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What would you do with 40 million SP?

Author
Merias Tylar al-Akhwa
Viziam
Amarr Empire
#1 - 2017-06-23 00:47:57 UTC  |  Edited by: Merias Tylar al-Akhwa
I'm posting this here because I feel that this thread might be of interest to new players considering what career path they will embark on. I apologize for the length of this post and thank anyone who makes it to the end and offers their opinion on the matter.


For the past six months I've played this game as a highsec industrialist. Don't get me wrong, I've been pretty good at it- Made just shy of 22 billion ISK net profit through sales, scams, and citadel/POCO real estate gaming so far this year... which I feel is extremely acceptable profit for a solo endeavor. But it's all become so boring and lonely. I've never collaborated with another player, never flown in an actual fleet battle, never had the need to even do anything undocked (mining is for scrubs).There's very little reason for me to cooperate with others in my current position as a businessman; More hands at the table means a smaller slice of the pie.

This has led me to feel like my actions in the game are completely pointless. Success is nothing without company, and I've got plenty of money but nothing to really do with it besides accrue more money. Nothing I do lends itself to a larger goal or motivation. I think highsec (and to a lesser extent lowsec) really breed this sort of atmosphere where the most truly profitable business ventures are taken alone and devoid of friends who might hedge in on your bottom line, in stark contrast to the do-or-die teamwork I've heard of from other areas of the game.

I'm tired of this and I've decided to take the plunge; I'm going to do a total respec of my character and throw off the mantle of industrialist in search of something more exciting and interpersonal. I am currently in the process of selling off my BPO collection and remaining products, as well as my citadels, and have begun investing all my available capital into skill injectors. The sum total of my current SP plus the number of skill injectors I have already purchased is just short of 40 million skill points. I have enough extractors to move around the skillpoints I already have in phases(to get around the requirement that I maintain at least 5.5 million SP when extracting). My question is this:


If you had 40 million unassigned skillpoints and wanted to have fun, what would you spend them on? Where would you go with the skills you picked and who with? What roles can I spend these points in that would be most beneficial to whatever corporation I wind up with?



Thanks a lot for your input. I'd really appreciate hearing from long-time veterans who've seen more of the game than I have, and might have a better picture of where to go from here.
Merias Tylar al-Akhwa
Viziam
Amarr Empire
#2 - 2017-06-23 01:14:29 UTC
I'll spice this up a bit too: The person I feel gave me the most helpful answer will receive a free skill injector, contracted to the alt of their choosing.
Memphis Baas
#3 - 2017-06-23 02:07:04 UTC  |  Edited by: Memphis Baas
You can break up a long term skill training plan into 1-year periods, and they roughly correspond to 20 million skillpoints each.

The primary reason for the 1-year period is because you can re-spec your attributes every year, oscillating between int/mem and per/wil. This maximizes the number of skill points you get per month, provided that you focus on support and core skills (int/mem) for a whole year, and on ship and weapon skills (per/wil) also for a whole year.

If you look at the skills, T2 ships require some of the core / support skills trained to 5, so if you want to unlock these ships, you need to spend some time in int/mem mode, training supports, before switching to per/wil for the ships and the weapons.

Now, your skill injectors allow you to bypass some of this early training time. My recommendation would be to put points into the support skills (engineering, navigation, armor, shields, targeting, etc. etc.). Take them to 4, take the few that are prerequisites for T2 ships to 5 (to meet the prerequisites).

You can also put some points into drones, just to ensure that you can use 5 drones for the ships that have them. And some points into Trade (50 or so orders on the market should help you sell your junk, also some into contracts so you can set more than 2 contracts, some points into infomorph psychology for clone jumping, etc.)

This kinda leaves you with none of the ships trained, and that's part of the recommendation, because you want to start with the cheap ships (frigates), and actually USE them to learn PVP before you unlock the more expensive ships and lose them.

So this plan will get your support skills ready and out of the way, so that when you unlock new ships you already have the top armor, shields, etc. for them.

