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EVE New Citizens Q&A

 
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Advice to a new player?

Author
Rose Frost
Vow of Vengeance
Stella Nova
#1 - 2017-07-29 12:15:17 UTC
As this is my first post, I would like to say hello to this rather unique community(more on that later :P)

Then, no matter what I write, it's not a rant, but rather a call for help from a disoriented and lost player :/

So, let's get started:
I began playing EVE a couple of days ago and since then, even though I did play a fair amount of time, the time spent playing was only about 30% of the time invested into EVE, everything else went into reading. FAQs, guides, tutorials, you name it. As most of new players, probably, I noticed that Alphas are severly limited, and as some, I heard about possible ways to make enough ISK to PLEX your account. Now, so far so good, but I ran into a couple of problems:

First of all, is it reasonable to start thinking about it already, when I didn't even get to the limitations of my alpha? I could spend another 2-3 weeks probably learning all alpha skills and the game mechanics and all there is to know.

Next, most of the guides are quite old, some of them are more than 5 years old, and back then, at least from what I know, the ingame price for PLEX was significantly lower, not to mention all the updates that must have come out in the meantime ... so I was wondering, how much of what is written in these guides still holds true?

Basically, from my understanding, you have these possibilities to make money:

1. Mining
2. Exploration
3. Missions
4. Ratting
5. PvP

Seems quite a lot. So, at first I thought, I'd do mining, since I could do sth else while my venture keeps collecting ressources. Now, according to this:
[url]https://levelskip.com/mmorpgs/How-to-make-money-in-Eve-Online[/url]
you could make several millions per hour and if I make the math for my venture (about 900k per load, 10-15mins to fill it up), it seems to work out decently. Now, I have a couple of problems with that: 1. Even in 0.8, you will have pirates attacking you after 2-3 minutes. Well, ok, get some Hobogblins, a medium shield, you're fine. Except I have the luck to always encounter some Despoilers/Saboteurs who jam me non-stop, so as long as they're alive, I can't mine. That's about +1 minute for each mining run.

More importantly however, it's not like you fly into the next asteroid belt, target the asteroid and you can go take a nap. It's more like fly into one belt and find it empty, repeat previous step about 20 times, find one that is crowded AF, repeat that about 10 times, finally find one that you can mine and find that the asteroids deplete instantly (Pyroxeres and Plagioclase) and repeat thi step about 20 times again. Depending on how many systems you have to visit you can easily get up to 20 minutes of travelling only. That turns a 10 min run into a 30-35 min run, but this is something that nt a single guide ever mentions.

So, mining was boring, but not calm enough that I could just do something else in the meantime. So I thought, let's do explorations. In the words of MandaloreGaming "Exploration is good because unlike most other activities you need a brain to do it well". Could be something for me, couldn't it?

This guy:
[url]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVgVbtW9smQ&t=1105s[/url]
Made it seem quite easy. Then I logged in, and went out to find wormholes. Now, first, it takes you about 15 minutes to find a good system without too many people in it(more people = higher chance someone might follow you), then you jump into the wormhole and you find about 2 Data/Relic sites per hole, and all of them are sleeper sites. I found 24 sites in total so far and not a single pirate site. Thugh life, bitches ... Let's sum up: About 2 hours and I made exactly 0 ISK. Well, that was easy.

HiSec sites yield about 100k-1mil ISK and theyre easier to find, but HiSec is so crowded, you will always find at least 2 other people in the site that you just scanned down. So statistically, 1 in 3 times you will get nothing, which results in about 66k-700k per site, so assuming you find 2 sites per hour, you get 120k-1.4mil per hour. That's OK, but nowhere near enough to even dream about PLEXing.

LowSec is almost as crowded as HiSec, but unlike HiSec everyone here seems to want to kill you like there is no tomorrow. The loot is a little bit better, I fould 2-5mil in the sites, so technically you could do about 10 mil per hour. The problem with this calculation is that it assumes a) that you will not lose your ship, and b) that you will be able to complete every site you encounter.

Now, first, you WILL lose ships. Bookmarking locations in empty space is nice, but if you want to explore you will have to visit those sites, and after that you will have to jump through a gate, both locations that are easy to access. And sadly, being cautious or fast is not enough. An alpha-heron fitted for exploration is often times a one-hit for the monstrosities that are hunting newbs like me. And suddenly you're down 1.5mil.

