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Null Security Space Guide to Running Sites

First post
Author
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#1 - 2013-12-10 23:18:30 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
Null Security Space Guide to Running Sites
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Introduction

This guide is intended to be a resource for players interested in exploration. Running sites happen to be most lucrative in null security space, and while much of the information provided can be used when running sites in empire space, this is intended for null security explorers. Running sites is a lucrative activity that can be enjoyed alone or with an alt. With the right resources, tools and techniques, anyone can plex their account in no time. This guide is always incomplete as there's always more information to add, but we will cover plenty, including skill training, fitting your ship, staying alive, dealing with local, D-scanning, running sites efficiently, choosing the right region to operate in, probing, managing loot and even going after other explorers. Any questions, comments feel free to contact me in game: Gummy Worm. Also please drop any corrections or additional tips in comments to add to the guide. Thank you.
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Basics
Skills
Fitting
Relic and/or Data Sites
Creating a Route
Gatecamps
D-Scan
Local
Running the Site
Turning the Table
Tips and Tricks
FAQ

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ArrowBasics

There are 3 possible sites that explorers can run with either a Relic Analyzer or a Data Analyzer, and those are Relic Sites, Data Sites and Ghost Sites. In this guide we will be covering Relic and Data Sites, and these are found by scanning available signatures in the system and pinpointing on the signature's signal, then warping in and running them. Prior to the Odyssey update there were rats that would frequent these sites, but now there are not. The only thing to worry about is Local and your ability to run sites efficiently. As mentioned, players are able to run sites without consequence of being aggressed by rats. Once in the site, cans of loot are available to be hacked open by operating the appropriate module within 5,000 meters, and then once open, the spewed loot is able to be grabbed by the player. When the site is run and all the cans are emptied the signature disappears from the Probe Scanner. We'll cover each step in the process, and the first thing being the skills required to explore and run these sites.
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ArrowSkills

Training for exploring will take you over many areas of skills, so to keep things "specifically-general" I will cover several skills that you will absolutely need in order to explore properly in null security space. Depending on where you operate from in game, wormholes for example, your suggested training level will be different than other players. Wormholers can afford to dedicate the extra time to maxing out their scanning skills as they utilize those skills all day, every day. For someone living in empire, the suggested training levels will be sufficient, but if you wish to maximize your efforts, training skills to V is never bad.

Keep in mind as well that skills not mentioned include the skills necessary to fit many of the modules listed in the fitting section, and the ships to fly.

Cloaking: This skill allows you to fit both the Improved Cloaking Device II and Covert Ops Cloaking Device II. Both are the only cloaking modules you will want to use when exploring. Each have their use which I will cover later.

Suggested training level: IV

Covert Ops: This skill is beneficial to get into the Tech II scanning frigates, and once you get into the actual ship it’s still beneficial to continue to train this skill. The Buzzard, Helios, Cheetah and Anathema, which are the Tech II scanning frigates, all provide bonus for each level of Covert Ops you have skilled. For each level, you get an extra 10% scanning strength, so potentially you get a 50% bonus to scan strength at level V of this skill.

Suggested training level: IV

IdeaNOTE: The Astero’s base scan strength bonus is 37.5%, so if you are below level IV for the skill Covert Ops, you will receive a better bonus to scanning with the Astero. Up until you reach level IV however, if ISK isn’t a concern, the Astero is the optimal ship to fly.

Astrometrics: This skill is your overall scanning skill. When you throw your probes out and scan down your site this skill is at work. Don't skimp on this skill, and take it up to no less than IV.

Suggested training level: IV

Astrometric Rangefinding: This skill furthers the benefits of the Astrometrics skill adding 5% increased strength to scan probes per level. Taking this to III is a nice place to land while you train other important skills. Doubling back to take this to IV is best, but unless living in a wormhole, taking this to V is debatably unnecessary.

Suggested training level: III

Archaeology: This is your Relic Site skill which enables you to use the module necessary to open the cans at those sites. The higher you train this skill, the less dependent you'll be on the rigs that increase your strength to operate higher difficulty Relic Sites.

Suggested training level: V

Hacking: This is your Data Site skill which enables you to use the module necessary to open the cans at those sites. The higher you train this skill, the less dependent you'll be on the rigs that increase your strength to operate higher difficulty Data Sites.

Suggested training level: V

Astrometric Pinpointing: This skill reduces scan deviation and reduces the chances for echoes when scanning signatures.

Suggested training level: III

Astrometric Acquisition: This skill allows you to scan signatures faster. Efficiency +1

Suggested training level: III
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#2 - 2013-12-10 23:18:48 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
ArrowRelic and/or Data Sites

So, what are the differences between Relic and Data Sites? The only difference is the loot to be gotten from these sites. The rogue/hacking game for each is the same. Both have a number of cans available in them, all filled with loot. Both Data and Relic sites, when they are opened spew out various types of loot. This loot floats away from the can and the player then has a limited amount of time to grab all that he wants by clicking on the loot icon, and the loot then tractors into the cargohold of the ship. All the available loot that comes out of the cans for both types of sites fall under 1 of 5 categories, and each can is titled as such:

Parts
Material
Data
Equipment
Scraps

Since all the loot that is available in both sites falls under one of these categories you can eliminate several categories simply by knowing what falls under each. Off the bat, Equipment and Scraps will be eliminated altogether since they are worthless in both Relic and Data Sites. This leaves Parts, Material and Data. 90% of the time you will be going after Parts and Material, but we’ll discuss the instances where Data cans are necessary to grab.

Now I will cover what is unique to each site as both offer a number of items under similar categories, but there are is a lot of useless loot that comes out of each site type.

Relic Site

Relic sites offer salvaged loot from NPC rats in that particular region. If you were to kill a rat and salvage the wreck, the same possible salvage material you would get from that wreck you would also get in the Relic Site cans in that region. This is important to consider when choosing which region to run sites in, and we will cover that momentarily. Relic Sites also drop Tech II and Faction blueprint copies, or BPC's. Those BPC's do not have an ISK amount attached to them because they can only be sold on the contract market and you will have to do some research to see what a fair selling price for each are. Faction BPC's include control towers, batteries, ships and modules. These are generally very, very valuable.

Research is being conducted on this theory, but it is believed that Relic Site cans in null security have a tier system to them so that some have better goods inside than others. The following are the names of cans in order from best to worst, and naturally, the best cans would be more difficult to access:

Ruins
Remains
Rubble

Relic sites predominantly drop salvage as their loot. Salvage comes in two types, Blue and Yellow. This salvaged material is housed in the cans, and when you access each can you can grab the salvaged material within. “Where does the salvaged material come from?” Theoretically, these cans are the remains of rat outposts where ships once were. Think of them as ghost towns. Each region, since they have different types of NPC rats that inhabit it, houses different types of salvaged material.