It'll feel like you're basically start the game from scratch, though. Like a newbie all over again. Don't know if that's your thing.

EDIT: Corps don't really hire based on what capabilities you have; any skill or ship that's needed can easily be trained by one of their members. Recruitment happens based on personality and trust. If you want to have fun, I'd recommend trying to join a corp in lowsec, null, or wormhole space; it's not guaranteed that you'll find an excellent corp in the lower security space, it's just that high-sec corps tend to suck big time.
Redus Taw
Hotaru.
Order of Allied Knights
#4 - 2017-06-23 02:35:48 UTC
I haven't been playing the game that long compared to most, but I'd say its pretty clear that you answered your own question actually. If "fun" is your main focus then spend 5-10 million sp's across a few different areas of the game you might find fun and try them all out and see what you like the most. Once you've found something of interest, put more and more sp's into it. For me personally I like to spread things out between making isk and having fun. I'd put about 10 million towards pvp, 5 million in trade, 5 million in exploration, 5 million in pi. Then just continue playing and see what I like and I'll put the points towards that.
ergherhdfgh
Imperial Academy
Amarr Empire
#5 - 2017-06-23 02:54:54 UTC
This game is much more about what you know and a lot less about the skill points that your character has.

You won't be successful at space combat until you get experience and once you have the experience you will know which skills will do you the most good. So just get out there and get involved and don't worry about the skill points.

You could be very well skilled in all small T1 ships in this game for a lot less than 40 million skill points. Further I think that you are better off spending isk on a large stable of disposable ships than a whole bunch of skill injectors. So you are better off ( in my opinion ) spending the isk on things that will actually get you combat experience.

Suitonia's eveiseasy youtube channel
has a lot of videos of him ( an experienced PvP vet ) winning a lot of solo fights on days old alts going up against years old characters.

Buying skill points will just make you a crappy PvP pilot with a lot of skill points. Where as if you get the experience you can be a good and successful PvP pilot with very few skill points ( which Suitonia has proven repeatedly ) so it is up to you which you'd rather be.

Want to talk? Join Cara's channel in game: House Forelli

Francis Raven
ExDominion
Evictus.
#6 - 2017-06-23 03:21:54 UTC
What do you enjoy? We can't tell you what you like.

EVE is a social game first. Find a nice group of guys in a corp and follow them around. Nullsec and wormhole corporations are very active as they need to be in order to survive.

Spend you SP on something you enjoy. If that was industry, get that SP back in there. If you want to dabble in PVP and PVE a bit, then join a group, see what their doctrines are, then train into that.

With your experience, I would tell you to keep down the indy path, but do it on a alliance or coalition level. Build some sandcastles down in nullsec.

ExDominion | Nullsec Corporation | Website | Forums | Established Nov. 2015 |

Francis Raven
ExDominion
Evictus.
#7 - 2017-06-23 03:26:37 UTC
Francis Raven wrote:
What do you enjoy? We can't tell you what you like.

EVE is a social game first. Find a nice group of guys in a corp and follow them around. Nullsec and wormhole corporations are very active as they need to be in order to survive.

Spend you SP on something you enjoy. If that was industry, get that SP back in there. If you want to dabble in PVP and PVE a bit, then join a group, see what their doctrines are, then train into that.

With your experience, I would tell you to keep down the indy path, but do it on a alliance or coalition level. Build some sandcastles down in nullsec.


Some Roles To Benefit Corps
• Jumpfreighting
• PVP (logi or mainline) skills depend on doctrines however cruisers are always used. (many alliances in nullsec have HAC doctrines)
• Wormholes: Exploration skills will be critical.
• Command Destroyers: Always used in nullsec.

ExDominion | Nullsec Corporation | Website | Forums | Established Nov. 2015 |

Merias Tylar al-Akhwa
Viziam
Amarr Empire
#8 - 2017-06-23 05:25:11 UTC
I'd like to thank everyone who's posted so far- Lots of food for thought!

