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EVE New Citizens Q&A

 
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New to Armor Usage

Author
78 Aster
Perkone
Caldari State
#1 - 2017-04-11 01:44:47 UTC
I have been a shield brother since Dust and am new to armoring up an amarr ship (alt). I was wondering if Eve had an equivalent to reactive plates?

Reactive plates add a very small amount of health and auto repair

in dust it was like +25 Armor HP and +1.25 HP/S

The armor reps that I can see are awful, draining more cap than they are worth. ~16 HP/S vs a Shields 200-300 HP/S

So, any equal module?

Born Caldari, Raised Minmatar

ShahFluffers
Ice Fire Warriors
#2 - 2017-04-11 02:26:21 UTC  |  Edited by: ShahFluffers
Okay... so here is an extremely short summary of "tanking" in EVE.

General:
- Active resistance modules (see: modules you have to turn on) tend to give more damage resistance than passive ones... and can be "overloaded" for a short amount of time for even higher bonuses.
- Specific resistance modules (see: EM, Thermal, Kinetic, Explosive) tend to give higher resistance bonuses vs omni-resistance modules.
- Active tanking = regenerating damage through use of high resistances and repair / booster modules you have to activate.
- Buffer tanking = packing on as much raw HP and resistances as possible.
- "Speed tanking" (see: the act of being faster than a weapon can "track" you) can be applied with all tanking styles in different ways.


Shield Tanking:
Pros:
- Regenerates with time (note: there are some ships where you can base your entire tanking style on this)
- Active tanking modules (see: shield boosters) are faster
- Has an active omni-resistance module
- Some active tanking shield modules can be loaded with a charge, making it "independent" from the ship's capacitor power for a short period of time.
- doesn't use up low-power slots (see: more room for damage enhancement modules!)
- Shield modules do not slow you down

Cons:
- Cannot get as much raw HP as an armor tank.
- Active tanking modules suck a metric fuckton of capacitor (see: it is easy to use up all your capacitor power).
- Some shield modules make you easier to hit
- Shield modules make you use up precious medium-power slots (see: less room to fit utility and electronic warfare modules)


Armor Tanking:
Pros:
- can achieve the biggest buffer tanks in the game.
- can get some of the highest damage resistances in the game.
- does not affect the "sensor footprint" of a ship (see: makes you harder to hit).
- leaves open medium power slots (see: allows you more room to fit utility and Ewar modules).
- Probably the most common tanking style in the game.
- More "efficient" in terms of capacitor power in terms of HP/sec (I don't know how you are getting such low numbers for armor and high numbers for shield).

Cons:
- Armor plates make you slow
- Armor mods use low-power slots (see: less slots for damage enhancement modules)
- Active armor tanks are slower to "absorb" damage.



And no... to my knowledge there is no passive module that regenerates armor.
mkint
#3 - 2017-04-11 02:33:02 UTC
Firstly, nobody cares about dust. And no, there is no passive armor regen, no matter what modules you fit.

Whatever modules you are looking at in comparing armor and shield, you either aren't comparing equivalent modules, or you don't know what cap is.

So before proceeding, forget what you think you know because you've got some misconceptions.

1) armor tanks can maintain a strong sustained tank and/or a solid buffer.

2) shield tanks will tend to have a much higher burst tank but significantly worse sustained tank, and will either have a much smaller buffer or have to sacrifice a lot more to get a good buffer.

As with most things, things tend to balance out.

So since the only question you really asked, you asked twice, here's your answer twice: No. There is no passive armor regen.

Maxim 6. If violence wasn’t your last resort, you failed to resort to enough of it.