Educate yourself on the regions and the different types of NPC rats, first. The following is a list of the NPC rats and what blue salvage they drop. Go here to Dotlan, bookmark the page, and see which Outlaw Regions have which NPC rats in them. This is valuable information to have even if you’re not running sites. Going back to the loot though, as we covered, there are two types, Blue and Yellow. Blue is still intact and thus more valuable. Yellow salvage is less so because it is in less optimal condition; Broken, melted, tripped, etc.

IdeaNOTE: When deciding where to run sites it is suggested to check the market as certain blue salvage prices may rise during particular expansions and thus a specific region would yield greater results. Keep in mind that there is blue salvage that drops no matter what region you are in, and I will cover those.

The following is a list of the NPC rats of various regions and the blue salvaged material that is exclusive to those regions/NPC rats.

Angel Cartel: Single-Crystal Superalloy I-beam
Blood Raiders: Capacitor Console
Guristas: Intact Shield Emitter
Rogue Drones: Drone Transceiver
Sanshas: Intact Armor Plates
Serpentis: Collecting data

The following are all the blue salvage that can drop in Relic Site cans. It will be an ongoing process to assign these to particular regions that are exclusive to these types of salvage in the list above. As time goes on I will update the list above. For now, these are all the blue salvage available in the universe:

Artificial Neural Network
Capacitor Console
Conductive Thermoplastic
Current Pump
Drone Transceiver
Enhanced Ward Console
Impetus Console
Intact Armor Plates
Intact Shield Emitter
Interface Circuit
Logic Circuit
Lorentz Fluid
Micro Circuit
Nanite Compound
Power Circuit
Power Conduit
Single-Crystal Superalloy I-beam
Telemetry Processor
Trigger Unit

We omitted Equipment and Scraps from the types of cans to go for, originally, so that leaves us with Parts, Material and Data. Salvaged goods that spew from Relic Sites always fall under Parts and Material. This is what you will go for most of the time. The only time you will ever go after Data cans is if there is a Tech II or Faction BPC in the can since they are very expensive on the contract market, which is the only place you can sell these. If you do not see any Tech II or Faction BPC in the can before attempting to access it only get Parts and Material.

IdeaNOTE: Parts and Material cans will still yield useless items such as Carbon, Electronic Parts and Spatial Attunements. These are dispensable and when your cargohold grows closer to capacity, it is suggested to jettison all that you have of these items and make room for blue and yellow salvaged material.
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#3 - 2013-12-10 23:19:35 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
Data Site

Data Sites offer material used in research, invention and manufacturing, as well, like Relic Sites, Tech II and Faction BPC's. The loot for Data Sites is significantly more bulky than the loot from Relic Sites. These items include Datacores, which are used in research, and Attainments, which are used in invention.

Data Sites also seem to have a tier system with regards to their cans, much like Relic Sites. The following are the possible types of cans in order from best to worst, and naturally, the best cans would be more difficult to access:

Databank
Mainframe
Com Tower

The following are all the Attainments. I will not list the Datacores as there are too many to name, but there are only so many Attainments and they can be quite lucrative. Like the salvage in the Relic Site cans, some Attainment and Datacores are worth more than others. It is important to know which are selling for the most amount of ISK at any hub in order to decide if a particular can is worth running.

Cryptic Attainment
Esoteric Attainment
Incognito Attainment
Occult Attainment
Optimized Cryptic Attainment
Optimized Esoteric Attainment
Optimized Incognito Attainment
Optimized Occult Attainment

Types of Cans in Sites

Now let’s go over what category of cans to go for. We omitted Equipment and Scraps from the types to go for, originally, so that leaves us with Parts, Material and Data. Datacores and Attunements that spew from Data Sites always fall under Parts. This is what you will go for most of the time. The only time you will ever go after Data cans is if there is a Tech II or Faction BPC in the can since they are very valuable on the contract market, which is the only place you can sell these. If you do not see any Tech II or Faction BPC in the can before attempting to access it only get Parts only.

IdeaNOTE: Parts cans will still yield useless items such as Carbon, Electronic Parts and Spatial Attunements. These are dispensable and when your cargohold grows closer to capacity, it is suggested to jettison all that you have of these items and make room for Datacores and Attainments.

"Which is better, Relic or Data?" is the question new explorers might be asking right now. Let's consider differences that don't have to do with market fluctuations which could turn cheap and useless blue salvage or Attainment today into something very expensive tomorrow. Simply put, Data Site loot is much more bulky and heavy than Relic Site loot, so you can run many more sites and collect far greater amounts of Relic Site loot than from Data Sites. In the picture below you will see how much space Data Site loot takes in the cargohold. I have omitted all the dispensable items from both categories of Relic and Data sites so that all that remains is the valuable loot. Highlighted items are from Data Sites. You’ll see that the Data Site loot comprises of 86% of the cargo’s volume.

http://i.imgur.com/tFvCthO.png

In the image below you will see all the Relic Site loot highlighted and the amount of space it takes up in the cargohold. While the market fluctuates, it is noteworthy to see what the estimated costs of both groups of highlighted material are. The Relic Site loot is almost 3x more valuable, and this does not account for the price of the Tech II BPC that I also have, which was looted from a Relic Site data can.

http://i.imgur.com/8rs7Ady.png

It makes more sense to cherry pick Data Sites for only the very best Attainments/Datacores, and then taking everything from the Relic Sites that you can. Sometimes when you grab spewed loot from Data Sites you will pick up some particularly hefty items. It is often necessary to keep your cargohold window permanently open when running sites so you can Stack All your items and see what's taking up the most space should you run low while in the middle of running a site, and even with T1 scanning frigates, if you are indiscriminate with what you grab and which sites to run, your cargohold, despite having a larger capacity than the Tech II scanning frigates, will still fill up rather quickly, and this may be the longest grammatically correct sentence in the history of man, up until the previous.

As previously mentioned, if your cargohold comes dangerously close to being over capacity you will need to Stack All your items and quickly jettison your hefty items into space and bid adieu. Even Relic Sites produce useless items which can be jettisoned along with hefty items. The best way to select everything dispensable at once is to hold the left CTRL key while you click on each stack of those items one at a time, then when you're done highlighting all your stacks, right click one and Jettison. Now let's learn about fitting your ship and look at the modules necessary to explore effectively. We'll come back to site loot, shortly.
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ArrowFitting

For this guide we will be only covering I and II Covert Ops frigates, including the Sisters of EVE frigate, the Astero. Strategic Cruisers have advantages running sites in null security space as you might imagine, but we will not be covering those in this section. Fitting an exploration ship is actually very simple. There are really 3 different variations of exploration fits: Site Running, Site Running/PVP, PVP, and obviously when we cover something like fits with PVP utility, debate will ensue, and fitting around your skillset is the most important thing. So, we will keep things general.