But even if you make it out of a gank alive, there's no guarantee you will make money. If you're about to loot your container and someone jumps you, you GTFO and you live but you gained nothing, you just lost time. Or if you ****** up the minigame, which happens from time to time especially as an alpha, since you dont have all the fancy stuff that Omegas benefit from.

There's probably no numbers on this, but a safe estimate would be abut 1-2mil per hour in LoSec if I had to guess. Together with the stress level it's not worth it at all and same goes for mining there.

500 characters remaining, I wont make it, so I will add another post just below.
Rose Frost
Vow of Vengeance
Stella Nova
#2 - 2017-07-29 12:27:42 UTC
We're stuck with NullSec then. And yeah, I can get 30 mil from one site, but there's also a couple of problems with that. First, you have to get there. Either you fly about 30 minutes from your trade hub to NullSec, get killed 10 times at a gatecamp until you make ith through be sheer luck, or you look for a Wormhole. And boy, does this take long. You can spend literally a whole day looking for wormholes and you will not find one entry. I found more C6 WHs that NullSec entries which is quite depressing. But once you get there, you're a rich man, right?

Well, except you find only **** in the first area, a gatecamp in the second area, and 2 lvl 5 sites in the third area. In a heron with Sister core probes a rangefinding array etc. and even an implant for scanning accuracy I don't get over 86 scan strength and that is not nearly enough for lvl5. Thugh life, once again.

I wanted to do PvP then. But people ingame told me that alphas are prety much the suicide guys that the Omegas use as cannon fodder so that they can make their profit. The first thought was: Why would an alpha be that stupid? Quickly followed by: What's the point for me to do it then?

But is that even correct? What can an alpha do in PvP? The statements from various people are quite conflicting.

Suddenly the list shrinked down to ratting and missions. Now, while the lvl1 missions can yield up to 500k and it usually takes about 5-10 minutes to do them, it's not bad. Plus, military missions also allow you to get some bounties. In fact, it seems a quite stable income but nowhere near to the promised exploration rewards.
Ratting on the other hand yields no income at all. HIgher than 0.5 there is nothing to do, 0.5 has some cruisers, but every time you warp in there with what you can fly as an alpha, someone comes with his battleship or t3 cruiser and onehits everything. And lower is LowSec where you get dismantled INSTANTLY when you show up. Well, I don't have 20 friends avalaible at all time to feel kind-of safe when Im ratting, so I have to do it alone, more or less (Well ,maybe with 3 people)

So, why am I writing all this?

Because I don't want generic answers that everyone with half a brain can look up in the internet or learn in the tutorial. I'm not looking for some miraculous formula that solves all my problems. I just want you to tell me:

1. Am I rushing things too much?

2. Are my observations correct or is it just a matter of bad luck that should not discourage me?

3. Is the goal of PLEXing realistic?

ty in advance.
DeMichael Crimson
Republic University
Minmatar Republic
#3 - 2017-07-29 13:39:45 UTC
Nice write up and welcome to Eve.

Probably your biggest mistake is trying to do all those things in systems that have a lot of people in them. I suggest getting away from major travel routes / mission hubs and go check out dead end cul-de-sac / pipeline systems. You can view them in the Star Map and check their stats for amount of population, amount of jumps, amount of ship kills, etc.

Rose Frost wrote:

So, why am I writing all this?

Because I don't want generic answers that everyone with half a brain can look up in the internet or learn in the tutorial. I'm not looking for some miraculous formula that solves all my problems. I just want you to tell me:

1. Am I rushing things too much?

2. Are my observations correct or is it just a matter of bad luck that should not discourage me?

3. Is the goal of PLEXing realistic?

ty in advance.

This game takes time to not only learn the basics of what's available, it also takes time to develop your character so yeah, I think you're rushing it.

As for your observations, you're partly right and you just might have had a bad run of luck, probably from rushing it. Definitely don't get discouraged, just decide what career path you actually want to do and then specialize in it before moving onto another career path.

PLEX, in my opinion, isn't a good goal to set for a young character. There's way too many other items needed to develop your character and the ISK spent on PLEX for Omega game time would be better suited in purchasing those items. Eve Online is a game where you're suppose to have fun, not work and worry about making ISK to purchase PLEX for game time.

I suggest paying a subscription so you can then spend your ISK on the other items needed to advance and develop your character. After your character is established and making ISK profit, then you can purchase PLEX with ISK for game time..

