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I just lost a ship to a player pirate. What should I learn from this experience?

Author
Blood Fart
Rock Hard Productions
#21 - 2011-10-29 15:10:11 UTC  |  Edited by: Blood Fart
I'll regret this but here's some tips....

If you're a high sec mission runner and want to do the mission in the same way just decline it. Don't use a battleship if it can be avoided because they are very easy to scan; by the time you see them I can already have your location marked (once that happens you're kinda boned DO NOT go back in a mission fit)

BE PATIENT...don't get caught because you didn't feel like waiting for the 3 roaming flashy reds with combat probes out to get annoyed and leave ya alone or just leave (see below)

IF YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND AGGRESSION/GATE MECHANICS AND CAN'T GET OUT OF A CAMP GET YOUR SHIP READY AND FLY THERE WITH ANOTHER CHARACTER IN A SHUTTLE OR FAST FRIGATE FIRST TO SCOUT...you get 3 to an account use them.

SET UP YOUR OVERVIEW TO SEE PROBES, GATES, and RATS...spam d-scan at max range 360 with ANYONE in local

MAKE SAFE SPOTS BEFORE YOU GO TO THE MISSION. IF YOU SEE PROBES START DOING A BOUNCE WHERE YOU NEVER STAY STILL AND NEVER CREATE A PATTERN....that's very annoying. After 5- 10 minutes if you still see probes dock and log out for a short samich and beer break.....very VERY annoying.

(Proper annoying scarebear bounce= warp out of mission at 1st sight of probes to 1st safe, immediately warp to something weird like a customs office at 100, immediately warp to 2nd safe, warp 100 off gate, warp 100 off station......this won't always work but try to scan someone doing it to see what it's like....now imagine after 10 minutes they dock and log or safe and cloak.)

KNOW YOUR LOCALS....battleclinic killboards are your friend. Is the guy in local prone to hitting mission runners or does he just loose jaguars in "gud fites" from time to time with a 150 win - 265 loss record?


The very best way to mission in low sec is to not consider it a mission. Use it as bait and prepare with a PvP fit in a station. Anyone bothers you let them scan a crappy safe spot far away from any gates (to hinder back-up), swap to the PvP ship and go kick them in the junk.....even if you loose your crappy pvp ship you fought for what was yours and won before the guns started firing because now he's just training you....figure out HOW you lost, fit accordingly and try again.


07 Happy Hunting
Hamish Grayson
#22 - 2011-10-29 16:47:25 UTC
Kilrayn wrote:
Short answer: Don't mission in low-sec solo.


Right answer. (Mostly)


Kilrayn wrote:

It seems like you don't have much piloting experience, which was the main issue. Stick with empire until you're more comfortable in actual space.


Wrong answer. You don't gain experience by avoiding the places were you gain it. Sticking to empire will only allow you to develop bad habits and enforces the myth that you can only thrive in low-sec, null-sec and WH space after years of experience.

Instead of a new Raven buy 50 frigates, update your clone and get them all blown up doing dumb stuff in low-sec. Learn from it. You'll learn more and have way more fun flying a bunch of cheap ships than one expensive one. Try out low-sec PvP, PvE and maybe even some low-sec trade/ industry.

Also Eve-Uni or Red Vs Blue are great places to learn the ropes.
Seiei Hana
Fall From Grace
#23 - 2011-11-16 20:51:30 UTC  |  Edited by: Seiei Hana
Thanks for the amazing tips! I had a lot of reading to do, even just to understand EVE jargon and concepts like nano-fit, safe spots and scanner probes. Google, eve-wiki, eve-survival, battleclinic, E-UNI, EFT, and EVEMon are some of my new best friends.

I'm only now getting comfortable soloing in hisec, and know that I have much more reading to do to be just as comfortable venturing into losec again. Or maybe I'll just get into some cheap frigates and learn by dying a lot, as some of you suggested.

The last time I played more than a 5-day trial was in 2007, and I was docked for most of that time. Throw in a bunch of content patches and that makes me a newb. Shocked So this is how newb I am, but I just want to make sure because I don't know how current the info on the web is, and I simply want to be very aware of the risks I take:

1) If I anticipate dying, I'll be okay as long as I've insured my ship and updated my clone? And the clone only comes into play when my ship is ganked AND I'm pod-killed, right? Is there any possibility of losing SPs or my character?

2) Are suicide gankers the only real PvP danger in hisec? How, and how quickly, does Concord respond to PvP?