For your Site Running and Site Running/PVP fits, you'll be fitting the same modules with regards to actually running the site. The following are absolutely important and necessary in order to run sites.
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#4 - 2013-12-10 23:20:22 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
MicroWarpdrive: The Microwarpdrive, or MWD, enables you to burn to each can as quickly as possible. And when you are grabbing spewed loot from the cans, keeping your MWD running will allow you to reach cans that are getting ready to disappear, denoted by them blinking. Some people debate whether or not this is best, but I have found it to be a lifesaver in grabbing the shiny loot in a can when it's just out of your reach. Some people stay stationary and click cans once until cans begin to go out of reach which is 3000km. Then activating the MWD is necessary. Overheat your MWD too if you need.

When you are unable to use the CovertOps Cloaking Device and can only use the Improved Cloaking Device, the MWD allows you to use the MWD/Cloak trick to evade non-bubble gate camps. In null security space you'll encounter bubbles more often than standalone gate camps with ships sitting on gate waiting for you to come in. So, while traveling to null security space you will inevitably go through low security space, and there are no bubbles allowed there, so standalone gate camps are all that you have to fear. And the MWD/Cloak trick will get you through any gate camp, barring someone bumping your ship. If you're unfamiliar with the MWD/Cloak trick go here immediately, learn it, practice it, and get good with it.

Cargo Scanner: This may be the most important module on your ship no matter the type of site you are running. It is debated that since Parts and Material, 90% of the time, yield the best material, a Cargo Scanner is unnecessary. But when you miss out on a Shadow Serpentis Large Control Tower BPC, you’ll change your tune. Before running any can, you want to target it and then scan it immediately. The image below shows what a scan looks like. A window pops up and tells you what is inside.

http://i.imgur.com/e6JtAZq.png

There are 10 Power Circuits and 1 Trigger Unit. Those fall under Parts and Material, so I know ahead of time to ignore Data cans and only go for Parts and Material. And since we can see that there are only 2 possible items worth grabbing, this will mean we only need 2 cans. After the loot is spewed and you start picking up Parts/Material cans, once you’ve picked up both the Power Circuits and Trigger Units there will still be cans to grab. You can save time by simply moving on to the next can at this point because you know that any other Parts/Material cans will only yield the useless material discussed earlier. The Cargo Scanner is key.

IdeaNOTE: If you and a partner decide to run sites together, a Cargo Scanner isn’t as necessary since both of you can grab loot. Since it’s mostly Parts/Material you will be grabbing, once those are all picked up by both of you, the Data cans can be picked up in case there is a valuable BPC in there.

Relic/Data Analyzer: Most explorers will only be able to fit the Tech I variants of these modules, and obviously they are necessary in running the sites, and until you reach the respective skill level V for either analyzer, the Tech I variant will be sufficient with even the hardest of sites. Training Archaeology and Hacking to V will unlock the ability to use the Tech II variants of each module. Is it worth it? This is debatable.

Probe Launcher with Core Probes: The Probe Launcher is how you find these sites in each system. You launch your probes, narrow down on 1 of the various signatures in the system, find out it’s a Relic/Data Site then warp in on it. Of course you need this module. Let’s look at the 3 types of Probe Launchers you will use, however.

Tech I Probe Launcher – Core Scanner Probes
Sisters Core Probe Launcher – Sisters Core Scanner Probes
Tech II Probe Launcher – Core Scanner Probes

The Tech II Probe Launcher provides a 5% bonus to scan strength, not including the training required to fit the module itself. It is much better to use than the Sisters Core Probe Launcher which grants a 10% bonus if you are a low skilled character. However, if you have terrific scanning skills and can operate the Tech II Probe Launcher, it is imperative to use it since it costs much less than the Sisters Core probe Launcher.

The idea is to stay alive, and most times the Sisters Core Probe Launcher will be more expensive than the ship you’re in, and this is just a hazard of the occupation. “You’ve mentioned nothing about the Tech I Probe Launcher.” I know. Don’t use it. Null security space signatures need great skills and/or great equipment to pinpoint signatures, and quickly. Efficiency is your greatest defense.

Improved Cloaking Device: The Improved Cloaking Device, or ICD, is only for those who cannot use the CovertOps Cloaking Device which enables you to warp while cloaked. When used in conjunction with the MWD you can do the MWD/Cloak Trick. See above in MicroWarpdrive for information about this.

CovertOps Cloaking Device:This is what you want right here, the ability to warp cloaked. This takes most danger from low security space travel while going into or out of null security. It’s that simple, really.

IdeaNOTE: The Astero has a reactivation delay for its Covert Ops cloak, and this can be countered by decloaking as soon as you enter warp, cloaked. Deactivate it then as soon as you land on the next gate and jump into the next system you will be able to repeat. People argue that this allows people to see you, but even in a Covert Ops ship when you enter warp and cloak up, people can still see you. When you land on gate and jump systems with a Covert Ops ship too, you will decloak and people will see you.
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Now you’re ready to get ready to head to null security space and make some ISK. It’s time to create our route.
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#5 - 2013-12-10 23:45:31 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
ArrowCreating a Route

There are a lot of factors that go into creating a route, and there are 2 parts to it. The first part is getting there, and the second part is traveling while there. The in between that separates those 2 parts is the final low security space system just before you dive into null security space. You never want to go to null security space through high security space because 10/10 times those gates will be camped because of the high traffic of zealous new players wanting to get a taste of the forbidden. Avoid these entrances at all costs.

OK, so we’re going through low security space, that’s fine. Many entrances are barren and uncamped, but there are still those low security space entrances that are guarded just as well as high security entrances. At least now we have narrowed down the first part of creating a route. Let’s open the map up and take a look at some statistics.

I like to keep all my region labelson so that I can easily see where null security space is. Let’s choose Providence as our region to explore. It has a low security entrance system and this is exactly what we want.

IdeaNOTE: You’ll notice I haven’t mentioned anything about optimizing the length of your route so you don’t have to travel as far. You will be traveling very long distances when exploring in null security space and so choosing where to explore based on how far it takes to travel is not suggested. Suck it up and make the 30 jumps to a region if that’s what you need to do.

