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Out of Pod Experience

 
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Has it always been this bad?

Author
Kitty Bear
Deep Core Mining Inc.
Caldari State
#61 - 2014-06-06 11:09:13 UTC
we occasionally get headlines along the lines of "worst level of violence ever"
whilst firearms are illegal in the UK, criminals, oddly, don't really pay all that much attention to that particular law
so we get a few shootings every now and then, and a bunch of stabbings a bit more frequently and beer fuelled fist fights every week end

when you look at the facts behind the sensationalist headlines and actually compare a modern society to it's historical counterpart then you notice that todays level of violence (at least in "western cultures") is significantly lower than it was in past periods.

we live in the information age
data and events from the opposite side of the planet can be in front of you & ready to read in as little as a few minutes

bad news sells better than good news
so the press focus on the profitable information, and thus the impression of a global decline into barbarity might become believable


Slade Trillgon
Brutor Force Federated
#62 - 2014-06-06 14:25:59 UTC
Sibyyl wrote:
I guess it's all a matter of perspective.

The Crusades were well known for barbarism. Two of its worst moments were 1) right near the beginning when less militarily experienced crusaders got impatient and started attacking and looting Christian settlements before they even got to Jerusalem, committing terrible atrocities, and 2) around 1212 when a sizable force of French and German poor and children were given free passage to go liberate Jersusalem, only to be sold en masse into slavery in Tunisia and other Venetian hubs.

The activities of the Dutch in Africa are quite horrific. Not to mention the atrocities of African dictatorships committed on their own people. The latter is hardly a recent development.

The innumerable atrocities committed by Japan on most of Asia. My own grandmother spent years disguised as a boy to avoid the attention (to put it lightly) of Japanese soldiers in her country.

Take a look at disease, field medicine, and war casualties during the American Civil War.

These are just random examples. I think it is characteristically human to be savages to each other. It is also characteristically human to be kind.



There are many sociologists the theorize that early man was actually quite hospitable and open to unkknown individuals as they saw the opportunities to learn from each other. Then we settled down, learned about agriculture and quickly societies grew. At which point conflict over resources became the norm.
Eurydia Vespasian
Storm Hunters
#63 - 2014-06-06 14:54:50 UTC
Slade Trillgon wrote:
Sibyyl wrote:
I guess it's all a matter of perspective.

The Crusades were well known for barbarism. Two of its worst moments were 1) right near the beginning when less militarily experienced crusaders got impatient and started attacking and looting Christian settlements before they even got to Jerusalem, committing terrible atrocities, and 2) around 1212 when a sizable force of French and German poor and children were given free passage to go liberate Jersusalem, only to be sold en masse into slavery in Tunisia and other Venetian hubs.

The activities of the Dutch in Africa are quite horrific. Not to mention the atrocities of African dictatorships committed on their own people. The latter is hardly a recent development.

The innumerable atrocities committed by Japan on most of Asia. My own grandmother spent years disguised as a boy to avoid the attention (to put it lightly) of Japanese soldiers in her country.

Take a look at disease, field medicine, and war casualties during the American Civil War.

These are just random examples. I think it is characteristically human to be savages to each other. It is also characteristically human to be kind.



There are many sociologists the theorize that early man was actually quite hospitable and open to unkknown individuals as they saw the opportunities to learn from each other. Then we settled down, learned about agriculture and quickly societies grew. At which point conflict over resources became the norm.


I read some novels in high school that I thought were odd, yet strangely apt take on the human condition. They were called "Ishmael""The Story of B." and "My Ishmael". They are told primarily through the eyes of a sentient, telepathic lowland gorilla. Sounds odd but it really worked as an awesome commentary on humanity.
Kijo Rikki
Perkone
Caldari State
#64 - 2014-06-06 15:17:29 UTC
News travels alot faster these days, and because of 24 hour news networks that struggle to deliver content and the degeneracy of "selling the news" has made it seem as if the world is going to hell when not much has really changed.

Just 25 years ago we celebrated the fall of the Berlin wall and a signal to "the end" of the cold war. Now we seem to be entering a new period of unrest in the world but there have always been periods of unrest throughout history, the speed of information just brings all of it to your attention instantly.

While looking for something to debate with I found this interesting. The first recorded instance of airline terrorism. Enjoy.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1933_United_Airlines_Boeing_247_mid-air_explosion

You make a valid point, good Sir or Madam. 

Krixtal Icefluxor
INLAND EMPIRE Galactic
#65 - 2014-06-06 15:53:11 UTC
"Back then" humanity did not have the power to make the Earth uninhabitable.

Now we do.

Just one slight little mistake somewhere...............

"He has mounted his hind-legs, and blown crass vapidities through the bowel of his neck."  - Ambrose Bierce on Oscar Wilde's Lecture in San Francisco 1882