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Tell us about your home planet.

Author
Loai Qerl
Societas Imperialis Sceptri Coronaeque
#1 - 2017-03-18 00:15:24 UTC  |  Edited by: Loai Qerl
I hope you'll forgive me if I don't launch straight away into an account of my own home planet, and the part of it where I grew up, and all its weather and plants and animals and usual clothes and other customary things. I could do it, I could write books about Jachanu V, but I want to know the little things about YOUR home. Where you grew up, what seemed normal that turned out to be strange, what the food is like, what you'd like to return to someday? What feels like home, when you find it somewhere else.

I would also like very much to hear about this if it was not a planet at all, but a station. Or some other thing in space. That's a thing so strange to me and I would love so much to know the little familiar details that made it HOME to you.

Won't you tell us a little something about it? Please.


Directory of Accounts

Planets
Eifer VI (Ereka Nihil)
Jachanu V (Loai Qerl)
Achura (Gwen Ikiryo)
Achura (Aria Jenneth)
Matar, Mikramurka coast (Elsebeth Rhiannon)
Unnamed Planet (Diana Kim)
Iyen-Oursta VII (Gwen Ikiryo)
Danera V (Tamiroth)
Kaztropol (Queen Synthia)
Gelfiven VIII (Hetu Hegirin)
Korama IV (Utari Onzo)
Roundish (Tyrel Toov)
Skarkon II (Elmund Egivand)
Satama, New Icousa (Korsavius)
Vey II - Maatrukanaan (Persephone Allleile)
Intaki (Herzog Wolfhammer)
Luminaire (Gwion Achasse)
Marthia V (Kador Ouryon)
Asakai III (Jennifer Maxwell)
Unnamed Planet, Anoikis (Lauralite Anne Brezia)
Unnamed Gallente Planet (Mizhir)
Unnamed Domed Colony (Lunarisse Aspenstar)
Bourynes II (Jason Galente)
Chaven III (Casserina Leshrac)
Onga IV (Kalaratiri)


Stations
Unnamed Station (Bjorn Tyrson)
Abagawa VIII, Moon 4, Peace and Order unit station (Pieter Tuulinen)
Huggar Station, Pator III Moon 2 Republic Security Services Assembly Plant (Arrendis Culome)
Unnamed Station, Alenia (Myxx)
Unnamed Station (Aradina Varren)
Refueling Station (Claudia Osyn)


Ships
The Veszith Wreathe-class trading ship (Victoria Grey)

Other
Not a small fishing vessel (Utsukushi Shi)
Hell (Veikitamo Gesakaarin)
Hunting (Raxi Elamp)
Warm and dry (Halcyon Ember)
Space! (Rhoxy Runekin)
Bjorn Tyrson
Decompression Theory
Digital Vendetta
#2 - 2017-03-18 00:53:06 UTC
Grew up as a station rat in the ass end of curse. Daddy was a drug addict mama was a prostitute. Yada Yada. Insert whatever ****** story you want here and it's probably pretty close. Slept in forgotten corners and access tunes more often than not. Spent my days dodging security and trying to pinch and sell what I could to afford food. Never got in too much trouble though, at least nothing bad enough to earn more than a through beating.

Saw an opportunity to get out and I took it. Been back to the area once or twice since then, might move back some day. But for now I'm enjoying stretching my wings and seeing what's all out there
Mizhara Del'thul
Coreli Corporation
Mercenary Coalition
#3 - 2017-03-18 00:54:27 UTC
Hmm. Now you have me daydreaming about growing up on one's home planet. What it'd be like to be both a child, and home. I know it's not exactly an answer on the topic, but you've pointed out something in me I haven't explored in myself. I'll have to think about this one for a while.
Ereka Nihil
Faded Light
#4 - 2017-03-18 01:09:36 UTC
Eifer VI, here. Cold little snowball of a planet, barely habitable by most definitions, especially the further you get away from the equator. Low atmospheric pressure, lots of snow and ice, you get the idea.