When we open up our map and look at the entrance into Providence null security space we can gather a lot of information just by looking at certain statistics. The first statistic we want to look at is Ships Destroyed in the Last Hour. R3-K7K is the system we are looking at because we’re not worried about the last low security space system. It’s the initial jump into null security space that we are concerned about.

http://i.imgur.com/BN9B7nt.png

According to the statistics, there have been zero ships destroyed in the last hour. That is great. It does not paint the entire picture though because a gatecamp may still be there and it’s just been so effective that perhaps explorers are finding other entrances into Providence to avoid the camp. OK, so let’s look at Average Pilots in Space in the Last 30 Minutes.

http://i.imgur.com/BzMBevK.png

The statistics show that there has been an average of 5 pilots in the last 30 minutes. Well, this lessens the possibility that there is a massive gatecamp then since you would have to assume that some of those 5 pilots are simply people passing through. So far it’s looking good. The last statistic we’ll look at to eliminate even more, the possibility of a gate camp is Escape Pods Destroyed in the Last Hour.

http://i.imgur.com/SvokwBF.png

We can see that in the last hour there have been zero pods destroyed. This is all looking good. At this point we can go ahead and undock, head to the low security system entrance and get ready to dive. This is pretty much all you can do outside of having access to specific intel of those who have traveled through that system and can tell you firsthand that it is dangerous or safe to enter.

IdeaNOTE: Many people use Dotlan as a place to look at statistics. Dotlan updates regularly and is equally a good tool to use. It is also easier to see the layout of systems than it is from the in-game map.

Once you make your way into that last system, what I like to do is warp 100km off of the entrance gate, cloaked up, then once I exit warp I turn 180 degrees and just burn away from the gate while remaining cloaked. I do this because now I can safely reopen my map and recheck all 3 of those statistics to see if anything has changed. If there’s been a sudden spike in ships destroyed then it can be safe to wonder if a camp has just begun on the other side. If this is the case there is no shame and finding a new region or entrance to enter through. Another thing you can do is simply ask players exiting the gate if there is a camp on the other side. ”Talk to players? What?” I know it’s in insane concept, but you’ll be surprised how happy people are to help and let you know if something dangerous lurks on the other side.

What I like to do is simply send a player who just exited the null security system a private conversation and keep it light and quick. “Hey there, I don’t suppose you’d mind telling me if there was a camp on the other side of R3-K7K.” It’s that easy. If they say no, simply wave them on with a o/, and say thanks. Throwing them some ISK as a thank you is a nice gesture as well. If you open up a conversation with someone who isn’t bothered at all to get a conversation invite, go the extra effort to ask if coming back through that region if there were any systems that had hostile activity. The entrance system might be clear and safe, but that second system might have 10 Hurricanes waiting for you with a Phobos on gate.
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ArrowGatecamps

So, you jumped into null security space, finally and there’s nobody here. We’re all set to run wild like kids in a candy store, right? No. Every system you jump into is a different adventure, and you’re just 1 system in. Let’s talk about different types of gatecamps and how to get around them. Most of them you should be able to avoid by simply hitting your cloak right away once you enter warp from a gate. If you cannot use a CovertOps Cloaking Device II you’ll obviously have to master the MWD/Cloak trick. Other gate camps are a bit more problematic as there will be warp disruption bubbles covering the entire gate, or there could be a Interdictor ship sitting on gate which is just waiting for someone to jump through so they can throw their bubble out and catch you.
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#6 - 2013-12-10 23:46:35 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
People Sitting on Gate without a Bubble: This one is pretty common and you can expect to see it often. Either they are scouting for something behind or in front of you and they are just there to scout the way for the ship, or they might just be arriving on gate and jumping back over. When you jump into a system you have 60 seconds to see what’s going on under cloak. Nothing can decloak you except yourself in that 60 seconds. Take this time to see what the ships are and if they could be a problem for you.

If there are no bubbles on gate, and there are no bubbles in front of you where you are about to warp to, as long as you have mastered the MWD/Cloak trick or have a Coverts Ops cloaking device, you’ll be just fine.

IdeaNOTE: Do not warp gate-to-gate in null security space if there is someone else in the system with you. Your maximum D-scan range is ~14AU and if there are a bunch of warp disruption bubbles on your next system’s gate, which is 75AU away from you, you will NOT see it. Always bounce to a planet closer to the gate, cloak up and recheck your D-scan. If you are uncomfortable with D-scanning, jump below to the next section and read about D-scanning, then come back up and continue on.

People Sitting on Gate with a Bubble: Alright, so you jumped into a system and you’re greeted with a disco ball surrounding your ship. Don’t panic. You’ve got 60 seconds, remember? If there is anyone on gate they will know you’re there, and will be waiting for you to recloak to try to get out of the bubble. You cannot warp anywhere from within these bubbles, so you naturally have to escape. We can do this. Here’s how bad it could look.

The first thing you want to do is zoom out from your ship and see the shortest path to the outside of the bubble. Sometimes people place warp disruption bubbles so terribly that you may actually be near the edge and it’s as easy as double clicking behind you, cloaking up, waiting for a second or two to exit the bubble, then warping off. Other times you be right smack in the middle. If you are in the middle, you’re going to want to go in the opposite direction from where the ships that are waiting are at. And all you will do is simply double click into space away from those ships, pulse your MWD, activate cloak, and then hope that those ships don’t burn towards you. If anything gets within 2000 meters from you, you will be decloaked. This is what makes interceptor ships real popular for gatecamps because not only are they immune to warp disruption bubbles, but they are the fastest ships in the game and can drop on your position quick.

Here’s a tip on how to avoid this if you do see several interceptors on your bubble that you just jumped into. Double click towards the shortest distance as normal, MWD, activate cloak, and they will see where you’re headed. Now IMMEDIATELY change vectors and go laterally into a different direction. The interceptor will not be expecting it and if they do happen to burn to where you were going, they will miss you completely. Drop a o/ in Local and carry onward.

Dictor Sitting on Gate: Yeah, this one sucks. If you hesitate at all with this one you’re going down in flames. Let’s go ahead and familiarize ourselves with these ships so we can easily spot them when we jump into a system, because the faster we recognize these ships, the faster we can act, because with these ships, reaction time is our only defense since they will be right next to you on the gate and remaining cloaked is very, very difficult to do.

Phobos
Broadsword
Onyx
Devoter
Eris
Sabre
Flycatcher
Heretic

If you see any of these, IMMEDIATELY align to a planet, the sun, anywhere, and then attempt to warp. The only thing you can hope for is that they’re not paying attention to their computer for a split moment and you can escape their bubble. Once you’re out, you’ll want to pay attention to your D-scan to see if they’re moving around and jumping to your possible next gate’s destination to chase you down. Things can get ugly real quick if you have an interdictor/heavy interdictor chasing you, and especially if they have interceptors with them like a horde of flying monkeys. Aligning will put your ship into motion and will give you a chance to move out of the bubble that pops. MWD'ing back to gate is a possibility but many dictors "double-bubble" and will pop back through with you and bubble you on the other side. It's a coin flip.