Francis Raven wrote:
What do you enjoy? We can't tell you what you like.

...

With your experience, I would tell you to keep down the indy path, but do it on a alliance or coalition level. Build some sandcastles down in nullsec.


This idea kind of appeals to me in a big way. I started the industrial path in the first place because I enjoy numbers and find the idea of building things neat. If I could find a way to keep doing something like what I am doing, but cooperatively with others in pursuit of larger alliance goals, I could see it working out very well for me. I may also look into learning the ins and outs of Jump Freighters to add some utility in what I bring to the table, as suggested in your second post.
JuuR Zibaoo
Akimamur Industries
The Rogue Consortium
#9 - 2017-06-23 07:20:45 UTC
1st: i would look for a corp to join .. maybe a indy/bit of everything corp so you can still build some stuff for the cashflow and learn new stuff
2nd: what is fun for you? missions? exploring? pvp? pve? eve has so many stuff so its not easy to say what is your eve
3rd: !!dont waste your skillpoints!! you can have mission/pve fun with T1 ships .. as long as you have good "Engeneering" skills .. a bit into a weaponsystem you prefer .. corpfriends kan help you with that .. thats what a corp is for .. help each other and have fun together
4th: do something stupid .. eve is not a 100% serios game .. you talk with friends and then go for a roam maybe .. 20 millions ship and get a battle .. boom .. lol .. trashtalk on TS .. thats all eve .. eve is what you make .. at least for me but maybe i am wrong ..

ok .. and if you like what you read here .. write me ingame or a message .. i think we find something for you

JuuR
Memphis Baas
#10 - 2017-06-23 10:34:21 UTC  |  Edited by: Memphis Baas
Merias Tylar al-Akhwa wrote:
This idea kind of appeals to me in a big way. I started the industrial path in the first place because I enjoy numbers and find the idea of building things neat. If I could find a way to keep doing something like what I am doing, but cooperatively with others in pursuit of larger alliance goals, I could see it working out very well for me. I may also look into learning the ins and outs of Jump Freighters to add some utility in what I bring to the table, as suggested in your second post.


The game mechanics already exist: corporation hangars can be secured to allow manufacturing from corp blueprints using corp-owned materials, you just need to be given the proper roles within the corp.

What you need is:

1. Find a good corp.
2. Build up the trust so they let you do that stuff.

Obviously they won't unlock their blueprints to anyone who just joined. And if you're thinking of manufacturing from your own blueprints for their benefit, make sure you're in a good corp so they don't try to scam your blueprints away.

EDIT: I didn't manufacture for a corp, but I did do some logistics. It's probably not going to be a full time job, simply because you set up your manufacture lines and they go (by themselves). You'll likely still get to (and be expected to) participate in their organized operations, be it organized fleets / raids, home defense, or full-blown wars.
Jikai
Doomheim
#11 - 2017-06-23 14:01:21 UTC
You don't need to respec at all.

Plenty of nullsec corps will gladly take capsuleers specializing in mining, research, manufacturing, and logistics (fueling/freighting).

These roles are the backbone of any large nullsec group. And there are many others who do the same who you can share company.

Good luck in the path that you choose. If you do respec, I recommend not spending all the SP at once - just toe into new roles and invest further if you enjoy them.

Francis Raven
ExDominion
Evictus.
#12 - 2017-06-23 14:27:08 UTC
Merias Tylar al-Akhwa wrote:
I'd like to thank everyone who's posted so far- Lots of food for thought!

Francis Raven wrote:
What do you enjoy? We can't tell you what you like.

...

With your experience, I would tell you to keep down the indy path, but do it on a alliance or coalition level. Build some sandcastles down in nullsec.


This idea kind of appeals to me in a big way. I started the industrial path in the first place because I enjoy numbers and find the idea of building things neat. If I could find a way to keep doing something like what I am doing, but cooperatively with others in pursuit of larger alliance goals, I could see it working out very well for me. I may also look into learning the ins and outs of Jump Freighters to add some utility in what I bring to the table, as suggested in your second post.


