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Do you foreign people have english class in college?

First post
Author
embrel
BamBam Inc.
#21 - 2015-07-28 10:38:53 UTC  |  Edited by: embrel
I think she wants to know whether we have courses in our mother-tongues too.
Yes of course we do.
Webvan
All Kill No Skill
#22 - 2015-07-28 10:44:33 UTC
embrel wrote:
I think she wants to know whether we have courses in our mother-tongues too.
Yes of course we do.
By golly I think you're right! IdeaShocked

I'm in it for the money

Ctrl+Alt+Shift+F12

Scipio Artelius
Federal Navy Academy
Gallente Federation
#23 - 2015-07-28 10:50:21 UTC  |  Edited by: Scipio Artelius
Mike Whiite wrote:
okay I'll bite.

In the Netherlands, people are taught, depending on their education level, 3 to 6 foreign languages before attending university. Welcome in the country of merchants

English being the first, starting as early as the age of 10, though the "real Teachers" are TV and Cinema as most programs and movies are subtitled instead of using voice over and then there is the internet of course.

I guess he's asking a different question.

The Dutch are great with languages (lived in The Hague for 7 years), but he is asking, do you have subjects in School/University that are the equivalent of Dutch 101, Dutch 102, etc.

In school, a lot of English as a first language countries have English, which focuses on grammar, composition, literature, etc.; essentially subjects that teach the rules of communicating formally in English, even though you might think that is something natural because it's the first language of the country.

CAM is asking whether the same sort of thing exists elsewhere. Do Dutch schools have Nederlands 101 that teaches proper grammar, etc.
Jenshae Chiroptera
#24 - 2015-07-28 11:10:28 UTC
"Do like you foreigners eat like real food like hamburgers and like pizza and like tomatos or do you like eat roots and leaves? And like how do you get on the Internet? Do you like have to peddle and stuff or do you put an elephant on like a treadmill?"

Studying at a tertiary instituition and asking common knowledge questions. Something has gone very wrong somewhere.

CCP - Building ant hills and magnifying glasses for fat kids

Not even once

EVE is becoming shallow and puerile; it will satisfy neither the veteran nor the "WoW" type crowd in the transition.

Tippia
Sunshine and Lollipops
#25 - 2015-07-28 11:21:06 UTC  |  Edited by: Tippia
Scipio Artelius wrote:
In school, a lot of English as a first language countries have English, which focuses on grammar, composition, literature, etc.; essentially subjects that teach the rules of communicating formally in English, even though you might think that is something natural because it's the first language of the country.

CAM is asking whether the same sort of thing exists elsewhere. Do Dutch schools have Nederlands 101 that teaches proper grammar, etc.

That would probably be the equivalent of a “practical writing” course at uni level around here, but as general concept it's normally only part of some larger foreign language programs. In the case of Swedish, that kind of stuff is generally handled far earlier in the schooling system. Since foreign language schooling — usually English — is mandatory from the 4th year (age 9–10:ish), grammar becomes a natural and necessary part of the curriculum that way. Without it, the second language can't really be taught. Swedish as a subject is taught all through 9 years of primary school, in most cases, 3 years of secondary school. So it's more of a high-school kind of exercise than something that you'd come across in college or university.

That said, there is a “Professional Swedish” set of courses at the university around here, but it's a far more advanced than what the OP describes. I's more if you want to go into the field of corporate communications, and funnily enough, its prerequisite is that you've taken at least two terms worth of university-level English before you're allowed to apply. P


Also, Netherlands 101: The Netherlands is comprised of 12 provinces and 3 old colonial municipalities, two of which are Holland. Blink
Webvan
All Kill No Skill
#26 - 2015-07-28 11:25:12 UTC
Ok, so to answer this question properly: no, in the US, I don't believe we do. Well, maybe there is, but it's hidden away for few to find, for those that even care. Not only is illiteracy an epidemic, I don't even think that the majority of new teachers really comprehend the language any longer. Schools are falling while entitlement is rising. It's all about how we feel now, and how we need to group think to come to even basic decisions.

But it's not just the US, and it's not just language, but critical thinking in general is under assault. 40 years, no one can even put a man on the moon. Engineers are baffled how it was done. Such low-tech, yet they did it time and time again. Now? All the technological advancements, all the scientific achievements, we can hardly even get a payload into orbit. Devolution, while our computers crank out new stuff that we just don't understand. I'm sure there was a sci-fi book written on it at some point hah.

I'm in it for the money

Ctrl+Alt+Shift+F12

embrel
BamBam Inc.
#27 - 2015-07-28 11:38:18 UTC
Webvan wrote:
Ok, so to answer this question properly: no, in the US, I don't believe we do. Well, maybe there is, but it's hidden away for few to find, for those that even care.


see, a question I assumed to have an obvious answer shows me once more, that assumption is the mother of all ****-ups.

That's news to me. I assumed that in all developed countries, mother-tongue 101 would be part of the curriculum far earlier, because it is with us and our neighboring countries.

However...
Jenshae Chiroptera
#28 - 2015-07-28 11:58:17 UTC
Webvan wrote:
... But it's not just the US, and it's not just language, but critical thinking in general is under assault. ...
Carlin on education.

