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Player Features and Ideas Discussion

 
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3D Rendered Skyboxes for Wormhole Effects

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Test Alliance Please Ignore
#1 - 2017-01-11 02:07:21 UTC
The artwork on the skybox for pulsar, wolf-rayet, etc. systems is really beautiful, but it's a bit immersion-breaking that it doesn't move when you warp across the system. I realize that many of these effects may be hundreds or thousands of AU across, but they aren't light-years across. They are caused by massive stars, they can't be so far away that their parallax doesn't change with respect to you as you warp across system.


I was thinking it could add some realism, immersion, beauty, and a sense of awe if the effect art in these systems was rendered in 3D so that your position relative to it would change slightly as you warp across the system.




Realism trivia:

Pulsars are neutron stars--tiny collapsed stars which are about the size of a city. Due to the way magnetic field strength decays with distance, they don't actually have significant magnetic influence at stellar distances. However, they occur in the wake of a supernova, meaning that they generally are surrounded by a nebular halo of gas several lightyears across. Pulsars spin rapidly, varying from about one rotation per second to around one rotation per millisecond.

Magnetars are a special class of pulsar which have a much stronger magnetic field and a slower rotation, perhaps as slow as one revolution per ten seconds or more.

Standard black holes are collapsed stars with around 5-100 solar masses. They usually form from a core collapse of a giant star at around 20-100 solar masses, and trigger a hypernova which ejects the majority of the stellar mass. Sometimes a supernova event fails and the entire star collapses in on itself, also creating a black hole. The event horizon is around the same size as a neutron star, though the mass of the object can have gravitational influence on planetary systems over a light year away.

Cataclysmic Variable stars are giant stars with a white dwarf star in close orbit which is drawing mass away from the giant star. When the white dwarf swoops in close, the giant star brightens greatly as lots of its material is sucked away toward the white dwarf. If the white dwarf's mass reaches the Chandrasekhar limit, it will trigger a Type 1a Supernova and the white dwarf will become a neutron star. Cataclysmic Variable systems can generate chaotic nebular formations hundreds of AU across.

Red Giant stars are fairly common giant stars which are very large and cool compared to a normal star. Some of them are very massive stars which live a short life, while others are normal-mass stars that are reaching the end of their life. A red giant star's radius is many times the radius of the Sun, perhaps being as high as 10-20 AU. Many of them are surrounded by a halo of gas they have lost as they pulsate and change in brightness and size.

Wolf-Rayet stars are very massive stars nearing the end of their life, and are changing dramatically in volume over time. As they grow large, they cool rapidly until their internal pressure drops below the amount to sustain their size, causing them to collapse inward. As the star material falls inward it picks up speed and momentum, until it all collides together and raises the pressure dramatically, causing the star to get intensely bright and expand outward. This repeating cycle becomes increasingly chaotic and sends huge amounts of stellar material into space at escape velocity, until eventually the star expands too far and the collapse is so violent that it triggers a supernova.




Eta Carinae is a variable star which erupted in the 1800s and produced a cloud formation called the Homunculus nebula which today is nearly a light year across (if my calculations are correct).

FT Diomedes: "Reaver, sometimes I wonder what you are thinking when you sit down to post."

Frostys Virpio: "We have to give it to him that he does put more effort than the vast majority in his idea but damn does it sometime come out of nowhere."

Test Alliance Please Ignore
#2 - 2017-01-28 01:21:02 UTC
Bump.

I think this could be really cool and add a lot to the immersion of EVE.

FT Diomedes: "Reaver, sometimes I wonder what you are thinking when you sit down to post."

Frostys Virpio: "We have to give it to him that he does put more effort than the vast majority in his idea but damn does it sometime come out of nowhere."

Solitaire.
#3 - 2017-01-28 03:49:35 UTC
Never been in one so can't say.
C C P Alliance
#4 - 2017-01-28 03:57:31 UTC
Thanks. We're thinking about enhancements and new approaches for flying-in-space environments and I'll make sure your comments get passed on to the team.

CCP Darwin  •  Senior Software Engineer, Art & Graphics, EVE Online  •  @mark_wilkins

#5 - 2017-01-28 04:17:33 UTC
CCP Darwin wrote:
Thanks. We're thinking about enhancements and new approaches for flying-in-space environments and I'll make sure your comments get passed on to the team.




at the very least can you fix black holes? after the nebula update they became less 'hidden' behind the nebula and now you can see them in all their infected anus glory...
#6 - 2017-01-28 15:45:06 UTC
Are you sure they should move when you warp around? Maybe they are so far away that they dont have to move. I always thought they are very pretty as they are.
#7 - 2017-01-28 15:47:46 UTC
if you think the black hole is pretty you got some screwy fetishes....
Test Alliance Please Ignore
#8 - 2017-01-28 16:06:38 UTC  |  Edited by: Reaver Glitterstim
Lugh Crow-Slave wrote:
if you think the black hole is pretty you got some screwy fetishes....

I think it's ominous, which to me is a kind of pretty...

