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Is some of CCP getting the big CHILL???

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Serene Repose
#41 - 2014-01-31 09:37:56 UTC  |  Edited by: Serene Repose
You ain't lived till you've "gotten used to tornados." Ice is so infrequent, or has been so in the past, buying all-weather tires isn't something one would do. Neither would one buy a bag of driveway salt, or keep a wide, scoopy shovel. This kid I knew had a snowsled hanging on the garage wall, next to it a pair of ice skates - both rusting. We wouldn't say anything but we all wondered what it'd be like to use things like that.

As far as complaining about the cold. We don't. Our lips turn blue and our teeth just sort of chatter. I do have a fireplace. It's not like we don't get winter at all. When things get out of hand, I just light that up, make some hot cocoa, grab a good book and read from beneath a large, fuzzy blanket. Call in sick, if they haven't closed the roads, and wait it out.

No sense in being prepared for something that happens once in a blue moon. Far more practical to invest in your tornado escape kit and be glad you only get those, instead of having to scrape ice off your windshield every morning pretending you LIKE it! Yes. You can get used to tornados. I could never get used to blue lips.

We must accommodate the idiocracy.

Kagura Nikon
Native Freshfood
Minmatar Republic
#42 - 2014-01-31 09:47:12 UTC
Serene Repose wrote:
Did you know CCP has offices in the Atlanta Metro area? (Kennesaw - Stone Mountain) Did you know Atlanta is frozen solid today??? Oh my goodness! I-285 is a traffic jammed block of ice! Some of CCP's employees may be out there freezin' their hinies off!

Remember guys: It's not called Hot'lanta for nothin'. Sure, it's not that hot today! But, you'll thaw out - guaranteed.

"Our" sympathies are with you.

(From a former Atlanta resident of 16 years. Now in South Florida where it'll hit 80 degrees today!)



while htat.. here in south of brazil we have 40C degrees at 6 am .. for the IS challanged that is 104 F

"If brute force does not solve your problem....  then you are  surely not using enough!"

Kagura Nikon
Native Freshfood
Minmatar Republic
#43 - 2014-01-31 09:52:10 UTC
Kerrec Snowmane wrote:
Baljos Arnjak wrote:
You gotta love it when you go outside and the moisture in your nose freezes 10 seconds after leaving the door!


If I go outside, take a deep breath and my nostrils freeze shut, then I know it's time to put on a winter jacket.

This thread reminds me of a trip to Bermuda I made over Xmas holidays several years ago. It was a beautiful 20 deg. C so we went swimming in the ocean. The locals were walking their dogs on the beach and wearing big down filled jackets...

But yeah, someone from Atlanta probably doesn't know what an "all season" tire is, let alone a "winter" tire. Add some ice on the road and I get it, not hard to understand they aren't prepared for that kind of situation at all.

As for me, the snowbank I made by shovelling my driveway was already 6 feet high in early December. I'd be more than willing to trade with Atlanta. You can have the slow moving plow trucks throwing down dirty sand or corroding salt, the swapping of winter tires, the shovels or snowblowers, the scrapers, the constant filling of windshield washer fluid in exchange for one or two days of icy roads. Please. :)



On the other hand.. du you think you can survive walking in the sun at near 50C (120f) temperatures with zero wind and 90% air humidity? you know... when the sun is so hot that its simply incidence on the roof of the house, over the water storage make the water of your bath come boiling from the shower?

"If brute force does not solve your problem....  then you are  surely not using enough!"

Alastair Ormand
Mine all the things
#44 - 2014-01-31 09:53:38 UTC  |  Edited by: Alastair Ormand
Meanwhile in Australia *Cooks egg on sheet of tin left in sun*.

Its about 105-110 F here.
40-45 degrees Celcius 7 days in a row. I work in a big warehouse, spare a thought for the suffering I will endure

Edit: Oh already posts about Aussie land :(

I discourage running with scissors.

Serene Repose
#45 - 2014-01-31 10:07:28 UTC
Alastair Ormand wrote:
Meanwhile in Australia *Cooks egg on sheet of tin left in sun*.

Its about 105-110 F here.
40-45 degrees Celcius 7 days in a row. I work in a big warehouse, spare a thought for the suffering I will endure

Edit: Oh already posts about Aussie land :(
OMG yes! The Australian Open was just held. Tennis shoes melting to the court surface. Several players passing out from heat prostration. The countryside around spontaneously erupting in flames. That is really something down your way. My sympathies there from the other end of the thermometer!

We must accommodate the idiocracy.

Alastair Ormand
Mine all the things
#46 - 2014-01-31 10:14:46 UTC
Serene Repose wrote:
Alastair Ormand wrote:
Meanwhile in Australia *Cooks egg on sheet of tin left in sun*.

Its about 105-110 F here.
40-45 degrees Celcius 7 days in a row. I work in a big warehouse, spare a thought for the suffering I will endure

Edit: Oh already posts about Aussie land :(
OMG yes! The Australian Open was just held. Tennis shoes melting to the court surface. Several players passing out from heat prostration. The countryside around spontaneously erupting in flames. That is really something down your way. My sympathies there from the other end of the thermometer!