Not great if you're stuck outdoors, but inside a habitat with redundant heating systems, hydroponics gardens, and a solid energy source? Nice and cozy, even on the coldest and windiest of days. Like being in space, in many ways, the unforgiving nature of the landscape encourages discipline and creative thinking, or at least I think so in any event.

As to why anyone would live on an iceball on the edge of lowsec Matari space? Not a lot of people around, if you get my drift. A few small Matari populations here and there, some close enough to home you could walk to on-foot given a few hours and some willpower, but nothing really important of note.

Would I like to go back someday? Of course, and I do so regularly to visit the parents (who are still alive to this day, thank you very much). Certainly a nice respite from the hustle and bustle of space.
Loai Qerl
Societas Imperialis Sceptri Coronaeque
#5 - 2017-03-18 01:42:51 UTC  |  Edited by: Loai Qerl
It seems to have been very cold where so many of you grew up. I'm sorry. Really I am.

Mizhara Del'thul wrote:
Now you have me daydreaming about growing up on one's home planet. What it'd be like to be both a child, and home.


And this makes me very sad. I hope you can find some comfort in this thread. Even if it's only a secondhand home feeling. I hope it helps, in some way.
Ereka Nihil
Faded Light
#6 - 2017-03-18 01:59:23 UTC
Pfft, give me a cold planet any day. I much prefer freezing wind and all that harshness to being surrounded by plants, animals... bugs! Seriously, how do you heat-lovers stand the thought of so many tiny insects crawling around in the underbrush, just waiting to introduce themselves to you?

No thank you.
Bjorn Tyrson
Decompression Theory
Digital Vendetta
#7 - 2017-03-18 02:07:32 UTC
Ereka Nihil wrote:
Pfft, give me a cold planet any day. I much prefer freezing wind and all that harshness to being surrounded by plants, animals... bugs! Seriously, how do you heat-lovers stand the thought of so many tiny insects crawling around in the underbrush, just waiting to introduce themselves to you?

No thank you.


Agreed 100%

I would rather be to cold than too hot any day. I can always add more layers. But there is only so much I can strip off.

I remember one time the stations AC broke down. And it took months for the engineers to fix it.

Got so damn hot that I had to shave myself head to toe just to sleep at night. In fact the bald look became super popular for a while.

Loai Qerl
Societas Imperialis Sceptri Coronaeque
#8 - 2017-03-18 03:28:42 UTC  |  Edited by: Loai Qerl
Oh FINE. You lot love the cold so much, obviously it is time to tell you about Jachanu V!

It is hot. No one argues that. It is hot and most of the planet that isn't polar lives near water; fortunately. there is a lot of water. Water in the sun is very pretty, and water also has fish in it. We ate a lot of fish. We were in the northeastern part of the northern continent. A very temperate part. Many fish. Many wonderful juicy plants and good brackish land for crops; when I left for Academy we had switched to saavice (a sugar berry) for short-term financial reasons, but before the saavice there were jama. Beautiful vines that coiled and fell back on themselves to make trees, more or less. Huge red flowers like paper, big enough to fit your head in and lick the stamen (do NOT say rude things about this) and leaves like green stained glass. A smell a bit like cat urine, unfortunately. Something in jama has medical application; I woudn't know.

Anyway. Green. Liquid. Fish. Beautiful colors. Sweating all the time of course, but not minding it because you wear one layer of something that dries quickly. And you can swim, also, and that's a little cooler.

Most of the drinks have salt in. A little. It's important. Having something that was JUST sweet with no salt didn't happen until I left for school, and it tasted wrong. Flat.

Also, I have not been on one stupid station where I don't have to wear thick clothes AND a coat AND a wrap most of the time. I'm getting used to it but it is still a little awful.

....but warm is still home, and so is salt.

