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Linux and SLI support (or similar, or other suggestions)

Author
Sev3rance
#1 - 2017-01-12 14:43:16 UTC
Hey guys:

I was wondering if any of you know if thats even possible. Was thinking on adding a similar GPU to my IGP, which some versions of windows allow to 'SLI' (I forget the new name they have for AMD for SLI), that or having a better GPU than the one I have without going for a gaming gpu.

I like discrete cards, usually are more silent than others, and dont require special power supply.

Id like to stay with AMD, though, but I would consider nvidia if there was a reasonably priced (discrete also) option.

My APU is the Trinity 7650HD (Amd A8-5600K) and Im not going after 4K, thats not yet on my horizon.

So, what do you guys recommend?

Ubuntu Mate 16.04.2 64bit // Amd A8-5600K with RX460 4GB // 6GB DDR3 // Sandisk 120GB SSD Plus // Wine Stable 2.01 // Native Linux Launcher // TS3 working // Happy to be back in Ubuntu :)

Corpse Collectors Group
#2 - 2017-01-12 18:20:08 UTC  |  Edited by: Demolishar
I recommend getting a second screen and running 1 screen off each GPU.

Crossfire support is virtually non-existent on Linux and you'd have to use the awful closed-source drivers with no Gallium-9...
Brute Force Solutions
#3 - 2017-02-21 13:33:59 UTC
Instead of a SLI, You should get something like Radeon RX480. They work fine using opensource drivers /w gallium-9 and can easily drive two screen in 1080p with two EVE fullscreen, or, if well cooled, you can run at 4k @ 60Hz+.

SLI would not get you any gain as they require proprietary driver without native d3d9 support, resulting a move of the bottleneck from the GPU, to the CPU, and because prop drivers are CPU limited (D3D9->OpenGL translation take juice), well, a SLI would have zero effect what so ever on the performance.

On the other hand, if your stuck with an Nvidia or for some reason an AMD with proprietary drivers, abusive CPU overclocking will give way better performance gain than SLI and a good CPU cooler is less expensive than a second card. If I remember properly, AMD CPU allow you to overclock just one core/module so you can pin the EVE process on that overclocked core and leave the rest at a normal frequency.
Sev3rance
#4 - 2017-03-17 05:17:54 UTC
I didnt see this the last time, thanks.

So... how complicated is to get the gallium 9 stuff u guys mention, it sounds like rocket science and moon goo to me ;)

Are there any step by step guides out there?

Ubuntu Mate 16.04.2 64bit // Amd A8-5600K with RX460 4GB // 6GB DDR3 // Sandisk 120GB SSD Plus // Wine Stable 2.01 // Native Linux Launcher // TS3 working // Happy to be back in Ubuntu :)

Goonswarm Federation
#5 - 2017-03-17 06:43:01 UTC
It's not rocket science, really. You basically need three things:

- a somewhat recent mesa built with d3d9 support
- open source drivers for your graphics card (nouveau for nVidia and ati or amdgpu for AMD)
- wine-staging built with d3d9 support

If you are on ubuntu or a derivate, you can get all of those things from PPAs, just google or look a few threads below this one, I believe I linked them a few days ago somewhere around here.

You get all these things running, open winecfg and in the staging tab, tick the checkbox for DirectX 9 support, and that's about it.

Now, I can only comment on the AMD side of things, and there the open source drivers work great with the exception of OpenCL, unfortunately. From what I have heard, the nVidia drivers may not be so great, but I have not tried them
Brute Force Solutions
#6 - 2017-03-17 14:15:17 UTC
I would like to add that you should get an AMD card and not a Nvidia card except if you are careful and look for nouveau support with card you want to buy. Most recent nvidia card dont support reclocking so are stuck at 150-300 mhz...

Also Gallium nine is the way to go with your current cpu, if you really want to use the normal wine with say, a nice recent Nvidia card, you have to change everything except if an extra 5fps compared to what you where getting with your current APU & FGLRX is enough. Your cpu is just not fast enough for the wine D3D conversion layer as it is really intensive on just one dedicated core (with csmt). Nine don't use that as its native D3D support, it dont need to be converted to opengl.

You can assume that AMD support everything, for Nvidia, you can get information here : https://nouveau.freedesktop.org/wiki/ . From what I read nouveau dont support hardware video decoding in recent hardware so if you want to play hd and 4k movie without lag, get an AMD as it support all of that and OpenCL 1.1 too.
Brute Force Solutions
#7 - 2017-03-17 14:20:30 UTC
Adara Starkiss wrote:
I didnt see this the last time, thanks.

So... how complicated is to get the gallium 9 stuff u guys mention, it sounds like rocket science and moon goo to me ;)

Are there any step by step guides out there?


you can get install instruction here : https://wiki.ixit.cz/d3d9_tutorial

you have to configure launcher to use your own wine and also on the first time you run it, put winecfg in the custom wine box instead of wine, launch "eve", go in staging tab to enable gallium-nine/directx9. Then go back in launcher setting, put wine in the custom wine box and launch again.

in eve gfx setting, be sure to leave post processing off as you gain 75% fps and put interval immediate to be sure you stay at more than 60 fps as your GPU is on the low end of the spectrum.
Sev3rance
#8 - 2017-03-24 23:14:17 UTC
Hey, thanks for the suggestions ;)

I been thinking about this a lot lately, and reading on the other thread about the RX480 I started to think that perhaps I could upgrade to the RX460, which sounds well pricewise, and I'd guess it will use the same driverset as the RX480 while being reasonably priced and still be an upgrade to my current Trinity HD 7650/7660.

What Im unsure on what will happen with my built in video on the APU. I rememder, before, whenever we had onboard graphics and you added a pci-e card, you had theoption to choose between one or the other or both, but I dont remember trying this on this mobo/apu so Im sure on what will happen.

Still, it should be a good upgrade to my current graphics. I'm normally at 60fps max, but when I run 4 clients, it goes to crawl speed at 10-15fps....

What do you think?

Ubuntu Mate 16.04.2 64bit // Amd A8-5600K with RX460 4GB // 6GB DDR3 // Sandisk 120GB SSD Plus // Wine Stable 2.01 // Native Linux Launcher // TS3 working // Happy to be back in Ubuntu :)

Brute Force Solutions
#9 - 2017-03-27 05:29:05 UTC
Adara Starkiss wrote:
Hey, thanks for the suggestions ;)

I been thinking about this a lot lately, and reading on the other thread about the RX480 I started to think that perhaps I could upgrade to the RX460, which sounds well pricewise, and I'd guess it will use the same driverset as the RX480 while being reasonably priced and still be an upgrade to my current Trinity HD 7650/7660.

What Im unsure on what will happen with my built in video on the APU. I rememder, before, whenever we had onboard graphics and you added a pci-e card, you had theoption to choose between one or the other or both, but I dont remember trying this on this mobo/apu so Im sure on what will happen.

Still, it should be a good upgrade to my current graphics. I'm normally at 60fps max, but when I run 4 clients, it goes to crawl speed at 10-15fps....

What do you think?


Yes, The RX460 use the same drivers/instruction, just slower.

As of using it, if you plug nothing in the APU and plug the screens just on the new card, it should not try to use the APU. Also in the BIOS, you can put PCIe instead of onboard in "VGA Initialization" or something like that.
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