Lastly, let’s consider that you’ve jumped into a system where the entrance gate is empty, but your next gate in system may have a camp waiting for you.

Camp Sitting on Exit Gate: We’ll keep this one kind of general, but it’s all a matter of understanding what ships you catch on your D-scan to determine if there’s a real threat to you. Let’s say you jump into a system, gate is clear and then you see 15 people in Local. Your immediate question should be “Where are they?” Get closer to your next gate so that you can put a D-scan on it and see if you spot things like disruption bubbles, containers or ships. Any combination of those 3 is bad, but not the end, really. You just have to be smart and patient.

So, you’ve warped to a planet that’s real close to your next gate, at 100km off right? And now we see that there are warp disruption bubbles and even a few ships. This is quite easy to get around, and once you’ve negotiated enough situations like this your real concern should be “Does this gatecamp extend to the next system too?” But let’s focus on this camp first, though. Now that we know the camp is there, let’s warp to it as safely as we can.
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#7 - 2013-12-10 23:47:24 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
Go ahead and click F11 on your keyboard. Oh, what’s this? More **** on my screen? Lovely. But this is actually very, very useful when you’re out in null security space. Go ahead and arrange your windows around to account for the space this new addition takes up. I want to direct your attention to the lower right hand window though, the Solar System. This is where you currently are. You can see all the planets, asteroid belts, gates and moons. This is great because if you need to get close to the next gate to D-scan it, you can know exactly what is close by. The green orb surrounding your location is your D-scan range. This is also great because in our predicament currently, we know that there’s a camp on our next gate but we want to see if there is anything else we can bounce to so that if we warp near or around the gate that we wont be dragged into a bubble.

If the gate you are watching has a planet or asteroid belt behind it I strongly suggest you warp to it at 100km, and from there you can improve your chances of warping to the camped gate at 100km, of course, and getting a better look at what is going on. So, let’s do that.

We’ve just arrived at an asteroid belt behind the gate, and now we’re warping to the camped gate at 100km, cloaked, and we will see what’s going on.

http://i.imgur.com/ZgcMM5N.png

Take a look at what we’ve got. Here is our camp. We’ve got 5 bubbles, many ships, and then many containers within those bubbles to decloak any ships that are cloaked that happened to get sucked into those bubbles. Well, we’re almost there. The hard part is over, really, which is just landing safely on grid of the camp and not being in a bubble. Now all we have to do is fine a nice line of sight that is free from bubbles and burn away from the gate until we are exactly 150km away. Once we are 150km from the gate we can warp to and jump the gate as if we were on the other side of the system. Look at the picture again and you’ll see that I have perfect line of sight and just need to step back about 10km before I can warp and jump.

OK, so now we know about what camps we could expect, but there was a lot of talk about D-scanning and you may not have the firmest grasp on that. Not a problem. Let’s take a look at this amazing tool and see how it not only helps PVP’ers find their targets, but it helps targets evade PVP’ers.
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ArrowD-scanning

D-scanning is something that most new players just chalk up to something elite players do, and they just prefer to avoid it and get a firmer grasp on the rest of the game first. The gist of D-scanning is that it scans anything that your overview can see within a given range and direction. It does not allow you to warp in on the results as if you were scanning it with probes, but it tells you where something is in relation to you. For PVP’ers this is absolutely essential to use. Faction warfare militia members, wormholers, most players live and die by their D-scan. What about explorers? Yes, explorers live and die by it as well, but they often die by it at the hand of a more learned pilot. So, let’s just dive right on in and get our hands around this D-scan with regards to the null security space explorer.

First thing is first, understand the D-scan and all that it does. The first thing you want to do is set your overview to a setting that will pick up things like jump gates, scanning probes, ships, etc. This is usually just the default overview that we all use, but if you run your D-scan and get a bunch of **** like asteroid belts, towers, moons, you might need to omit some things from your current overview setting so that you get just the meat and potatoes.

The range of your D-scan can reach up to 14AU, so in small systems you can see all the way across when you warp to the sun, cloaked of course, and run a quick D-scan. I even like to D-scan while I’m in mid-warp so that if I pass over any activity I will see it. Keep your F11 open as well so you can actually see your ships in warp from a bird’s eye view of the system and determine if you’re covering the most surface area. ”This is so much work. Why am I doing this?” Because you want to make sure that you know as much and more than the person who may be in system with you out in null security space. It is dangerous out there and information, efficiency and caution are your weapons. Unless you fly a Helios, then you can also include your 1 Hobgoblin II. But the ISK opportunity running sites is limitless and if you stay safe, you can make billions per week by practicing safe habits like D-scanning.

So, now you’re running a large D-scan of the entire area around you. Let’s try to find someone who may be at a planet uncloaked. On your D-scan you’ll see that you can increase the Angle with a lateral sliding button. You still have your F11 open, right? Go ahead and pay attention to what happens when you increase and decrease that angle on your lower right Solar System view. You’ll see that your field of view for your D-scan is affected. This allows you to look directly at something and D-scan that area. You can already see where I’m going with this, can’t you? So, let’s do it. Let’s bring our angle to about 15-30 degrees and scan at any of the neighboring planets. The D-scan scans from the field of YOUR view, not the direction your ship is pointing in. So move your camera all around and scan your heart out.

IdeaNOTE: If you check the Active Camera box on, your camera will move when you click on something like a planet, a belt or a gate. This gives you the most optimal line of sight when D-scanning and saves you time.
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#8 - 2013-12-10 23:54:57 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
So, go ahead and find the planet we suspect our player to be at, click on the planet icon in the distance and now we’ll see our camera move for us. Now we can D-scan at maximum distance at 15-30 degrees and BOOM there he is. We also see what ship he is in. For more practical applications with this, we are able to look at gates to see if there are warp disruption bubbles, ships and/or containers that may be present in those bubbles. We can watch a gate camp from a safe spot 13AU away and see people jump into the system, get podded and wrecks being looted, all with our D-scan.

Application of D-scan

Let’s say that you come into a system and you see an Ishtar on D-scan and there is just 1 other person in Local. Do we panic and just continue on our path? Not necessarily. What we can do is collect more information, and if there are many signatures in the system it will certainly be worth the time to collect that information. If the Ishtar is not cloaked up, he is very likely active in system doing other things, or the ship is at a POS tower, merely parked, and if there was nobody else in system we’d simply call that POS junk. But there is someone in system, so we assume this Ishtar is doing something. We warp to the sun at 100km, cloak up, and do a general scan to make sure we can still be within 14AU of the Ishtar.