Many mid to large alliances are looking for people to help run their indy department. This would involve overseeing production, buyback programs, and logistics. These people work with the alliance's assets as opposed to their own, and can create HUGE things such as capital and supercapitals, structure networks, doctrine supply, etc... With that role, you are also able to work on your own personal industry with many more tools at your disposal - higher value ores, more people to do a personal buyback from, infrastructure with low-to-zero taxes.

For example, we have someone who oversees the industry side of things for us in nullsec. His toon is only ~10m SP, however it's focused on Indy and research. He also manages other industrial pilots within the corp and the alliance to make sure our production and sales targets are hit. He does capital building on the side for his own personal profits, but will use our infrastructure to do so. We then buy caps from him, or he sells elsewhere.


ExDominion | Nullsec Corporation | Website | Forums | Established Nov. 2015 |

Mike Azariah
The Scope
Gallente Federation
#13 - 2017-06-23 14:46:31 UTC
Train forward,don't slide back.

Keep the skills, the loss due to diminishing returns are, well hell, if you are an industrialist I assume you can do the math yourself.

Find a corp, big or small and learn. Maybe start out in one of the big three, Karma, Brave, or Horde and learn pvp from the ground up and skill as you go. If they will take brand new players then you are a brand new pvp player with a lot of secondary skills.

from there? Rise to the top or if you decide that road is not for you at least you have a career to fall back on.

m

Mike Azariah  ┬──┬ ¯|(ツ)

Sara Starbuck
Adamantine Creations
#14 - 2017-06-23 14:56:11 UTC
Firstly you do know you lose like 20% of your SP while shuffling around?

That aside i would dump like 7M into drones for starters due to the silly mix of MEM/PER they have, i think everything else is said, putting stuff into the always needed coreskills and such. With 40M you can get wellrounded char to do pretty much anything combat related.
Chainsaw Plankton
FaDoyToy
#15 - 2017-06-23 20:36:58 UTC
Mike Azariah wrote:
Train forward,don't slide back.

Keep the skills, the loss due to diminishing returns are, well hell, if you are an industrialist I assume you can do the math yourself.

Find a corp, big or small and learn. Maybe start out in one of the big three, Karma, Brave, or Horde and learn pvp from the ground up and skill as you go. If they will take brand new players then you are a brand new pvp player with a lot of secondary skills.

from there? Rise to the top or if you decide that road is not for you at least you have a career to fall back on.

m

It might make sense to extract some of the stuff as 40m in industry is a lot of SP. my industry character has something like 12m dedicated to production, science, and resource processing skills. but I agree with keeping a decent portion of it. It is always easy to do some industry stuff anywhere you end up. always good to have an income source.

For sure inject the core skills, and then work on some frig/cruiser skills A lot of affordable and accessible pvp is at the frig/destroyer/cruiser level. Figure out what you want to do and consider injecting more to get there later.

@ChainsawPlankto on twitter

Louis Blade
#16 - 2017-06-24 05:40:25 UTC
If you've 40 mil SP, and want to spice up your eve life, I would recommend training up your core engineering skills and get Lvl III mastery of a T2 Cruiser/Dessie/frigate. Any race is good, just find something that makes you feel like the captain of Battlestar Galactica.

The next step is to find a small group of good people and go roaming in low-sec, ganking plexers and piracy is real fun. You'll enjoy every moment of it, from getting salt from unsuspecting nerds to bounties getting placed on you. Also, don't forget about the adrenaline rush when you see someone light up a cyno or when you and your team jump into a gate-camp.

Good fight will ensure and soon you'll feel confident enough to go solo roam. However, when that happens, make sure you do it in a T1 cruiser/dessie/frig only. You'll probably welp a lot of ships before actually getting any good solo kills.

