspx?g=topics&f=257

"Nicknack, I'm in a shoe in space, on my computer, in my house, with a cup of coffee, in't that something." - Fly Safe PopPaddi. o7

Whitehound
#4 - 2013-01-31 12:09:21 UTC
I do not see an advantage in training each alt separately over training a single character other than using different +attribute implants and attribute remappings for each of the alts. You would then still be training redundant skills such as the core competency skills for each of the alts and therefore spend more training time than with training only one character.

The advantage of using multiple characters comes from placing them at different locations, using anonymity and different names, being with different corporations and alliances, etc.

Loss is meaningful. Therefore is the loss of meaning likewise meaningful. It is the source of all trolling.

Kryss Darkdust
The Skulls
#5 - 2013-01-31 12:15:38 UTC  |  Edited by: Kryss Darkdust
In Eve there are only two categories of players. You are either an Eve Player or you are a victim. People that approach this game with the "I want to avoid PvP" are the most likely people to be in PvP battles and always on the losing end. In essence, every person in Eve who wants to get in a fight is looking for a guy like you.. someone who doesn't want to do it.

I suggest starting off on the right foot. Learn to fly a T1 frigate and learn to do it well. Maximize the potential of that T1 frigate and explore the game for a while. Go to low sec, check out Wormholes, travel out to null sec. Shake the fear of the game, nip the whole "victim" mentality that has already spawned in your gameplay style as soon as humanily possible.

When you are at the point where you are fearless, it won't be because your a bad ass, it will be because you understand the difference between percieved dangers and actual dangers. You'll discover that a Merlin well fitted can take out a battlecruiser. You will learn how to avoid getting ganked and how to not appear as a target. You will learn all sorts of stuff that victims of Eve never learn because they enter the game with exactly your attitude..

"I don't want to do PvP", is the victims modo. The truth is that you won't be given a choice, the only thing you can control is your readiness for these inevitable encounters.

If you think Im wrong, you are choosing the path of the Victim, in which case it doesn't matter what you train or what you do in Eve, because you are ultimatly nothing more than a floating target and what you have will soon belong to someone else. You might as well unsubscribe now because whats the point of spending hours and hours minding, trading and building when you are destined to lose it all when you least expect it.

If however you do this, what you want to do in Eve will become crystal clear and you will know the most and direct path to getting what you want and you will know how to protect your success.

The reality of Eve is that, if you don't love it like it is today, you should probobly go ahead and unsub. 

Clementine Johnson
State War Academy
Caldari State
#6 - 2013-01-31 12:26:39 UTC
I've always had a main that is "jack of all trades" who now (after many years) is pretty good at most of them. The advantage is you can change your mind one day and do something different on a whim, however training time is obviously longer to train multiple directions. I'd suggest you train things to L4 before you move focus, that way you'll be pretty set if when you come back to that direction :)

At the beginning of your Eve life i think it's important to try lots of things in order to find your interests, see what is fun and see how the game works.

I would however, keep hardcore science interests (massive production / invention / research) to a different character, while not vital these skills don't seem to cross over to PVE/PVP too much (there are some exceptions obviously). And these type characters might want to stay in one area more that most, leaving your main character free to move about much more freely.

Scanning/exploration skills can be very useful for both PVE/PVP players
Pak Narhoo
Splinter Foundation
#7 - 2013-01-31 12:47:23 UTC
Found myself stuck with this character trying to do AND industry AND pew pew things after a few months of playing EVE.
Figured out it would take a long long time to be good at anything so I rolled a second character for pew pew, and this one basically does industry with maxed out freighter/JF skills.

There are some skills that overlap but nothing that bothers me, also dual boxing with the pew pew char I can boost myself on different fronts since it has most leaderships skills maxed out.

Training ^that all on 1 character would had taken me way too long.
Alvey Motsu
Perkone
Caldari State
#8 - 2013-01-31 13:23:20 UTC  |  Edited by: Alvey Motsu
Thanks all much appreciated and whilst I appreciate there's no actual wrong way to progress seems others have followed this route too.

I appreciate the comments too on PvP Kryss and understand where you're coming from, I'll certainly learn the skills and fight real people its just not something I'm setting to do each and every time I log in more a case I'm going to find a Corp that suits my time zone and learn as I get to play more.
Ptraci
3 R Corporation
#9 - 2013-01-31 13:39:53 UTC
Alvey Motsu wrote:
Hi All

I've come to the EVE party a tad late by erm 10 years but worked my way through the whole of the basic and advanced tutorials then basically just done delivery and security missions since as I'm still torn on which way to train up as everything bar PvP appeals.

I'm quite happy to sit and mine all night though not evey night and exploration / salvaging and general PvE works for me too aswell as being intrigued in developing my science and trade sides too but I realise I won't get anywhere fast so to speak.

therefore my question essentially is: does having a jack of all master of non char work longterm or should i look at starting multiple chars to do different things even though only one can be actively training at a time (from what I've read so far)



Speaking as someone who has 7 accounts and has played for nigh on 8 years: you don't NEED multiple accounts, however specialization cuts down on training time. There is an overhead for every toon - some skills are pretty standard and needed for everyone. However after that time is "paid", you can branch off your accounts in different directions.

For example I have a carrier pilot. I also have a dread pilot. I have a hictor pilot. I have an ECM/falcon pilot. All of these have max skills, something that would take a single character several years to train for if queuing the skills serially. However since I was able to train them "in parallel" so to speak, then my total training time for each specialization has been cut to less than a year. And this allows me to have a great deal of fun, since I am much more flexible. When I get bored of carrier ratting I go bubble some poor soul's supercarrier, or I go ECM people and make them QQ in small gang fights. Etc.

Of course you said you don't like PvP, but the same applies to industry.