<3 Thanks

I discourage running with scissors.

Kagura Nikon
Native Freshfood
Minmatar Republic
#47 - 2014-01-31 10:26:26 UTC
I am selling heat. I will pack and send 10 Mega Joules of heat directly from South America for 1 plex + mailing costs.

"If brute force does not solve your problem....  then you are  surely not using enough!"

Tarpedo
Incursionista
#48 - 2014-01-31 11:33:35 UTC
Global warming is actually very cold. I wonder how cold will be global freezing? -1000C?
Doc Severide
Caldari Provisions
Caldari State
#49 - 2014-01-31 11:37:26 UTC  |  Edited by: Doc Severide
Bah...

Come spend a winter in Western Canada where you can sit at -40 for weeks in a row. I've seen storms that covered an entire side of a houe that was facing the wind. The owners had to create a tunnel from the door to get out, the kids went on the roof to toboggon down... By buddies 12 year od sister died 6 feet from the back door of the house when she fell in the snow and couldn't get up... It's brutal...
Kagura Nikon
Native Freshfood
Minmatar Republic
#50 - 2014-01-31 13:01:28 UTC
Tarpedo wrote:
Global warming is actually very cold. I wonder how cold will be global freezing? -1000C?


No its not... here temperatures are the highest in 115 years. Just in case you are not trolling global warmign is the average world temeprateure not the temperature where you live, and the more extreme temperature son both ends are supposedly related to the resulting unbalance in atmosphere.

"If brute force does not solve your problem....  then you are  surely not using enough!"

Kerrec Snowmane
Nobody in Local
Of Sound Mind
#51 - 2014-01-31 13:11:55 UTC
Kagura Nikon wrote:
On the other hand.. du you think you can survive walking in the sun at near 50C (120f) temperatures with zero wind and 90% air humidity? you know... when the sun is so hot that its simply incidence on the roof of the house, over the water storage make the water of your bath come boiling from the shower?


It's always greener on the other side. I mountain bike in the summers (our summers). It gets plenty humid here too, but when the thermometer reaches 35 deg. C, I'm pretty much done. My body can't handle it.

I could probably get used to it, but it doesn't happen often enough for me to say "F&&k it, I'm going riding anyway!".
Kagura Nikon
Native Freshfood
Minmatar Republic
#52 - 2014-01-31 13:21:57 UTC
Kerrec Snowmane wrote:
Kagura Nikon wrote:
On the other hand.. du you think you can survive walking in the sun at near 50C (120f) temperatures with zero wind and 90% air humidity? you know... when the sun is so hot that its simply incidence on the roof of the house, over the water storage make the water of your bath come boiling from the shower?


It's always greener on the other side. I mountain bike in the summers (our summers). It gets plenty humid here too, but when the thermometer reaches 35 deg. C, I'm pretty much done. My body can't handle it.

I could probably get used to it, but it doesn't happen often enough for me to say "F&&k it, I'm going riding anyway!".

I lived in south germany for a while, the colder I faces was -24c.. but I felt that at least I coudl do somethign about the cold.. put more clothes.. move.. etc.. But when temperature goes above yoru body temperature you feel like you cannot do anything about it.. and that is what i hate. My dog almost dies in summer every year.

"If brute force does not solve your problem....  then you are  surely not using enough!"

Kira Enomoto
Caldari Provisions
Caldari State
#53 - 2014-01-31 13:35:23 UTC
Mean while. Scandinavia has got the hottest winter as far back as I can remember. Denmark have had temperatures between 12(!) and 5 C most of the winter. We have only gotten snow a week ago.
I Love Boobies
All Hail Boobies
#54 - 2014-01-31 14:06:29 UTC
I find it funny when southerners experience winter weather, just like they probably laugh at us northerners when the temperature gets above 90 F (32 C). Lol
Plastic Psycho
Necro-Economics
#55 - 2014-01-31 15:45:17 UTC  |  Edited by: Plastic Psycho
Jenn aSide wrote:
It's the same for me in Texas as it is for them in Georgia, we get snow/ice so infrequently that when it does everything just shuts down. And the Yankess up north laugh at us and say "that's nothing".

Come summer time we get the last laugh when it's 100 degrees F (38c) down here which is good spring time weather for us, yet up north people start literally dying of heat stroke when it reaches 90 degrees F (32c).......

Been there, done that - Every summer - and have no problem with it. Musn't forget the humidity, which can hit 80% at times. Still survive it. AND have the cold and occaisional snow as well.

Come to the Mid-Atlantic region. We get it ALL - tornadoes (not too often, though I *have* stared straight up into the rotation as a funnel formed. It's fascinating), killing heat, and bone-chilling cold. Only thing we *don't* get is HUGE snowfalls. Except when we do.
Kagura Nikon
Native Freshfood
Minmatar Republic
#56 - 2014-01-31 17:21:14 UTC
Plastic Psycho wrote:
Jenn aSide wrote:
It's the same for me in Texas as it is for them in Georgia, we get snow/ice so infrequently that when it does everything just shuts down. And the Yankess up north laugh at us and say "that's nothing".