ANYWAY this is why I want to hear about you all, really. Because snow and awful, and station, and...well, the living in supply corridors. That too.
Gwen Ikiryo
Alexylva Paradox
#9 - 2017-03-18 04:00:39 UTC
I'm from Achura. There are lots of rocks everywhere, and sometimes the weather decides it hates you and destroys everything you love. SuVee also owns most of the major cities, so everything is really overpriced and kind of sucks.

Looks pretty, though.
Elsebeth Rhiannon
SoE Roughriders
Electus Matari
#10 - 2017-03-18 06:32:00 UTC
Born in space in fact, but that was a fluke of my parents' misspent youth.

Home was on Mikramurka coast on Matar. Four seasons with windy summers and enough snow in the winter (though not as much as the snoweaters north of us). The area I am from is flat, kind of rocky and rather dry, compared to the farmlands inland, where the rain is stopped by the mountains.

For someone from Matar, the question "tell me about a planet" is kinda silly. It's a planet. I haven't seen most of it, and even the regions I have seen are quite varied; you only have to travel 100 km from Rhiannon proper and the scenery can change completely.
Diana Kim
State Protectorate
Caldari State
#11 - 2017-03-18 06:56:12 UTC
Temperate class planet, 3rd from the sun. Average temperature 4 degrees (277K). Orbit period 73 days. Surface gravity 11.3 m/s².

Our family has left the planet when I was very young and my memories about it are quite short. Probably the most vivid of them is actually seeing the planet in the illuminator of the shuttle, how it was becoming smaller and smaller and finally has disappeared. I never saw it again before I became a capsuleer.

Honored are the dead, for their legacy guides us.

In memory of Tibus Heth, Caldari State Executor YC110-115, Hero and Patriot.

Aria Jenneth
Societas Imperialis Sceptri Coronaeque
#12 - 2017-03-18 07:16:17 UTC  |  Edited by: Aria Jenneth
Gwen Ikiryo wrote:
I'm from Achura. There are lots of rocks everywhere, and sometimes the weather decides it hates you and destroys everything you love. SuVee also owns most of the major cities, so everything is really overpriced and kind of sucks.

Looks pretty, though.


Sometimes it's the wind. Sometimes it's the ground. Sometimes it's the rain. Sometimes it's the sea.

Live life while you have it. Learn what you can, and understand what you see. When calamity comes, what you know is all you can be sure you'll keep, and all that will keep you and yours safe. Know where to build, and why, and when to leave. If you value your house, you'll lose your life defending it.

That world is to us what Caldari Prime was to the Caldari: a teacher. Even today, rural Achura know not to value possessions too highly. Things, and people, and even places, are transient.

But Caldari metal towers aren't easily shaken, beaten, or blown down. They, and our "uplifted" kin, don't learn the same lessons we do. They prepare for harsh winters that aren't harsh, hoard wealth against bad harvests as though Achura were going to try to freeze and starve them to death like Caldari Prime instead of drowning, crushing, or blowing them away. (Their cities really are pretty admirably durable, though.)

The Caldari do recognize us as kin-- poor cousins, really. It's a lot of why we still have most of the planet. Our communities are small. We fish and farm. We tinker, study, and teach. We trade with the Caldari. Our leaders are the insightful: fortune-tellers, who know how to read people better than stars; inventors, who find inspiration in the patterns and interactions of the universe; monks-- maybe the most reluctant theocracy in the cluster, seeking to perfect their souls while trying to rule what's left of our civilization after the uplift.

We don't have a lot of power, but we don't really kill each other very much anymore. Nobody plucks anyone's eyelashes to make brushes, except in period dramas.

We make a lot of our own stuff. The really expensive things are mostly imported, stuff we have to trade with SuVee for.

In most places the mountains press right up against the water. ... I think I always lived close to the sea. Things might be a little different further inland. The mountains get really high, and there are colder regions where maybe winter really does try to freeze you, instead of bringing in storm after storm.