...however it seems so far away it's just not very scary. Also it looks less like a real black hole and more like a Star Trek spatial phenomena. One of the coolest and most fearsome things about black holes is what they do to everything else. I think it'd be especially cool if the black hole were rendered as a little tiny lensed object hidden deep within a swirl of clouds, with the innermost band of clouds right next to the thing swirling around so fast you could actually see it moving just slightly.

Were you at parts of the system in which you are horizontal to the cloud swirl, you won't see the black hole and the clouds will look dark--a region of space with fewer stars. But warp to the other end of the system and suddenly that dark region reveals itself to be the edge of a bright hot whirlpool spiraling away into the tiny lens of oblivion at the center.

FT Diomedes: "Reaver, sometimes I wonder what you are thinking when you sit down to post."

Frostys Virpio: "We have to give it to him that he does put more effort than the vast majority in his idea but damn does it sometime come out of nowhere."

#9 - 2017-01-28 16:08:46 UTC
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdSz12Glhlw

I am currently away, traveling through time and will be returning last week.

#10 - 2017-01-28 16:30:05 UTC  |  Edited by: Lugh Crow-Slave
Reaver Glitterstim wrote:
Lugh Crow-Slave wrote:
if you think the black hole is pretty you got some screwy fetishes....

I think it's ominous, which to me is a kind of pretty...




yeah Satan's sphincter is just gorgeous



but i could go with something along the lines of this no parallax needed considering how far away this would probably need to be
Test Alliance Please Ignore
#11 - 2017-01-28 16:38:17 UTC
Lugh Crow-Slave wrote:
but i could go with something along the lines of this no parallax needed considering how far away this would probably need to be

I don't think Anoikis is large enough to have one of those.

The kind of black holes you can expect to be scattered around Anoikis would have visible accretion disks no more than a few hundred AU across at the maximum.

FT Diomedes: "Reaver, sometimes I wonder what you are thinking when you sit down to post."

Frostys Virpio: "We have to give it to him that he does put more effort than the vast majority in his idea but damn does it sometime come out of nowhere."

#12 - 2017-01-28 16:42:41 UTC
if i can fly into the texture of a planet and see all of reality warp away around me your physics mean nothing!!


but no, in all seriousness fly so your camera bisects a planets texture just right it's freaking amazing
#13 - 2017-01-28 17:40:03 UTC  |  Edited by: Nana Skalski
http://content.eveonline.com/www/newssystem/media/66374/1/BlackHole.jpg

I was always thinking it looks organic, but more like a cosmic artery. It looks like you would be a small blood cell inside of enormous body. I understand its not your archetypal blackhole.
#14 - 2017-01-28 22:23:19 UTC
well yes rectums are organic i suppose
O.U.Z.O. Alliance
#15 - 2017-01-28 22:33:57 UTC
CCP Darwin wrote:
Thanks. We're thinking about enhancements and new approaches for flying-in-space environments and I'll make sure your comments get passed on to the team.


Reaver, I love it when you talk sexy- science.

By the way Magnetars are kinda a puzzle as far as I know but what I do know is that the neutron star crust is far from stable.

Due to the forces of magnetism and gravity the neutron star crush sometimes "crack" open. This a terrible (cool) event that is followed by an "adjustment" of the magnetic fields.
Since magentars have lots of magnetism, you should stay away from them as far as possible.

Oh wait, this "adjustment" of the neutron star crust will release a metric f-ton of energy in form of a gammy-ray burst.

A gamma-ray burst is a high-speed, high-energy release of a - let's say lazor beam - that is approximately the strength of 300 million drifter doomsday-rays that could "accidentally" erase Earth.

There is a slight possibility that one of them is pointing directly at Earth right now (don't panic).

It goes like this:

BZZZZZZZ - The End.


Oh and yes, you can see pulsar pulsating from very, very far away. Almost looks like a light-house in space (really cool stuff).

Depending on the rotation and angle of spin, they look like they have 2 beams of energy swirling away from them.

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Test Alliance Please Ignore
#16 - 2017-01-29 01:12:22 UTC
elitatwo wrote:
Oh wait, this "adjustment" of the neutron star crust will release a metric f-ton of energy in form of a gammy-ray burst.

A gamma-ray burst is a high-speed, high-energy release of a - let's say lazor beam - that is approximately the strength of 300 million drifter doomsday-rays that could "accidentally" erase Earth.

Gamma rays don't interact much with matter, mostly they pass right through it. Mostly. That lazor beam is like 300 million drifter doomsdays hitting every part of the Earth at the same time, from the surface to the core, the atmosphere, even the dust and satellites around it, the moon, maybe even other planets and the sun. It'll sterilize the planet but leave it mostly unchanged on a macro scale.

FT Diomedes: "Reaver, sometimes I wonder what you are thinking when you sit down to post."

Frostys Virpio: "We have to give it to him that he does put more effort than the vast majority in his idea but damn does it sometime come out of nowhere."

O.U.Z.O. Alliance
#17 - 2017-01-29 16:21:35 UTC
Yeah but for us it's the end.

Eve Minions is recruiting.

This is the law of ship progression!

Aura sound-clips: Aura forever

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