3) Is there a consolidated EVE-related website similar to wowhead for WoW? (WoW haters, please hate somewhere else.) I can research missions on eve-survival, but not items like "Kruul's DNA" (among many other things in my hangars), with user comments to tell me what this is for. The sites I've seen (like eveinfo) only regurgitate the info already provided in-game, or have no comments to help me decide whether to keep or sell an item.

Much appreciated! Big smile
ShahFluffers
Ice Fire Warriors
#24 - 2011-11-16 21:54:37 UTC  |  Edited by: ShahFluffers
Seiei Hana wrote:
1) If I anticipate dying, I'll be okay as long as I've insured my ship and updated my clone? And the clone only comes into play when my ship is ganked AND I'm pod-killed, right? Is there any possibility of losing SPs or my character?


Yes, yes, and yes.
Ship insurance will take the "sting" off of any T1 ship loss you incur which allows you to get back on your feet that much quicker.
Your Pod and clone come into play when your ship has been destroyed; if you pod is ganked then you wake up at the station you have set your clone to be at (be sure to have a shuttle or ship there "just in case"). If you clone is not kept updated then you will lose a "small" chunk of skillpoints off of the highest tier skill (see: skill that has taken the longest to train) you possess. If your station clone is kept updated then there is no fear of this.

Seiei Hana wrote:
2) Are suicide gankers the only real PvP danger in hisec? How, and how quickly, does Concord respond to PvP?


A danger... but not a major one unless you fulfill certain "criteria" that can best be summed up as "I-have-expensive-mods-on-a-low-HP-ship."
A general rule of thumb is to not fly around in a ship filled/equipped with mods that exceeds the value of the ship itself.
As for CONCORD... the speed of their response varies according to the security status of the system. In 1.0 space they respond in 10 seconds or less. In 0.5 space it takes a good 20 to 30 seconds for a response. 0.4 space and below will not see a response of any kind.

Other "threats" you might encounter in high-sec include, but are not limited to...

- can/wreck flipping
- war decs
- price fixing / market manipulation

Seiei Hana wrote:
3) Is there a consolidated EVE-related website similar to wowhead for WoW? (WoW haters, please hate somewhere else.) I can research missions on eve-survival, but not items like "Kruul's DNA" (among many other things in my hangars), with user comments to tell me what this is for. The sites I've seen (like eveinfo) only regurgitate the info already provided in-game, or have no comments to help me decide whether to keep or sell an item.Big smile


Meh... not certain about this one... but I can tell you this: with only a few very rare exceptions, everything in EVE is not "one of a kind." You can sell an item you find useless now, find out you need it later, and purchase it back. If you accidentally destroy an item, no problem. Go to the market or Contract listings and your can probably find it... for a price.
There are also items that serve no real "tangible" purpose... a good example being Kruul's DNA thingy. It used to be an item you could turn in for a reward, but not anymore. Now it's just something fuddy-duddy to keep around.
Anshio Tamark
Caldari Provisions
Caldari State
#25 - 2011-11-18 10:53:55 UTC
The very short version: You lost a ship, learn from it.

Really, the best thing you can do when you lose a ship is to learn not to make the same mistakes another time.
Ikra Atarm
The defenders of Greyskull inc.
#26 - 2011-11-18 15:52:25 UTC
If you are going to mission in low sec make sure to keep local open all the time when theres people jumping in spam your dscan ( their for a reason) also never be scared to pvp ive pvped sincer 500ksp an no sp is to low
Astrid Stjerna
Sebiestor Tribe
#27 - 2011-11-18 21:11:07 UTC
Jaxemont wrote:
Kilrayn wrote:
Short answer: Don't mission in low-sec solo.

This. You learned it the hard way with an expensive loss.

Also, what is your goal in EVE? Is it to mission? Did you always want to PVP, but you felt like you needed more SP before you began? Do you just like the atmosphere and just the act of undocking and seeing your ship in space gives you a warm fuzzy feeling that justifies you paying money for the game? (Not trying to be condescending, that's as legit a reason as any. Whatever floats your boat.)

Find what you want to do and go do it. Waiting to train up all skills to max before starting is folly. You might not even like what you thought you wanted, and now all that training time is gone. Find like minded people and learn together. Joining a corp is always a good first step.

Be proactive. This is a sandbox. You usually have fun by creating things with the sand, not just staring at it and waiting to be entertained.