I wish I could remember it at all. I wish I could remember a day there, even if it was an awful day.
Gwen Ikiryo
Alexylva Paradox
#13 - 2017-03-18 07:55:43 UTC
Aria Jenneth wrote:
Nobody plucks anyone's eyelashes to make brushes, except in period dramas.


Hey, speak for yourself. I've made three eyebrushes from my defeated enemies just this week.
Pieter Tuulinen
Itsukame-Zainou Hyperspatial Inquiries Ltd.
Arataka Research Consortium
#14 - 2017-03-18 09:23:05 UTC
I wasn't born at all and my home wasn't even a planet that you could walk on.

I was decanted on the tenth of January, YC 093 aboard the Peace and Order Unit station orbiting the fourth moon of the eighth world of the Abagawa system. This isn't a rocky planet, it's an enormous Gas Giant of a world that comes equipped with three asteroid belts and six moons!

I was part of a creche of one hundred little Civire who were all from batch 6 of series 14596. We were housed in a single barracks, growing up, divided up into rooms of ten. I slept in bunkbeds while we were at the creche. At fifteen I went off for vocational training and from that time I was housed in a regular single male barracks. We had single beds at that time, which felt like a huge luxury, because I had a top bunk as a kid and it took me six months to stop rolling out of bed without sitting up first.

The station was pretty much like all Suvee stations. We had less Achura than you would get at Saisio - but we had way more Achura than you'd get at, say, a Lai Dai station. That meant that as well as regular Caldari and Napaani, I grew up speaking conversational Achura. It was a useful skill in my vocation.

The station has its administrative offices around the core, with the barracks and retail/office spaces on the side closest to the planet and the utility and infrastructure on the space-side of the station. When I did a rotation learning the ropes to become a detective, I actually worked in the core and I quite liked it there - although some of the spaces are a little cramped, because core real-estate is more expensive. There are, however, some open spaces in the core with actual trees and grass and so forth. I used to eat my lunch on a bench under a stand of trees when I wasn't slammed with work.

Caldari stations are typically a little colder than visitors would prefer - especially Achur. Now that I think of it, it was probably a little mean of us not to accomodate our Achur staff. They all came from Saisio and it took them quite some time to acclimate to the standard temperature. You could heat your quarters to any temperature you preferred - but the further away from the baseline temperature the more it cost you to do so.

We did have a lot of Achur food on the station. One of the senior patrol officers that guided me through my period as a cadet was married to an Achur woman and he used to insist on Achur food a couple of times a week. You'd think he'd want to eat regular food more, since I'm sure he got Achur food a lot at home, but I never did get around to asking him about it.

I used to watch the storms on the surface of the planet, quite often - especially during my sleep cycle. I once heard that the sound of storms is soothing, but when I got someone in astronomy to get me a recording of the storms on Abagawa VIII I found that actually they made me tense, rather than relaxing me.

For the first time since I started the conversation, he looks me dead in the eye. In his gaze are steel jackhammers, quiet vengeance, a hundred thousand orbital bombs frozen in still life.

Gwen Ikiryo
Alexylva Paradox
#15 - 2017-03-18 10:12:57 UTC  |  Edited by: Gwen Ikiryo
I don't like to talk about Achura, really (at the moment, I probably would rather not even think about it) but I'll speak about another world I considered home for a while when I was in school: Iyen-Oursta VII, at the Caldari-Gallente border zone.

Physically, it is not a very remarkable planet. It is not too hot or too cold. It barely has seasons. The only real weather events are light wind and vaguely depressing drizzle. And it is very flat. If I had to define it by some characteristic, it would be "kind of swampy", or in other parts "grassy", because the soil is a little shallow, which prevents anything interesting from growing. It's the sort of world the gods would make if they were having a development crunch and had to kind of phone it in.