Anyway, I hope you stick with Eve and have a long rewarding career.


DMC
Rose Frost
Vow of Vengeance
Stella Nova
#4 - 2017-07-29 13:51:05 UTC
Thanks for the reply.

I'm not saying I wanna PLEX ASAP or sth like this. Obviously, it makes sense learning all you can do as an alpha before progressing further and that's also what I wanna do, but I like to plan ahead.
Every game I play, I ask myself: What do I play it for? What do I want to achieve?
When I started DOTA, I also said to myself: My goal is 6k MMR. I knew it would take me about 2k hours invested if not more, but I did it anyways. Same with EVE ... I think :/
Donnachadh
United Allegiance of Undesirables
#5 - 2017-07-29 14:05:38 UTC
Rose Frost wrote:


1. Am I rushing things too much?

2. Are my observations correct or is it just a matter of bad luck that should not discourage me?

3. Is the goal of PLEXing realistic?

1 - To be brutally honest here the basic answer is yes you are rushing things. EvE has a huge learning curve compared to other games and my personal opinion is that it will take you several months to get a basic grasp of what there is to do and which of those activities best suits what you want from the game of EvE. My advice for now is to sit back, forget that plex(at least for now), explore around to see what you like and find a good area to do it in, talk to people in game, and most importantly have fun. Then worry about that plex.

2. A little of both I think.
Luck has a role to play in your adventures in EvE, let's take hacking sites as an example. They spawn at downtime and stay in place until someone clears them. After they are cleared a timer starts at the end they re-spawn. If you are lucky you hit these sites after they re-spawn but before anyone else can find them.
On other hand some of your observations like people in low sec wanting to kill you are spot on.
Again just putting time into the game and experimenting with what there is and in others areas will help.

3. Depends on your interpretation. to me the real question is are you having fun?
If you are having fun while trying to earn sufficient ISK to buy a plex then your goal is realistic.
On the other hand if every time you log into the game to play you are spending all of your time grinding to earn ISK but not having much fun then you have unreasonable expectations.

In the end this is a game and you should play it for fun, not to try and plex an account.
If you cannot afford to pay a monthly sub and still want to play EvE then nul sec is your best / easiest option to make the ISK required to plex every month but that comes with some penalties as well which leads us back to the forget the plex for not, get out and explore all that EvE is and see what you want to do and where you want to do it.

Mining is still one of the easiest ways for new characters to make some ISK. There are systems in high sec that are empty or have very few character in them, I suggest you find one and park your Venture there. No mining especially in high sec will not make you space rich, but mining as a part of what you do in EvE can provide you with a steady income, income you can then use to explore other avenues of making ISK.
Rose Frost
Vow of Vengeance
Stella Nova
#6 - 2017-07-29 14:23:10 UTC
Thanks man!

Please be brutally honest, I don't take this as criticism, but as an opportunity to modify my goals and my view on the game.

And yes, my objective is to have fun, first and foremost. And so far I live very happily as an Alpha (except I get my new Moa disintegrated once in a while :D ), sometimes exploring, sometimes mining, sometimes killing innocent rats. But I don't really want to specialize on one thing if I can avoid it, because I think that is what makes Eve so special: The sheer amount of possibilities. If I wanted to kill NPCs 24/7, I would play Call of Duty, if I wanted to mine all the time, I would be playing Minecraft ;)
Donnachadh
United Allegiance of Undesirables
#7 - 2017-07-29 14:29:04 UTC
Rose Frost wrote:
Thanks man!

Please be brutally honest, I don't take this as criticism, but as an opportunity to modify my goals and my view on the game.

And yes, my objective is to have fun, first and foremost. And so far I live very happily as an Alpha (except I get my new Moa disintegrated once in a while :D ), sometimes exploring, sometimes mining, sometimes killing innocent rats. But I don't really want to specialize on one thing if I can avoid it, because I think that is what makes Eve so special: The sheer amount of possibilities. If I wanted to kill NPCs 24/7, I would play Call of Duty, if I wanted to mine all the time, I would be playing Minecraft ;)

If you do not want to specialize in one aspect of EvE and like me want to experiment, explore and do whatever you want to do at the moment it may be hard to make enough ISK to reliably plex your account even as an Omega. I know for me I always find something else I want to do competing with the time needed to grind for a plex, so in the end I simply gave up and gladly pay my subs every month just so I can do what I want, when I want to do it.
Kosoku
3Ra Syndicate
#8 - 2017-07-29 14:40:26 UTC
500 plex is around 1.5 billion isk. For a new player, I'd say no. It's not impossible but you will burn out.