Come summer time we get the last laugh when it's 100 degrees F (38c) down here which is good spring time weather for us, yet up north people start literally dying of heat stroke when it reaches 90 degrees F (32c).......

Been there, done that - Every summer - and have no problem with it. Musn't forget the humidity, which can hit 80% at times. Still survive it. AND have the cold and occaisional snow as well.

Come to the Mid-Atlantic region. We get it ALL - tornadoes (not too often, though I *have* stared straight up into the rotation as a funnel formed. It's fascinating), killing heat, and bone-chilling cold. Only thing we *don't* get is HUGE snowfalls. Except when we do.



Here in brazil our local speciality are the 100mm of rain in a single hour.... with something like 1 lightning bolt per second during the same period...

"If brute force does not solve your problem....  then you are  surely not using enough!"

Thead Enco
Deep Core Mining Inc.
Caldari State
#57 - 2014-01-31 18:19:35 UTC
it's not like anything of value is being produced there anyways.
Nyla Skin
Caldari Provisions
Caldari State
#58 - 2014-02-01 07:35:37 UTC
silens vesica wrote:

There are a whole slew of those meme-images...

Twisted


To be honest, its kinda fake.. This winter has been abnormally warm with little snow. Last two winters were like the picture but not this one. This winter all the cold air seems to be over north America..

In after the lock :P   - CCP Falcon www.nizkor.org/features/fallacies

ctx2007
Nascent Omega
#59 - 2014-02-01 08:10:11 UTC
"Winter is coming"

You only realise you life has been a waste of time, when you wake up dead.

Vyl Vit
#60 - 2014-02-01 08:38:36 UTC  |  Edited by: Vyl Vit
Not to be unduly alarmist (which is rather fun, actually), a few comments about North American weather. Living in hurricane country tends to make one glue the nose to the weather map. Having grown up in tornado country got me started early on this.

I can say unequivocally, and will argue with anyone who disputes this, that the weather patterns over North America we've come to see as "normal" have NOT been following the normal pattern over the past three years, for certain - two years previous to that (taking into account natural variations we should expect occassionally.)

Several things point to this by way of events, the most significant of which is the long-standing drought in the area once known as "The Breadbasket Of The World" (where we grew scads of wheat and corn, but now where a huge amount of cropland is drying up and blowing away;) tornados appearing as far north as Vermont, but with more frequency in west Pennsylvania and parts of New York state; the absence of hurricanes threatening my house, but finding themselves heading for South Carolina (all the way up to New York - Sandy for a good "instance";) AND - severe storms that normally would hit where I live doing a nice tight curve in the Atlantic and hitting Portugal and Spain (of all places!)

Because the weather (of all things) has been turned into a political hot-button issue (as though there aren't more suitable things to fight about), I've been quietly watching the weather maps, and satellite imagery provided by GOES http://weather.msfc.nasa.gov/GOES/ . One significant change that is different than (say) 35 years ago is the path and trajectory of the Jet Stream (the high-altitude air current that guides arctic air into, or steers it away from the U.S.) This shift takes rain that historically fell on the mid-western wheat growing region and shifts it northward to fall upon Alberta (and parts thereabouts), where now unprecedented flooding is beginning to occur. (Fancy that!)

Had you been tracking the last two arctic air surges, you'd have seen that rather than coming in from the northwest, and surging in on a southeastern trajectory, both came directly south from over central Canada. You may recall The Alberta Clipper. These two weren't that, and they are so unprecedented we have no cutesy name for them. If this persists, over time we will, of course.

I've been sitting here for the past five years now, waiting to see if my neighbors will get their money's worth from the $10K steel shutters they had placed on their windows (a deal I passed up), or if (as it's now looking) for once I was clever in not doing what everyone else was. Our hurricanes just don't seem to want to show up. Most of these storms coming off the west coast of Africa are finding themselves dissipating in the mid Atlantic Ocean, or as I said, hitting the Eastern Seaboard from South Carolina all the way up to New York City; quite a few hitting Spain and Portugal. Europe is seeing corresponding, unusual flooding from these weather systems that used to head due west from Africa and land on us here in South Florida.

Average temperatures, rainfall amounts, calendar marks for seasonal shifts have all been altered in every state in the U.S. without exception; nothing radical, but noticeably. And, I really don't MISS my hurricanes. They are a royal pain in the butt. However, we're pretty much prepared to deal with them here, which apparently is not the case in the areas they now seem to like. (Fickle tourists. Go figure.)

EDIT: I could go on for a few pages on this most interesting subject. But, that'd ruin your Googling and finding out for yourself! Bottom line? Things have changed, and they will not be the same again. What this new "thing" will become...Will the great breadbasket become a great desert? Will our seasonal rain wind up watering the Atlantic Ocean instead of our crops? We shall certainly see, won't we?

tl;dr The weather is out of whack everywhere!

Paradise is like where you are right now, only much, much better.