Most people know the system for it's strategic importance during the war, or the spooky lights that appear around the stargate sometimes. I hadn't actually heard about either of these things when I moved there, having spent most of my life up until my teens on the homeworld, and not yet having developed much of a passion for history. My dad, who was an Ishukone employee at the time (he was later sacked for embezzling tons of money as a response to Heth's purge of the executives) moved us there when he took up a position in the management of a large, corporate-run factory district that Ishukone had opened as part of a cross-investment plan with the local Federal government, at the height of the peaceful era. Though I went to a good school and we lived in easily the most upmarket part of the city, it was still a bit grim. Fairly plain architecture, not all that much to see or do...

When I got there, I was not really impressed.

But slowly, I realized something.

Iyen-Oursta was, of course, a Federal system with Federal laws, but it's history and location meant it was filled with Caldari expatriates, some still part of the State who were merely there for work, and others who had left it behind. I had been around the northern cluster at that point, on holidays or for other stupid reasons. I'd seen Caldari being Caldari and Gallente being Gallente - Or at least I thought I had, since I learned later that Gallente can actually mean about a billion different things - and the way the other "side" was regarded in both; Lack of understanding, at best, and outright hatred at worst. So what I'd expected to find there was a lot of tension.

But it wasn't like that at all.

It wasn't like culture evaporated into a mist of cosmopolitan mush, though I'm not sure I'm the kind of person who would even especially get upset by that if it had. People just... Got on. National myths, grudges, all of it sort of just fell the wayside in the wake of people living together and sharing their experiences. Everybody had Gallente friends, Caldari friends, even Matari and Amarr friends, and just didn't think about it. Old hatreds became just little jokes people would throw around, like they were something that had happened in another universe.

Honestly, it was probably the best place I've ever lived. I wouldn't mind if the whole cluster was like that, and I'm not sure I'll ever truly understand, on a deep level, the apparent majority of people who would.
Tamiroth
Societas Imperialis Sceptri Coronaeque
#16 - 2017-03-18 14:53:57 UTC  |  Edited by: Tamiroth
Loai Qerl wrote:
I hope you'll forgive me if I don't launch straight away into an account of my own home planet, and the part of it where I grew up, and all its weather and plants and animals and usual clothes and other customary things. I could do it, I could write books about Jachanu V, but I want to know the little things about YOUR home. Where you grew up, what seemed normal that turned out to be strange, what the food is like, what you'd like to return to someday? What feels like home, when you find it somewhere else.

I would also like very much to hear about this if it was not a planet at all, but a station. Or some other thing in space. That's a thing so strange to me and I would love so much to know the little familiar details that made it HOME to you.

Won't you tell us a little something about it? Please.


I was born on Danera V. This world was once a smallish ice planet with little to no atmosphere. When the Empire began to colonize the region that was to become Khanid, they chose between Danera II and V as possible terraforming projects. Danera V, while receiving much less sunlight than II, had enormous deposits of water, and that sealed its fate. Danera II still stands barren. Even though the terraforming was launched there as well, it still has several hundred years left to completion.

Thus, the world I was born to is a fake, artificial one. The rings of atmospheric processors around the poles keep the air breathable and support the greenhouse effect that enables the comfortable average temperatures of ~18 C near the equator, but the planet is still too far away from our sun. Should the immense ancient citadels buried in ice stop breathing, within the next few decades our world will revert into the dead glacier-covered wasteland. That was one of my main childhood fears. But then, i learned about the Caldari, and the fears were gone. They did it. They survived. And we will survive too!

The gravity here is slightly above half standard. The air feels like high in the mountains. There is perpetual twilight, and our eyes grow adapted to it. Everything is similar. Everywhere you go, you find the same few species of gen-modded crops, grass, bushes and trees, the same few species of insects and bacteria. There are no "larger" animals except humans, their livestock and their pets. Even during the day, you can see brighter stars and the tiny sickle of our moon, and sometimes even the Vapor Sea. Our year lasts about 5 calendar cycles. It's a long year, but we are used to it.

For a foreign visitor, Danera V leaves a strange feeling that it's a setting of some VR game, a world that was procedurally generated from a few asset blocks. Too orderly, too neat, everything is the same wherever you go - but yet different.