While no guides may mention it, NPC item trading is also a way to make money. All you need is a basic cargo hauler which is less than a million and few millions isk of basic startup cost.
How to do that is simple. For an example, antibiotics. If you study where it sells and where it is being purchased, you will see that there is a small margin of profit. The margin is small but you combat that with volume. You can do this with all commodities.
Each trip will probably earn you less than 20,000 isk at the start but it's a way to earn isk.

Above was how I began back in 2003. I traded NPC station items: buy low & sell high.
Rose Frost
Vow of Vengeance
Stella Nova
#9 - 2017-07-29 14:44:20 UTC
Yea, I heard of this way, too. But how did MandaloreGaming put it in his Eve review? "This is for people who like Truck simulator" :D
To be honest, I would not like to spend my free time like that :)
DeMichael Crimson
Republic University
Minmatar Republic
#10 - 2017-07-29 14:45:16 UTC
Donnachadh wrote:
I know for me I always find something else I want to do competing with the time needed to grind for a plex, so in the end I simply gave up and gladly pay my subs every month just so I can do what I want, when I want to do it.

That"s exactly what I do.

I buy the yearly sub which equals out to less than $10 a month. Very cheap price to pay for hours and hours of fun.



DMC
Kosoku
3Ra Syndicate
#11 - 2017-07-29 14:54:27 UTC
Rose Frost wrote:
Yea, I heard of this way, too. But how did MandaloreGaming put it in his Eve review? "This is for people who like Truck simulator" :D
To be honest, I would not like to spend my free time like that :)


Each to their own.

The trading will make you read a lot and you will eventually dive into NPC corp lore. And you may find yourself stories behind each NPC corp which is interesting by itself.
This game has 14 years of history in it. Most of it is buried but available.

You can also simply roam around and look for readily discovered sites where you can destroy hostile NPCs for bounties.
DeMichael Crimson
Republic University
Minmatar Republic
#12 - 2017-07-29 14:59:16 UTC
Rose Frost wrote:
Yea, I heard of this way, too. But how did MandaloreGaming put it in his Eve review? "This is for people who like Truck simulator" :D
To be honest, I would not like to spend my free time like that :)

It seems to me you're letting those reviews sway your judgement, especially since they're just based on opinions. I have friends in Eve who started the same way and have built up a career in trading with a net worth over hundreds of billions ISK.

Granted trading isn't for everyone, especially me, but don't count it out as a way to create a large profit of ISK in-game. Anyway, main thing to remember is to just have fun.


DMC
Rose Frost
Vow of Vengeance
Stella Nova
#13 - 2017-07-29 15:02:35 UTC
DeMichael Crimson wrote:
Rose Frost wrote:
Yea, I heard of this way, too. But how did MandaloreGaming put it in his Eve review? "This is for people who like Truck simulator" :D
To be honest, I would not like to spend my free time like that :)

It seems to me you're letting those reviews sway your judgement, especially since they're just based on opinions. I have friends in Eve who started the same way and have built up a career in trading with a net worth over hundreds of billions ISK.

Granted trading isn't for everyone, especially me, but don't count it out as a way to create a large profit of ISK in-game. Anyway, main thing to remember is to just have fun.


DMC


As for the reviews, nah, I'm only quoting them where they find better words to portray something than I do.

and youre right, main thing is to have fun. And I simply cannot imagine myself having fun with ferrying around goods from one trade-hub to the next.
Kosoku
3Ra Syndicate
#14 - 2017-07-29 15:12:48 UTC
Nope, there is no fun in cargo hauling. I never did it for long but I did it as a safe way to make my foundation of Eve career.

That's why you read during. The game has loads of materials to read in-game. Every item has a rather long description and also lists its variants (T2, faction items). NPC corps have their histories you can read. Ship descriptions as well. You can also browse the market for rare items or other items you want to take an advantage of.

