These forums have been archived and are now read-only.

The new forums are live and can be found at https://forums.eveonline.com/

Out of Pod Experience

 
  • Topic is locked indefinitely.
123Next pageLast page
 

Do you foreign people have english class in college?

First post
Author
Carrie-Anne Moss
The Scope
Gallente Federation
#1 - 2015-07-28 04:38:24 UTC
Im in English 102 in summer college class.

Do you people in france have like French102 where you read French books and write Position Papers and Critical Analysises?

It's not called English 102 right?


I only ask here in GD cuz i dont associate with foreign people much except in eve and know that a lot of people in here in General Discussion are from other countries.


Thanks
Rowells
Blackwater USA Inc.
Pandemic Horde
#2 - 2015-07-28 04:46:55 UTC
this man does not represent the rest of US, he is special
Scipio Artelius
Federal Navy Academy
Gallente Federation
#3 - 2015-07-28 04:58:59 UTC  |  Edited by: Scipio Artelius
The important question is, did you skip English 101?
Frostys Virpio
KarmaFleet
Goonswarm Federation
#4 - 2015-07-28 05:00:51 UTC
How about you go ****-post this on reddit?
Infinity Ziona
Sebiestor Tribe
Minmatar Republic
#5 - 2015-07-28 05:04:03 UTC  |  Edited by: Infinity Ziona
"You foreign people" is ambiguous on an international forum.

CCP Fozzie “We can see how much money people are making in nullsec and it is, a gigantic amount, a shit-ton… in null sec anomalies. “*

Kaalrus pwned..... :)

Omar Alharazaad
New Eden Tech Support
#6 - 2015-07-28 05:11:42 UTC
Folks, be gentle.
Not everyone can get into the Special Olympics.

Some have to settle for being Fox News roving reporters.

Come hell or high water, this sick world will know I was here.

ISD Buldath
#7 - 2015-07-28 05:51:55 UTC
Topic Moved to Out of Pod Experience

~ISD Buldath

Instructor King of the Forums! Knight of the General Discussion

Support, Training and Resources Division

Interstellar Services Department

I do not respond to EVE-Mails regarding forum moderation.

embrel
BamBam Inc.
#8 - 2015-07-28 05:56:32 UTC
as I fail to detect the troll: ehm, yes...
Vortexo VonBrenner
Doomheim
#9 - 2015-07-28 06:04:55 UTC
Oh, it's bad way out in those foreign places. I hear in the United Kingdom children are actually forced to take classes in the English language before the university level even. It's slavery, really. They have no choice! It's inhumane!





Webvan
All Kill No Skill
#10 - 2015-07-28 06:43:13 UTC
Wut? Does American count as foreign? Big smile Sometimes you would think so here...
We have English in US colleges. Happily I did not need to take any such classes; was recommended to skip the classes until later University levels. Didn't matter though, I was just in for computer science and some IT stuff. Are you asking for a tutor, CAM? IZ looks eager Smile

I'm in it for the money

Ctrl+Alt+Shift+F12

Ima Wreckyou
The Conference Elite
Safety.
#11 - 2015-07-28 07:19:56 UTC
Hai! I is teeching engisch too mayself, donte neat any stinki klass
Tippia
Sunshine and Lollipops
#12 - 2015-07-28 07:22:30 UTC
What does any of that even mean? Ugh

I suppose that answers the question “no”, but it's hard to tell…
Barrogh Habalu
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#13 - 2015-07-28 07:33:55 UTC  |  Edited by: Barrogh Habalu
Not sure what exactly you are asking about as title doesn't quite match the OP it seems, but whatever.

Here in Russia, as a part of obligatory education program we do study native language for about 10 years, so I guess the answer is yes.

English is a popular choice as a foreign language that is also included in a program. Although quality of teaching may vary, so can willingness and ability of people to learn ofc.

Obviously, children begin to learn languages way earlier in their life, but obviously native language is a no-brainer and the rest is at parents' discretion.

To be honest though, it was one hell of a weird question...
Yourmoney Mywallet
Doomheim
#14 - 2015-07-28 08:19:30 UTC
Mike Whiite
Deep Core Mining Inc.
Caldari State
#15 - 2015-07-28 08:32:31 UTC  |  Edited by: Mike Whiite
okay I'll bite.