We are. Great, now we start to lessen our angle of D-scan and essentially go in a circle, slowly narrowing down where he is. This may take a minute or two for new players. Some people can find a boat real quick. Your D-scanning skills improve quickly when you actively do it while exploring. So, we finally see that our Ishtar is at a particular asteroid belt and we can deduce that he likely is just ratting the belts and maybe looking for an officer escalation to make some nice ISK. ”So, we’re good now, right? He wont bother us?” Not necessarily. It’s possible he may just ignore you, and it’s also possible that he may come after you after he sees that you’re comfortable enough to throw out your probes and start scanning down one of the signatures. Remember, these systems are held by alliances and you are essentially stealing from them when you run these sites. Some people do not take kindly to this and they will come after you. Others will care less and just carry on. We’re going to stay on our toes though with an Ishtar.

What I do in this situation is throw out probes, cloak back up, and begin scanning down the signatures. In between probe scans I will tab over to my D-scan and run a D-scan at max distance and max range of 360 degrees. I do this over and over just to keep an eye out for PROBES. If the Ishtar stops what he’s doing and throws out combat or core scanner probes he is very much interested in you. At this point I would go ahead and forfeit the system’s signatures, make a note of it and come back later. The lesson to take from this is that when you see probes on your D-scan that do not belong to you that you need to consider an exit plan, immediately. If you are not interested in fighting, and probes come out, the quicker you decide what to do, the better.

If the person in Local is a part of the alliance that holds sovereignty space in that region, they could very well be on comms with other people and let them know where you are, where you could be heading, and if you don’t act quickly, you only give those people more time to set up a camp and wait for you. Local is another tool that can help provide you information. Let’s look at that now.

IdeaNOTE: The longer you play the game the more familiar you will be with ships you may come across with in null security space and their application to things like ratting, plexing, running sites, lighting cynos, gate camping, transiting or simply looking for YOU.
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ArrowLocal

I like to have Local window open at all times, and I suggest you do too. Move your window in a way so that you can see the entire name of the people in system. There will likely be very sparse chatter so, the names of Local are more important.

Local can provide you a lot of information just by simply jumping into a system and holding gate cloak. A simple scan of 5 people in Local can tell you that everyone are a part of different corporations, BUT of the same alliance that hold the system, and therefore may be working together or separately. You can also check the info of a person in Local where there is only you and him and see that the character is 3 weeks old and he is still a part of an NPC corporation. This can tell us that he read my explorer’s guide and he is confident enough to go exploring as a young toon and make some serious ISK.

So, you can see that checking corporations, alliance and even the age of toons is very helpful. Check their bios. Some people keep information that is pertinent to what they do in the game, in their bio. People who do PVE like missions, ratting and plexes may have information in their bio regarding NPC damage types, but as others will state, that may be what they WANT you to think.

Another thing you can do if you suspect someone might be looking to hunt you down if they enter Local and are there for an extended period is to look up their killboard and see what kind of stuff they’ve flown or killed recently.

I like to go here and enter the person’s name into the search bar and look at their activity. If someone has lost 20 Magnates, a T1 scanning frigate in the past month or so, and they’re in system with you, it’s safe that you can possibly throw your probes out, scan the sites down and just race him there. If your zkillboard result reveals that the pilot flies bombers or Force Recons and he has killed many Covert Ops ships in the past week, it is fair to say that you need to move on and keep an eye out for that name.
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#9 - 2013-12-11 00:12:19 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
IdeaNOTE: Adding players to your watchlist who go after explorers or who often camp gates isn’t a terrible idea. Your watchlist adds up quick, but when you see a red in Local, it could save your life when you stop to check the description of the contact you added and see that a week ago you spotted him in a Sabre camping a gate in the particular region you’re at.

Local out in null security space is generally very quiet. When you pop in, people who are in Local will notice. They may or may not care, but they will notice. This is something that really differs from player to player, but for me I will think nothing of just saying hello in Local if it is just me and maybe someone else who could very well just be at their tower just working on some stuff. If you’re the type of person who enjoys some light conversation, I think it’s harmless to talk in null security space.

Be prepared for responses that reflect that complete opposite of this point of view, like when I was called a fuking cocksmoker faggt for telling someone in a capsule to fly safe o/. That sort of thing will most certainly happen. I’ve met some very interesting people of many alliances though, and have had made some nice contacts. You may find yourself sitting cloaked, in a safespot just chatting about nothing with someone who is bored and interested in similar things. And you may also gather some intel as well. I’ll explain with a story that happened to me.

Application of Managing Local

I was running sites in a particular region that was held by alliance X. When I entered one of their systems I spotted a Sabre on D-scan and immediately burned back to gate and went back out the other way. I did this because the system only had 2 gates, 1 in and 1 out. So, they could very easily keep me pinned in the system. When I jumped back into my original system, I warped off to a safespot and cloaked up. Sure enough, they came right in behind me and set up shop. They tried everything to get me to come out. They brought in a pilot in a Probe and he spoke in broken English, telling me that it was safe that there were 2 Relic Sites and I could have 1 of them. Awesome, I said. Thank you so much, and I will gladly accept that generous offer. The Probe left and still the Sabre remained. I tried talking to the Sabre pilot in Local but to no avail could I get a response from him. He didn’t even laugh at this gif. How could you not lol at that. Anyway, I added him to my watchlist and decided to just sit overnight in system and try again in the morning.

IdeaNOTE: When you explore you will run into many obstacles in your way. If you cannot divert your route and you are cornered with people looking for you, you will have to find a safespot, remain cloaked and log off safely. To log off safely right click on your capacitor and you’ll see the option in the menu to do so. When you log off safely your ship is no longer in the system for anyone to scan down with combat scan probes. You must first leave any fleet you are a part of, decloak, and then choose to log off safely. While the 30 second timer is counting down you are a scannable target in space. Run D-scan repeatedly and if you see combat probes, cancel the log off and find a new safe, wait a bit and then try again.

Anyway, when I logged back in the next morning the system was empty. So, I immediately checked my watchlist and saw that our esteemed Sabre was logged off. Great! So, I fired up the map and checked the stats on the neighboring system before I jumped to make sure there wasn’t a camp. There wasn’t. Double great! So, I jumped into that system and even found a couple Relic Sites to run. No sooner than when I finished a Relic Site did the Sabre pilot log in and go right through my system and jump the gate to the next system. He hoped I wouldn’t notice. Anyway, I decided to go AFK in a safespot and do some other things on my alt. A scanning pilot from the same alliance and corporation came into the system and threw out probes. I told him that there was a nearly finished Relic Site and a fresh one, and that he was welcomed to have at it. He said thanks, and we started talking a bit. After a while I mentioned to him that I was likely going to stay in system for a while since there was a Sabre waiting for me on the other side.