You don't just watch your screen waiting for your cargo hauler to make jump. You do other things during.
Rose Frost
Vow of Vengeance
Stella Nova
#15 - 2017-07-29 15:53:39 UTC
Well, positive mental attitude pays out it seems.
Found my first pirate site in WH space, got 17 mil out of it and didn't die Big smile

You were right about not getting discouraged too fast Ugh
ergherhdfgh
Imperial Academy
Amarr Empire
#16 - 2017-07-30 02:52:52 UTC
To be upfront and honest I did not read the entire text wall. I glanced over so if my response is not 100% fitting I apologize in advance for my laziness of not reading the entire thing. However in my defense you did say that you were looking for more generic advice and I feel I've read enough to fulfill that request.

To start off this is a game and as such fun should be your goal IMHO. To me if you set paying for game time with in game money as a goal then by definition you are changing the game into a job and thereby changing play into work.

Eve is a subscription based game and I hope that it always stays that way. To me you should always plan to pay for the game with real life money. If you ever find yourself with more isk than you know what to do with then sure buy some PLEX and pay for game time to save yourself some money here and there. Just don't turn the game into a job by setting that as a goal.

As far as making isk in this game with various professions goes:

With mining it is fairly easy to figure out what your potential income is or potential max income. With anything else it's not that simple. The more you learn about this game the more isk you will be able to make. There are tricks to every profession and as you pick them up or figure them out you'll make more and more isk.

For example when missioning the mission isk payout is typically your lowest reward from a given mission. Bounties from killing rats while running the mission are usually far greater than the mission reward and mission LP payouts typically are worth more than the isk reward and bounty payouts combined.

I've heard some people claim that a 4 month old character can earn as much as 200 million isk per hour running mission if done properly. I'm not saying that you should set that as a goal I am just giving this as an example of how your personal knowledge of the game will help you more than any skills or modules that your character or ship has in game.
Rose Frost wrote:

I wanted to do PvP then. But people ingame told me that alphas are prety much the suicide guys that the Omegas use as cannon fodder so that they can make their profit. The first thought was: Why would an alpha be that stupid? Quickly followed by: What's the point for me to do it then?

But is that even correct? What can an alpha do in PvP? The statements from various people are quite conflicting.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=de1hwoFYA_k&t=

So the above link is of an experienced vet playing on a days old character. This was before alpha clones existed but the premise and facts of this video are still true and largely current. My main point in linking this video and I believe the main point of the pilot making the video ( Suitonia ) is that success in PvP in Eve is mostly what you as a player know and not so much the skill points of your character nor the isk value of what you are flying.

Eve is a sandbox and not a linear themepark style MMO. As a result there is no set path through the game and no inherent progression. Success in this game is very subjective and largely dependent upon your goals which are extremely personal.

So one example of the above would be that in this game the most watched PvP statistic is kill efficiency. This is the ratio of the isk value of ships lost versus the isk value of ships destroyed. As a result if you are PvPing in 3 Million isk ships and loose 99 of them in PvP but on the 100th encounter you wind up blowing up a 300 million isk ship ( which is totally possible ) then you would have a positive kill efficiency and be able to call yourself successful.

Another point to be made here is that early in your Eve career you will likely loose a lot of ships before you get your first win. Your goal early on should not be to win each engagement but to learn as much as possible from each loss. You can't really learn anything from a win and need to loose to become experienced and good. So you should not judge yourself negatively for loosing. You should only ever feel at a loss if you failed to grow from the experience.

Another thing to keep in mind with Eve PvP is that it is not balanced and bigger is not better just different. PvP in Eve is more about match ups and counters than it is a brawl between evenly balanced classes like in other games. Every ship in this game has some ships which have a distinct advantage over it while other where it has the advantage even within the same class. What I mean by this is that there is no "best PvP frigate" in this game. Instead each combat frigate has situations where it is likely to win as well as situations where it is likely to loose.

The keys to winning PvP engagements in Eve has a lot to do with knowing when to run and when to fight as well as having tricks up your sleeve and playing your cards close to your chest. In other words meta game is a huge part Eve PvP.


Want to talk? Join Cara's channel in game: House Forelli

Rose Frost
Vow of Vengeance
Stella Nova
#17 - 2017-07-30 08:02:44 UTC
Wow, you sure did take your time here :)

Thanks for the link.

Also, that was not really what I meant by Alphas just being plain useless in fights. My point was rather that the smaller your ship and the worse your equipment the worse your chances of survival in general. Sure, you can offset that to some degree with pure skill, but that applies more to a 1v1 situation than a cluttered fight. Also, check this out:
[url]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=voDWU5fmVP0[/url]
Now if that would be me in a Heron, I would have died instantly.
Also, since I'm a new player it is very unlikely for me to outskill anyone that will try to kill me.