In the Netherlands, people are taught, depending on their education level, 3 to 6 foreign languages before attending university. Welcome in the country of merchants

English being the first, starting as early as the age of 10, though the "real Teachers" are TV and Cinema as most programs and movies are subtitled instead of using voice over and then there is the internet of course.
Josef Djugashvilis
#16 - 2015-07-28 09:13:58 UTC
I live in a country jam packed with 'foreigners'

I am an Irishman (happily) living in England.

This is not a signature.

Ralph King-Griffin
New Eden Tech Support
#17 - 2015-07-28 09:28:15 UTC
Tippia wrote:
What does any of that even mean? Ugh

I suppose that answers the question “no”, but it's hard to tell…

Go easy on her people , it's a genuine question.

From my experience generally European non English speakers tend to have a comparable or better understanding of the English language by the time they enter third level education than most native English speakers use on the internet,
particularly notable with Scandinavians and Germans.
I have a German friend with a better level of English than her Irish boyfriend
Azda Ja
Native Freshfood
Minmatar Republic
#18 - 2015-07-28 10:00:46 UTC
Ralph King-Griffin wrote:
Tippia wrote:
What does any of that even mean? Ugh

I suppose that answers the question “no”, but it's hard to tell…

Go easy on her people , it's a genuine question.

From my experience generally European non English speakers tend to have a comparable or better understanding of the English language by the time they enter third level education than most native English speakers use on the internet,
particularly notable with Scandinavians and Germans.
I have a German friend with a better level of English than her Irish boyfriend

It's actually really funny to me how well many germans/ 'nordic' people speak english. They're always modest about it too, they'll answer in perfect english, using words you've only seen in books (hint hint) and say their english 'needs work'. Bullshit, only giveaway for them not being native speakers is the accent.

Grrr.

Webvan
All Kill No Skill
#19 - 2015-07-28 10:19:34 UTC
Ralph King-Griffin wrote:
Go easy on her people , it's a genuine question.
But, it is pretty bad. Just even a little punctuation goes a long way. But I don't usually point that stuff out, unless it's the great wall of text. Like my last GF said, who was an English teacher, almost half my age, "SO WHAT!" /o\
Not my GF anymore P
Kids these days...
pfff

Lol

I'm in it for the money

Ctrl+Alt+Shift+F12

Tippia
Sunshine and Lollipops
#20 - 2015-07-28 10:20:35 UTC  |  Edited by: Tippia
Ralph King-Griffin wrote:
Tippia wrote:
What does any of that even mean? Ugh

I suppose that answers the question “no”, but it's hard to tell…

Go easy on her people , it's a genuine question.

From my experience generally European non English speakers tend to have a comparable or better understanding of the English language by the time they enter third level education than most native English speakers use on the internet,
particularly notable with Scandinavians and Germans.
I have a German friend with a better level of English than her Irish boyfriend

I'm sure it's genuine — it's just so unspecified. It's half a dozen questions at once and it's not clear what it is he really wants to know. As in, what is he actually asking for?

Do we have university courses in Swedish around here? Yes, 50+ of them of various types, excluding courses in general linguistics (that's a separate field) that occasionally use Swedish as an example or point of comparison. Do we have courses in literature studies, logic and argumentation analysis, rhetorics, and practical writing? Yes, but those are language-agnostic and are handled by the literature and philosophy departments. Do we have courses in English, per the title? Yes, 44 of them, not counting the social studies courses that exist in parallel to explain it all (but that probably includes some courses in Old and Middle English, which might be unfair to include — in total we have some 450 language courses so there's a lot of fiddly junk in the course list). Do we have summer courses? Yes, but what's available tends to depend on what departments have teachers (or, more often, PhD students) who want to fill their quota earlier in the year, and on how many students there are that need the extra credits and financing…

What the OP is describing doesn't really sound like any regular course, but rather like the basic writing exercises that are done during the first few weeks of “English A” to get your language synapses warmed up and firing. I'd expect that something similar exists in the “Swedish as a foreign language” set of courses, but being a native speaker, I have no insight into those, and English A presupposes the regular 9+ years of schooling in the language, whereas the Swedish course in question assumes you have no idea how to pronounce “ä”. I suppose that, at a stretch, it might be similar to the introductory logic and rhetorics summer classes that were popular when I took them 10–15 years ago (no idea if they're still around), but again, they were held by the philosophy and lit departments, respectively.
123Next pageLast page