Perhaps, it helps us, the colonists, to learn the truth about the universe: what seems to be an infinitely diverse colorful chaos is in fact not. There is an underlying order in everything.

There's just more variety in building blocks and how they fit together.

P.S. A fun fact: I've just learned that a few species of our "wild" (well, introduced, of course) birds are DNA-related to the bird family that lives on Caldari Prime and is prominent in Caldari culture. They even have ships named after those birds, like the Raven, the Crow, and the Jackdaw. Strange, isn't it? Makes me think of the myths about Terra.
Bjorn Tyrson
Decompression Theory
Digital Vendetta
#17 - 2017-03-18 15:05:05 UTC
Gotta say it's really interesting hearing how many of yall grew up as grounders. Especially since I've never even been planetside. Please keep going
Arrendis
GoonWaffe
Goonswarm Federation
#18 - 2017-03-18 16:31:17 UTC
Kinda the other side of the rhetorical tracks from Bjorn, here. Like him, I come from a space station. Unlike him... well, my story was a little happier, a little more well-adjusted.

I come from Huggar Station, a.k.a. Pator III - Moon 2 - Republic Security Services Assembly Plant. When I was a kid, my parents were both part of station maintenance. Gunnar, my dad, was a low-level technician, one of those guys who doesn't really feel the drive to 'get ahead' so much as just takes satisfaction in doing his job, and doing it well. He even declined a promotion when I was nine, citing 'the appearance of favoritism or conflict-of-interest'. See, my mom, Jennis Culome, was the station's maintenance Chief. Not a department head, mind you, maintenance on Huggar Station is part of the Technical Staff, which is part of the Operations department. Still, had enough clout that dad didn't want his promotion to give the impression that she wasn't doing everything by the book.

At least, that's what he said. I'm pretty sure he was actually just against the idea of moving to a position with some responsibility... organizationally. I mean, let's face it, it's a space station. Maintenance is kinda responsible for everyone's continued survival.

Huggar Station's an assembly plant. Weapons and ammunition, as well as public-access production lines and re-processing facilities. So basically, most of the station's staff is part of the Ops/Technical group. Unfortunately, most of that is in the production control and management section, with a relatively small percentage in maintenance. So we were always kinda short-staffed. I say 'we', because even if I wasn't on the staff, I lived there, you know? and I had two techs for parents... let's just say that by age eight, I was crawling around fixing crap that needed fixing, even if I got in trouble for not doing my chores.

That said, it wasn't a bad life. Clan Stjörnauga is spread throughout the stations in Pator and a few nearby systems. We're all used to working among the fedo to keep things running. It wasn't until I got my plugs and moved over to Inoue, in Caldari space, that I experienced life without fedo. I don't use them on my ships now, but I certainly don't object to them.

As for food and cuisine, one of the nice things about living in the Pator system is that there's a fair amount of traffic from most of the Tribes. That means there's a decent cross-pollination of recipes and preferences. One of my favorites, and one of the few dishes I've learned to cook myself, is Tsuivan, a noodle dish with meats, cabbage, and other vegetables. I also do a pretty mean macaroni salad.
Arrendis
GoonWaffe
Goonswarm Federation
#19 - 2017-03-18 16:35:52 UTC
Bjorn Tyrson wrote:
Gotta say it's really interesting hearing how many of yall grew up as grounders. Especially since I've never even been planetside. Please keep going


You know, a lot of these folks have no idea how odd planets seem to those of us who were born and raised in space. Looking up and seeing nothing holding the air in but... more air... ugh. Fat asteroids creep me out. Only been dirtside maybe half a dozen times now, but I just cannot get used to that weirdness.
Jev North
Anshar Incorporated
Monyusaiya Industry Trade Group
#20 - 2017-03-18 16:42:54 UTC
They can grow on you, I've found, even if you didn't grow up on them. Having deep skies and weather is great.

Even though our love is cruel; even though our stars are crossed.

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