Which brings up a question: How can you train that? Eve has only a handful flight options like "Approach", "Orbit", etc. and the weapons system is quite simple: Lock target, get in range and you hit him. It's not like I can dodge bullets or sth :/ So the main skill to survive is hit that MWD as fast as humanly possible?
ergherhdfgh
Imperial Academy
Amarr Empire
#18 - 2017-07-30 12:44:02 UTC
The fact that he had a faction ship and deadspace mods obviously helped him but through his narration you can hear that there were a lot of mistakes made by the attackers and that his non-standard fit had a lot to do with how things turned out.

The bubbles that they were throwing up helped him by locking down their fleet mates while is drones automatically attacked target after target. You hear the surprise in his voice because many of his kills came while he was jammed. It also took them a long time before they even started attacking his drones.

That being said he did a really good job of staying cool and confident under pressure. He had excellent drone management and did a good job of overheating without burning stuff out.

He also called it ahead of time that it was a trap and that the original ship which he engaged was bait but like a corp mate of mine once said "some bait is just too good not to bite at".

The attackers depended on that curse neuting him and his batteries helped to counter that. Before the somewhat recent changes to cap batteries when a curse showed up on the field you were basically screwed. Yes there were cap charges but they could run you out of them as they were very bulky and you could not carry all that many. So I think his batteries really surprised them.

All in all that guy had a great fit which they were not expecting and a good amount of skill and a lot of game knowledge. Without his skill and game knowledge, which caused him to fit the ship that way, he would have lost his expensive deadspace fit faction ship.

You can't just trow any inexperienced new player into a high skill point character in an expensive ship and have them win. Inexperienced people in expensive ships loose every time. However as you can see from the suitonia link experienced players can win in cheap ships when out numbered by higher skill point characters in more expensive T2 ships. That is why I say that experience and player skill is far more important than skill points and blingy fits.

That being said a bunch of inexperienced newer players in cheaper ships can swarm, outnumber, and overcome more experienced players.

This all keeps coming back to my main point which is to just play the game and have fun and not worry too much about the losses. Learn from each engagement and you'll become an experienced vet soon enough.

Want to talk? Join Cara's channel in game: House Forelli

Cyadra
Pator Tech School
Minmatar Republic
#19 - 2017-07-30 15:10:47 UTC
What I find hysterical is people write answers to questions for newbies, expecting newbies to know what they are talking about. I bet you the OP has no clue about some of the answers people have given at all..Lol
Kosoku
3Ra Syndicate
#20 - 2017-07-30 17:06:47 UTC  |  Edited by: Kosoku
Eve is sandbox. You do whatever you want. That's pretty much all you need.

Let me tell you how I began though.

I began in 2003 and started out as a low sec miner. Since the game was new, there was no gankers. Everyone was busy amassing wealth. I've come from Ultima online, so PvP was second nature to me, but I was never really an adrenaline junkie. I did not seek out fights and moved to high sec soon after it became apparent that low sec was becoming dangerous.

And then I turned to NPC item trading. I used my savings from low sec mining and started to buy low and sell high. My goal was buying a cruiser blueprint. Met like-minded people and formed a corporation.
This was probably my best years in Eve. We mined and sold cruisers for nice profit. (yes, T1 cruisers. But they were rare at that time.)

Left the corp eventually and began trading again. This time, I dealt with player-made items. But the concept was still the same. Buy low and sell high. Find undercutting players, get their items for cheap and sell them elsewhere for a margin.
This was the point I made an alt and let him join a null sec corp for PvP and the riches of null.

Some years later, T2 BPO craze began. That was a defining moment for me in Eve. I started to buy and sell T2 BPOs for profit. I made nice ISK from this. (Buy a T2 BPO for 500m and selling for 1B and so on.)

And, at one point, CCP announced that they were ditching T2 BPO lottery system. People feared CCP might turn T2 BPOs into T2 BPCs. People sold, I bought, gambling that CCP would keep T2 BPO as is.

I won the gamble and kept T2 BPOs as long as I wanted before cashing out. I did keep some I liked personally (like Cerberus bpo and drone bpo)

Eventually got tired of the game and I had an inactive period of 3 years from 2014 to 2017.


Now that I wrote down what I did in Eve, I was a trader through and through.

Eve is sandbox. You do what you want and so did I.
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