Chainsaw Plankton
FaDoyToy
#4 - 2017-04-11 18:32:06 UTC
a large armor rep uses 400 cap and reps 920 armor, 2.3 hp/cap. A xl shield booster costs 360cap for 690 shield 1.9 hp/cap.

now armor cycles take longer, and the rep happens at the end of a cycle. where shield is faster and happens at the start of the cycle. also shield can be improved by a shield boost amp

If you get into deadspace mods the ratios can get pretty crazy

@ChainsawPlankto on twitter

Honrado deQuiros
Cartella Shipments and Storage
#5 - 2017-04-12 08:54:16 UTC
The reactive armor hardener can give you 60% in one resist type, or 2x 30% ones. It goes in the low slot and it starts with an even 15% all resists when activated. As you get hit by different guns, it will adapt to that type of damage per module cycle.

Missioning (pve), you need to match your resists to the type of enemy with values of 70~80% being good. You have to pulse your armor reps and not have it activated all the time because that will drain your cap. Cap stability at 3~4 minutes is good enough, whereas I always hear Caldari pilots says 'lol not cap stable'. Again, pve is about resists not buffer hp.

Flying a T3 Cruiser with resists around 90%, you will see single digit damage notifications, with the occasional 20~15 damage from battleships which is easily repped by the medium armor repairer.
Alasdan Helminthauge
The Scope
Gallente Federation
#6 - 2017-04-12 09:21:29 UTC
Honrado deQuiros wrote:
The reactive armor hardener can give you 60% in one resist type, or 2x 30% ones. It goes in the low slot and it starts with an even 15% all resists when activated. As you get hit by different guns, it will adapt to that type of damage per module cycle.

Missioning (pve), you need to match your resists to the type of enemy with values of 70~80% being good. You have to pulse your armor reps and not have it activated all the time because that will drain your cap. Cap stability at 3~4 minutes is good enough, whereas I always hear Caldari pilots says 'lol not cap stable'. Again, pve is about resists not buffer hp.

Flying a T3 Cruiser with resists around 90%, you will see single digit damage notifications, with the occasional 20~15 damage from battleships which is easily repped by the medium armor repairer.


I think it' pretty easy to get a stable pve active armor fit. At least all my pve armor fits are stable.
ergherhdfgh
Imperial Academy
Amarr Empire
#7 - 2017-04-12 10:11:53 UTC
One other difference worth pointing out is that when people are trying to fit for maximum tank on local rep ships, shield ships typically go up a size where are armor ships will typically fit 2 reppers.

i.e. in a battleship if you were shield you'd go up from one large shield booster to one XL shield booster where as if you where armor you'd just fit 2 large armor reppers.

I'm not going to get into the fitting reasons for this since it becomes obvious if you play around with the fits for a bit. So I'll just point out this difference for now.

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Chainsaw Plankton
FaDoyToy
#8 - 2017-04-12 17:37:02 UTC
Alasdan Helminthauge wrote:
Honrado deQuiros wrote:
The reactive armor hardener can give you 60% in one resist type, or 2x 30% ones. It goes in the low slot and it starts with an even 15% all resists when activated. As you get hit by different guns, it will adapt to that type of damage per module cycle.

Missioning (pve), you need to match your resists to the type of enemy with values of 70~80% being good. You have to pulse your armor reps and not have it activated all the time because that will drain your cap. Cap stability at 3~4 minutes is good enough, whereas I always hear Caldari pilots says 'lol not cap stable'. Again, pve is about resists not buffer hp.

Flying a T3 Cruiser with resists around 90%, you will see single digit damage notifications, with the occasional 20~15 damage from battleships which is easily repped by the medium armor repairer.


I think it' pretty easy to get a stable pve active armor fit. At least all my pve armor fits are stable.

my armor fits are typically more stable than my shield fits.

fitting resists to match the npcs gives you a huge easy to get boost to help learn the missions, but once you get used to them and can put out some good dps I prefer an omni tank so I don't need to worry about changing my resists each mission.

t3 cruisers also benefit from having a small sig and typically high speed (at least for mission standards) which further reduces incoming damage, t2 cruisers are also pretty good at this. and navy vexors with 100mn abs are a pretty common nullsec ratting fit.

@ChainsawPlankto on twitter