CCP - Building ant hills and magnifying glasses for fat kids

Not even once

EVE is becoming shallow and puerile; it will satisfy neither the veteran nor the "WoW" type crowd in the transition.

Webvan
All Kill No Skill
#29 - 2015-07-28 13:13:25 UTC
embrel wrote:
Webvan wrote:
Ok, so to answer this question properly: no, in the US, I don't believe we do. Well, maybe there is, but it's hidden away for few to find, for those that even care.


see, a question I assumed to have an obvious answer shows me once more, that assumption is the mother of all ****-ups.

That's news to me. I assumed that in all developed countries, mother-tongue 101 would be part of the curriculum far earlier, because it is with us and our neighboring countries.

However...

Yes, however...

I'm in it for the money

Ctrl+Alt+Shift+F12

Avaelica Kuershin
Paper Cats
#30 - 2015-07-28 13:33:23 UTC
Webvan wrote:
Ok, so to answer this question properly: no, in the US, I don't believe we do. Well, maybe there is, but it's hidden away for few to find, for those that even care. Not only is illiteracy an epidemic, I don't even think that the majority of new teachers really comprehend the language any longer. Schools are falling while entitlement is rising. It's all about how we feel now, and how we need to group think to come to even basic decisions.

But it's not just the US, and it's not just language, but critical thinking in general is under assault. 40 years, no one can even put a man on the moon. Engineers are baffled how it was done. Such low-tech, yet they did it time and time again. Now? All the technological advancements, all the scientific achievements, we can hardly even get a payload into orbit. Devolution, while our computers crank out new stuff that we just don't understand. I'm sure there was a sci-fi book written on it at some point hah.


Webvan's "Decline and Fall of the American Empire"?

I was subjected to Latin for 3 of my high school years.
Mike Whiite
Deep Core Mining Inc.
Caldari State
#31 - 2015-07-28 14:25:42 UTC
Scipio Artelius wrote:
Mike Whiite wrote:
okay I'll bite.

In the Netherlands, people are taught, depending on their education level, 3 to 6 foreign languages before attending university. Welcome in the country of merchants

English being the first, starting as early as the age of 10, though the "real Teachers" are TV and Cinema as most programs and movies are subtitled instead of using voice over and then there is the internet of course.

I guess he's asking a different question.

The Dutch are great with languages (lived in The Hague for 7 years), but he is asking, do you have subjects in School/University that are the equivalent of Dutch 101, Dutch 102, etc.

In school, a lot of English as a first language countries have English, which focuses on grammar, composition, literature, etc.; essentially subjects that teach the rules of communicating formally in English, even though you might think that is something natural because it's the first language of the country.

CAM is asking whether the same sort of thing exists elsewhere. Do Dutch schools have Nederlands 101 that teaches proper grammar, etc.



Really that sounds so natural it wouldn't have come to mind as a question.

ah well still lots of stuff to learn and yes we do have those classes

Zimmy Zeta
Perkone
Caldari State
#32 - 2015-07-28 15:54:45 UTC
Ralph King-Griffin wrote:
Tippia wrote:
What does any of that even mean? Ugh

I suppose that answers the question “no”, but it's hard to tell…

Go easy on her people , it's a genuine question.

From my experience generally European non English speakers tend to have a comparable or better understanding of the English language by the time they enter third level education than most native English speakers use on the internet,
particularly notable with Scandinavians and Germans.
I have a German friend with a better level of English than her Irish boyfriend



Oh hai, non native speaker here Cool

Whenever I read a very poorly written post on the Internet, I wonder if it is a non-native speaker who is simply struggling with the English language or a native speaker too stupid for his own linguistic heritage.

My personal theory is that you can tell them apart by homophone errors : your / you're, it's / its, should have / should of....those errors are only done by native speakers when they just write how they speak. Non-native speakers usually learn it in written form first and speak later, so that kind of errors won't occur.
Another thing, not quite sure about it, is the term "no one". Non native speakers (especially Germans) have the tendency to write it as one word ("noone") while native speakers usually write it as two words.

I'd like to apologize for the poor quality of the post above and sincerely hope you didn't waste your time reading it. Yes, I do feel bad about it.

Tippia
Sunshine and Lollipops
#33 - 2015-07-28 16:18:37 UTC  |  Edited by: Tippia
Zimmy Zeta wrote:
Another thing, not quite sure about it, is the term "no one". Non native speakers (especially Germans) have the tendency to write it as one word ("noone") while native speakers usually write it as two words.

That will vary within English as well. While the OED doesn't always include them, British English has a long history of hyphenating colliding vowels in prefixed and composite word formations, making “no-one” a fairly common occurrence (along with co-operate).

My favourite tip is to take us Scandinavians down a peg is to look for agreement errors. We don't really have number as a factor in our verbs, and thus have a tendency to overlook it in other languages as well. Of course, as the complexity of a sentence increases, it also becomes more difficult for anyone to keep track of the subject, but it'll be far more common for those of us who never have to bother with it on an every-day basis.
Jonah Gravenstein
Machiavellian Space Bastards
#34 - 2015-07-28 16:27:15 UTC
Zimmy Zeta wrote:
Another thing, not quite sure about it, is the term "no one". Non native speakers (especially Germans) have the tendency to write it as one word ("noone") while native speakers usually write it as two words.
That's probably a carry over from the structure of the German language itself, if I remember correctly German has two words for no one, and they're both one word as opposed to the two used in English.