TL;DR:
1. Find what you want to do.
2. Do it. Do not wait to max out your skills for it first.
3. Find a corp with like minded people and join it.
4. Play the game.
5. Profit.



I'd addto this by saying that when you find what you want to do, read up on it and learn about potential roadblocks. It's possible to buy skillbooks months before you're able to use them, which is really a waste of money.

I can't get rid of my darn signature!  Oh, wait....

Aessaya
Independent treasure hunters
#28 - 2011-11-18 21:25:46 UTC  |  Edited by: Aessaya
Well, among other rules of EVE there's this little one: "Always keep your clone updated". Also there's a good note: "by undocking you are concenting to pvp".
Own mistakes are usually the best teacher, so don't be afraid to do them, as long as you get some experience from it. You already are familiar with "don't fly what you cannot afford to lose" and "always insure your ship if you expect it can get popped" rules.

Before attempting a journey to lowsec fly around the systems for a while in some small fast and cheap ship (covert ops, if you can fly it, shuttle/rifter if you consider yourself a total noob). Get used to d-scan (directional scan), add scan probes to overview, be very afraid of the Combat variety (Core ones are harmless to you unless you are doing an anomaly). Get familiar with the local before you attempt doing a mission there. Make notes of which people are likely to be flying by and which are usually there or around. In lowsec space character's security status can tell many things about him/her, but is in no way a definitive factor - sometimes +5.0 carebear can be as dangerous as -10.0 pirate, but -10.0 pirate is a guarantee to be dangerous. Basically, the lower security status of a character, the more likely him/her to be hostile, if he's neutral to you.

Make some friends. Do missions together. It helps in many ways - every game is more fun when you have company and it is general rule of a thumb - more players mean more safety. But not always. Joining a player-run corporation helps immensely, there are multitude of corporations specializing in different tasks - pvp, pve, mining, trading, teaching, scamming - find one that suits your likes.

And do not do missions in systems with many neutral players! The more players are in system the harder it gets to control the situation.

Learn to align. It can save your precious ship on multitude of occassions, in both pve and pvp.

Know your enemy, be it a rat, player or a peaceful miner in the nearest belt.

Always have stations and gates on the overview, keep a special setting with star, planets and moons as well, but try to keep yourself from warping to unknown moons - for all you know you can be warping straight into hostile pos.

Never ever jump into a lowsec system in a big ship (bigger than a cruiser) without having it scouting prior to it. Even then you are not safe, but it helps to reduce the risk of jumping straight into a gate camp. Friends can also help here - ask one to watch the gate for you while you jump in.

Travelling alone in a lowsec is generally a bad idea, unless you absolutely know what you are doing.

I've run out of ideas so far...

Hope it helps!

Ah, you seek meaning? Then listen to the music, not the song.

Xi 'xar
Mise en Abyme
#29 - 2011-11-19 09:28:00 UTC
"Don't mission in lowsec" is probably the second worst piece of advice that you could ever recieve. The worst piece of advice you could recieve is "Dont go to lowsec".

Despite what some people might think, there is more to this game than shooting NPCs.

Despite the fact that you may have been humilitated and or have lost an expensive ship, you probably did learn something: Grinding through PVE, although it will make you rich, will, ultimately, not provide you with what you are really looking for.

If all you want in this game is isk and standings, then stay in highsec. Lowsec is where the fun is. Stop being afraid.

http://herdingwolves.wordpress.com/

Moistmuffin RKHT
My Little Uniponisus
#30 - 2011-11-22 00:52:59 UTC
Anytime I see another ship near me I warp away. The times I didn't do this (and sometimes when I did try) I always ended up seeing a loading screen back at the Center for Advanced Studies and then made a sandwich while I auto-pilot'ed in a rookie ship back to Dodixie.

/shrug - it sucks losing implants all the time, but that's just part of the game, I think my focus is more on how many times can I survive rather than how many times I die. At least, that's my fun.

I created Ave Molech and I love ponies.

Pixxie Twilight
#31 - 2011-11-22 03:58:06 UTC
You've received lots of good responses. Don't be discouraged.

I think the best thing is to find a corp that is active when you play, and that can help you to become good at PvP - teach you how to deal with being in a true PvP game where fights have real consequences. Preferably a corp that has a good number of PvP vets. By flying with them, your learning curve would be grounded in reality and hands on practice helps lots more than theory. I'm finding this is true for me.

Good luck!

Pixxie
>^^<

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