At this point, the pilot should have admitted nothing, and said nothing or just “lol” and change the subject. But what he did was cost this Sabre, possibly up to 600 million in Relic Site loot and a satisfying kill, when he told me that they were talking about me in comms and that the Sabre was in fact waiting for me. I was shocked he told me that, and any second thought I had about maybe just going through the system was completely gone.

Stay vigilant with Local, but don’t be afraid to be human and just talk to people. Keep your guard up, but don’t be a neckbeard douche canoe that doesn’t talk to anyone because everyoneisafteryou.
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ArrowRunning the Sites

Now finally we can focus on running the site itself, and maybe a bit of scanning. FINALLY! Right? Well, the easiest way to do this is to show you with a video, so I made a brief video that summarizes some things we’ve already covered, but more so covers the logistics of actually running the site. Everyone does certain things differently but the best way to pick up some of the things I do is to watch it first-hand and listen while I’m doing it.

Exploration Video: 37 minutes long
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#10 - 2013-12-11 00:15:45 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
ArrowHunting Explorers

So, now we’ve come to the underbelly of exploration which is essentially turning the tables. As an explorer with all these techniques, tips and methods, you now have a good understanding on how explorers operate and what tools they have at their disposal. Sun Tzu would probably have something to say about this, I’m sure. Know your enemy, right? We’ll keep this pretty simple and go over methods individually and conclude briefly with ships.

Fishing

The obvious method to catching an explorer running sites is to scan a site down, cloak up in the site and wait. You will find that most explorers will not run a site with someone in system, and so this may yield fewer kills than you expect. If you feel like you would like to try this method of fishing, here are some things to keep in mind.

When you decloak and attack an explorer do you have the skills and/or modules fit to target and tackle the explorer before they warp out? If not, a Sensor Booster could help, barring the explorer not noticing you for a few moments when you decloak. If you’re using a Stealth Bomber you have no delay, and this is why a lot of explorer hunters use these ships. So, when do you strike? The best time to strike is when the explorer pops a can and is focusing on the spewed loot. Their eyes are going left, right, up, down, they’re turning their camera, they’re waiting for loot to go white and start blinking. They’re busy. This is your best chance to strike.

The best place to sit is also well within your tackle range of a loot can as you will expect your explorer’s MWD to be engaged while running the can, so double-clicking into dead space and burning away from you is very possible.

IdeaNOTE: If you plan to let your explorer get comfortable and run a few cans before striking, which can certainly be beneficial as his guard lowers the more cans he opens, make sure you’re out of the line of sight between cans.

Lastly, when you decloak, burn right into him. Do not orbit. By the time you approach him he will already be initiating warp, so giving him that bump may be the difference in losing or getting the kill.

Fellow Explorer Noob

Another method is to scan the site down like you would if you were fishing, but instead of staying silent and hoping for the explorer to just ignore you in Local, strike up a conversation with the explorer and pretend that you are a carebear from high security space and you are trying out exploring. There are a number of ways to sell this. You can mention that there is a site in the system to run and you are having problems scanning it down. Ask the explorer if he’s scanned it down yet. Ask him for help. Show him your fit. Of course have a T1 frigate fit handy. Talk about your skills that are lacking. The key here is to play to his ego to make him feel superior and more knowledgeable. This will lessen you as a threat, and more as a pupil and inferior pilot. Here is an example of this trick nearly working. Note that where this hunter went wrong is when he decloaked and revealed his ship. Also note that myself and this guy are now friends and a part of the same corporation and have hunted explorers together.

Rush and Attack

Another thing you can do is jump into a pipe of systems where there is a site in one particular system. Note the system, scan the site down, bookmark the middle of the site and leave. Jump into the next system and make sure that there are no sites to run. This is all about timing your attack. Next is to head 1 more systems away. Now you’re 2 systems away from the original system. The reason you’re heading 2 systems away is because in the farthest system, which we’ll call A, you will be seeing an explorer enter and continue down the pipe towards your site-system, which we’ll call C.

Once in system A, your job is to simply hang out on the entrance gate cloaked and note the explorer coming in, his ship and possible defenses. The explorer will see you in Local and will likely press forward to the next system, which we’ll obviously call B. Let him go. Now is the hardest part, waiting. If there are any signatures in system B you will have to consider how long it will take in order to scan all the signatures down before finally going to system C. If there are no signatures, wait about 5-7 minutes which will be how long it would take for an explorer to scan down the site and enter it if they go straight to system C. You have to also consider that if there are multiple signatures they may or may not scan the site signature right away.

When it’s time to strike, warp to system C and immediately jump into the site. If your bookmark is on point, you’ll be able to burn, point and melt. This method, while complicated, works because if the explorer is a veteran explorer he may simply wait for probes to be launched before cloaking up, knowing that people can’t simply warp to a site without scanning down the site, first. This will likely not work against new explorers.

Ships and final thought

If you are going to run sites and also go after explorers, the best ship to use other than a T3 and force recon ship is one of the SOE ships, either the Astero or the Stratios. With either you have the bonuses to crack open the best sites, as well the firepower and speed to melt any explorer down and swallow their cargohold. The ability to warp cloaked is also important as you keep yourself safe. As long as you have the Cargo Scanner, the Analyzer(s) and the MWD, your PVP fit should be contingent on the bonuses of your ships and the strengths of your skills.
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#11 - 2013-12-11 00:22:11 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
ArrowTips and Tricks

Revealing Signatures: This is more of a trick to make sure that the system you jump into does in fact have signatures. For some reason signatures don’t always show when you jump into the system. So, here’s what you do—When you enter a system, check and uncheck where it says Show Anomalies. I generally have Anomalies not showing so when I double check it, it returns to Anomalies not showing, but when you do this it updates or refreshes the signatures if there are any.

Duo-Site Running: If you decide to run sites with a partner, either with a scout or a PVP pilot to protect you, you can adjust your fits to accommodate each other. But the main thing here is that you guys can attack the cans together. If you want to fit for PVP, you can lose the Cargo Scanner and just get every Parts and Material together, and then when all of those are collected you guys can scoop up the Data cans in case there’s a nice BPC in there.

Wiggling Back Home: This is simple. Instead of jumping all the way back home, when you’re ready to head home with all your loot, instead of ignoring the wormhole signatures, go ahead and scan them down, warp on grid with them, check to see if they go back to high security space and if they do, take that home.

Signature ID’s: Signature IDs all get renamed at the beginning of the day after DT, and when they do, they’re given similar IDs. The last 2 letters of the IDs of your signatures, if they are the same, they would have been there since downtime. And if this is the case then it is likely that others have scanned down and discovered that those signatures are likely non-valuable, being combat sites, gas sites or wormholes. So, for example GTZ-024, LTZ-531, OTZ-304, NTZ-011, ZBV-854. The first 4 that end with TZ are originally from downtime, and likely are worth passing up by other explorers. Of course, in very remote and distant null security systems where there have been not many jumps, it may be worth just scanning everything just to make sure.