I could be hideously wrong though, my command of German is extremely rusty as I haven't really used it in 25 years.

In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.

New Player FAQ

Feyd's Survival Pack

Zimmy Zeta
Perkone
Caldari State
#35 - 2015-07-28 16:47:59 UTC
Jonah Gravenstein wrote:
Zimmy Zeta wrote:
Another thing, not quite sure about it, is the term "no one". Non native speakers (especially Germans) have the tendency to write it as one word ("noone") while native speakers usually write it as two words.
That's probably a carry over from the structure of the German language itself, if I remember correctly German has two words for no one, and they're both one word as opposed to the two used in English.

I could be hideously wrong though, my command of German is extremely rusty as I haven't really used it in 25 years.

Correct. The corresponding terms in German are both single words: niemand / keiner. Using two words to describe *nothing* sounds illogical for Germans.

@ Tips
Cool stuff. I'll have to watch for those errors in the future.

I'd like to apologize for the poor quality of the post above and sincerely hope you didn't waste your time reading it. Yes, I do feel bad about it.

Jonah Gravenstein
Machiavellian Space Bastards
#36 - 2015-07-28 17:09:26 UTC  |  Edited by: Jonah Gravenstein
Zimmy Zeta wrote:
Correct. The corresponding terms in German are both single words: niemand / keiner. Using two words to describe *nothing* sounds illogical for Germans.
lol you're a nation that insists on making up compound words to describe everyday things, just to troll the rest of the world with the pronunciation and whether or not we can say them without taking a breath Twisted

Which goes to show that contrary to popular belief, Germans do have a sense of humour P

Edit ~
Speed Limits - Geschwindigkeitsbeschränkungen
Someone who wears gloves to throw snowballs - Handschuhschneeballwerfer

In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.

New Player FAQ

Feyd's Survival Pack

Tippia
Sunshine and Lollipops
#37 - 2015-07-28 17:31:51 UTC  |  Edited by: Tippia
Jonah Gravenstein wrote:
lol you're a nation that insists on making up compound words to describe everyday things, just to troll the rest of the world with the pronunciation and whether or not we can say them without taking a breath Twisted

I'd advise you to not try Icelandic of Finnish. P
Vortexo VonBrenner
Doomheim
#38 - 2015-07-28 17:32:22 UTC  |  Edited by: Vortexo VonBrenner
Carrie-Anne Moss wrote:

Do you people in france have like French102 where you read French books and write Position Papers and Critical Analysises?

It's not called English 102 right?

Students in France used to have French 102, but for budgetary reasons, something had to go. So, now it's all only English 102.


An example of proper use of French in travel



EDIT: Wearing gloves to throw snowballs means one can throw more snowballs = win
Johnny Saxton
Pandemic Horde Inc.
Pandemic Horde
#39 - 2015-07-28 17:34:55 UTC
Zimmy Zeta wrote:
Correct. The corresponding terms in German are both single words: niemand / keiner. Using two words to describe *nothing* sounds illogical for Germans.

It's not the words, it's the syllables (Ha! Found that word on the internet).

nie-mand / kei-ner

It's like 'no one', if you don't look at the word count.
Or maybe it's just a thing for illogical Germans.

Jonah Gravenstein wrote:

Which goes to show that contrary to popular belief, Germans do have a sense of humour P


No, we have not.

'I AM FUNNYBOT!'

Johnny
Zimmy Zeta
Perkone
Caldari State
#40 - 2015-07-28 17:36:06 UTC
Jonah Gravenstein wrote:
Zimmy Zeta wrote:
Correct. The corresponding terms in German are both single words: niemand / keiner. Using two words to describe *nothing* sounds illogical for Germans.
lol you're a nation that insists on making up compound words to describe everyday things, just to troll the rest of the world with the pronunciation and whether or not we can say them without taking a breath Twisted

Which goes to show that contrary to popular belief, Germans do have a sense of humour P


Difficulties with pronunciation are often brought up by English speakers, it's actually a point I don't quite understand.
Like, the German language is a complete mess- there are so many exceptions to all grammatic rules that it's getting pretty close to actually having no rules at all. A mouthful of anarchy.
About the only aspect of German that really has comprehensible rules is the pronunciation, everything else is so much worse....


Also, Germans may have a sense of humour, but I don't think there's a typical German humour- it's mostly adopted from foreign countries (Monty Python was a major influence for my generation at least).
Because, you know, a few generations ago, we had a government that did not really like comedians making fun of them, and they were pretty efficient in disposing of all kinds of people they didn't like.
Evolution at work here- speak to older Germans (70+ years) and be awe-strucken by their total absence of humour.

I'd like to apologize for the poor quality of the post above and sincerely hope you didn't waste your time reading it. Yes, I do feel bad about it.