Whatever you do, just DON'T do these:-
1. Extract your market skills, you'll get a lot of random stuff from wrecks and you'll have to sell them off.
2. Completely ignore industry, pvp is always a costly business, you'll need some passive industry to fund it.
3. Buy capitals - Just doesn't fit the entire theme of small group roams, but it's a matter of personal preference. If you really like mining salt, you can and your friends can easily drop caps on anything.
4. Join a big ass corp, again a matter of personal preference. But a 100 man F1 roaming fleet is no fun, as compared to small fleets of 5-10 people. Of course if you like gigantic battles with TiDi or blowing up citadels do join Horde/Brave/Karma...etc. (Who am I to say, I'm in horde myself P)

People will suggest all kinds of career path but I'm telling you if you really want to interact with other people and enjoy the community, PvP is the way to go. You might even FC one day. Other options like Exploration, PvE, PI are all good but they are all solo business.
BearThatCares
Krypted Gaming
#17 - 2017-06-25 00:41:16 UTC
1. ISK Method (Ratting/Exploration/Mining)
2. Core Skills
3. PvP

Krypted Gaming is looking for quality members!

Check out our guides at our website, and if you like what you see, drop by our Discord and socialize!

Louis Blade
#18 - 2017-07-02 20:02:13 UTC
So who got the skill injector? Twisted
Fluffy Moe
Royal Amarr Institute
Amarr Empire
#19 - 2017-07-02 20:19:54 UTC
Merias Tylar al-Akhwa wrote:
I'm posting this here because I feel that this thread might be of interest to new players considering what career path they will embark on. I apologize for the length of this post and thank anyone who makes it to the end and offers their opinion on the matter.


For the past six months I've played this game as a highsec industrialist. Don't get me wrong, I've been pretty good at it- Made just shy of 22 billion ISK net profit through sales, scams, and citadel/POCO real estate gaming so far this year... which I feel is extremely acceptable profit for a solo endeavor. But it's all become so boring and lonely. I've never collaborated with another player, never flown in an actual fleet battle, never had the need to even do anything undocked (mining is for scrubs).There's very little reason for me to cooperate with others in my current position as a businessman; More hands at the table means a smaller slice of the pie.

This has led me to feel like my actions in the game are completely pointless. Success is nothing without company, and I've got plenty of money but nothing to really do with it besides accrue more money. Nothing I do lends itself to a larger goal or motivation. I think highsec (and to a lesser extent lowsec) really breed this sort of atmosphere where the most truly profitable business ventures are taken alone and devoid of friends who might hedge in on your bottom line, in stark contrast to the do-or-die teamwork I've heard of from other areas of the game.

I'm tired of this and I've decided to take the plunge; I'm going to do a total respec of my character and throw off the mantle of industrialist in search of something more exciting and interpersonal. I am currently in the process of selling off my BPO collection and remaining products, as well as my citadels, and have begun investing all my available capital into skill injectors. The sum total of my current SP plus the number of skill injectors I have already purchased is just short of 40 million skill points. I have enough extractors to move around the skillpoints I already have in phases(to get around the requirement that I maintain at least 5.5 million SP when extracting). My question is this:


If you had 40 million unassigned skillpoints and wanted to have fun, what would you spend them on? Where would you go with the skills you picked and who with? What roles can I spend these points in that would be most beneficial to whatever corporation I wind up with?



Thanks a lot for your input. I'd really appreciate hearing from long-time veterans who've seen more of the game than I have, and might have a better picture of where to go from here.


I'd train up recon crusiers (with their respective ECM type skills), T3 cruisers, (1 armor 1 shield based) and 1 BS and go full combat, both PvP and PvE. Possibly also frigs for burner missions.
Tyrrell Caitiff
University of Caille
Gallente Federation
#20 - 2017-07-04 15:58:20 UTC  |  Edited by: Tyrrell Caitiff
Sounds like you've got some valuable experience - how about training rookies? I'm quite interested in learning non-violent ways to privateer in EVE.
BTW you sound like the accountant who wants to hunt lions in that Monty Python's sketch. Don't you think you'll have more fun with fellow accountants? ;-)
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