Echoes: Echoes are when you’re scanning down signatures and after a result you end up with 2 signals for 1 signature. This is likely a result of either the signal being a high-end signature that will take a bit more oomph to scan down than what you have, or when you decreased the size of your scan bubbles, you went down too quickly in size, jumping 2 steps instead of 1 and now you’re left with an echo. To “get back on track” and continue to narrow down on the correct echo simply adjust your scan bubbles around the echo that’s furthest from your original scanning point.

Jump Safely: This should be a no-brainer but after a fellow corp mate just lost his Helios jumping into a system with his world map on, we feel the need to include this. Make sure you’re not distracted and can easily discern the situation when you jump into a new system. If you cannot, take care of your **** in a safespot, THEN jump into the next system.
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ArrowFAQ and Additions

Content will be added if people have any questions in the comments. Myself and others who’ve contributed to this guide will answer those questions and then add those Q’s and A’s to this section.

Mobile Depots? Fitting for travel and taking a Mobile Depot is always a viable option. Even fitting for specific sites and storing modules/rigs for the other type of site is an option.

Any implants worth using? The one that matters most is Poteque 'Prospector' Environmental Analysis EY-1005 which adds additional time to the spewed loot before they decay. When you need that last can or so, this can be a lifesaver.

Can I feign intel in Local? Yes, and here's an idea, dropping the current system in Local chat. It appears like you mistakenly dropped the system to your corpmates and the person(s) in Local may fear that help is on the way.

Are combat scan probes helpful? They can be good if you're looking for fights, as well. But if you're not you can use them as a deterrent. If someone is in a site that you want, drop combats and hope they see them. That may be all you need to scare someone off.
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Credit goes to Zzxar, Eaphod, others who have contributed to collecting this info and those who have corrected anything written so far.
Pinky Hops
Caldari Provisions
Caldari State
#12 - 2013-12-11 00:25:30 UTC  |  Edited by: Pinky Hops
Just skimming your guide. So far I see a few problems.

Problem 1:
Recommending Covert Ops V is absolutely silly. You do not need that for nullsec exploring, not one bit. Level IV is plenty.

Problem 2:
Quote:
Training Archaeology and Hacking to V will unlock the ability to use the Tech II variants of each module. Is it worth it? This is debatable.


This is false. It isn't debatable. If you are a heavy duty explorer, you get the T2 relic module. Period. The minigame can throw configurations at you that are impossible without a T2 analyzer (yes, even if you are completely rigged up with +coherence rigs and have the +coherence implant).

Problem 3:
In the fitting section, you seem to recommend fitting both a Relic and a Data analyzer at the same time. This is not efficient. With the advent of the Mobile Depot, you should never need to fit both at the same time. It's 60s to swap. Not a big deal. Not to mention you could bring other modules and tools with you (travel rigs to replace your scanning rigs for going through high risk space, for instance).

Problem 4:
You don't mention any specific numbers in your thread involving target scan strength. In general, you should aim for a minimum of 95 base probe strength (it might be a bit less, but I consider that a good target) for scanning down the hardest relic -- the Crystal Quarry.

Problem 5:
I believe I see you chatting with a known scammer in local. Gummy Worm? Oh wait, you ARE that person! Roll

Problem 6:
You seem to have forgotten the Astrometric Pinpointing and Astrometric Acquisition skills. These can help speed things up substantially with just 2 - 3 points in each.
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#13 - 2013-12-11 00:29:32 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
Reserved for additional space.
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#14 - 2013-12-11 00:37:30 UTC  |  Edited by: Gummy Worm
Pinky Hops wrote:
Just skimming your guide. So far I see a few problems.

Problem 1:
Problem 2:
Problem 3:
Problem 4:
Problem 5:
Problem 6:



Problem 1, it is a long train, and I agree V is not necessary. Corrected to IV

Problem 2, it is not absolutely necessary to train V for either H/A, with your previous logic. But if you are going to be exploring for the long haul as a profession, it most certainly is necessary to push to V. I currently have IV and use scope sharpener rigs and have little problem at all.

Problem 3, I have them both suggested as modules to use. I, personally don't run Data sites and don't fit Data Analyzers, and Mobile Depots are always an option. Adding that to the guide.

Problem 4, This guide is so dense that I tried to balance qualitative with quantitative information. As someone said previously, this is something that not many new players will have the patience to get through, but for those that do I wanted to provide as much meat and potatoes as I could.

Problem 5, que?

Problem 6, added
Pinky Hops
Caldari Provisions
Caldari State
#15 - 2013-12-11 00:45:51 UTC  |  Edited by: Pinky Hops
Also going to throw out that implants are a pretty big deal.

There are many scanning implants that help, but there is one in particular that helps more than any other.

Poteque 'Prospector' Environmental Analysis EY-1005

Gives you 5s additional buffer time on the scattered cans, which equates roughly into 2 additional cans you can pickup. Over time, you win big on it.

Costs about 25m in Jita. Pays for itself with insane quickness. You can often write off that last parts/materials can after you get a big one -- but the small fries add up fast and if you manage to get a big minican that you otherwise would have lost due to bad luck.....You get the idea.
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#16 - 2013-12-11 00:47:13 UTC
Pinky Hops wrote:
Also going to throw out that implants are a pretty big deal.

There are many scanning implants that help, but there is one in particular that helps more than any other.

Poteque 'Prospector' Environmental Analysis EY-1005

Gives you 5s additional buffer time on the scattered cans, which equates roughly into 2 additional cans you can pickup. Over time, you win big on it.

Costs about 25m in Jita. Pays for itself with insane quickness. You can often write off that last parts/materials can after you get a big one -- but the small fries add up fast and if you manage to get a big minican that you otherwise would have lost due to bad luck.....You get the idea.


roger
Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#17 - 2013-12-11 02:08:12 UTC
Yeah, not sure about the scammer thing, but I have an alt named Yummy Worm and everytime I go into Jita I get people calling me out for being a scammer and I'm like wut? No idea what's going on. But apparently Yummy Yummy Yummy is a scammer/ganker there, so I don't know.
Sebastor Cane
The Outlet
#18 - 2013-12-11 02:20:40 UTC
Gave you lots of +1s for all the effort you put into this.


Nice work
KuroVolt
Federal Navy Academy
Gallente Federation
#19 - 2013-12-11 05:18:25 UTC
Very nice write up.

BoBwins Law: As a discussion/war between two large nullsec entities grows longer, the probability of one comparing the other to BoB aproaches near certainty.

Gummy Worm
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#20 - 2013-12-11 05:25:41 UTC
Thanks fellas.
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