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Linux Laptop Overheating when run EVE

Author
Squigglily
The Scope
Gallente Federation
#1 - 2017-01-04 23:59:25 UTC
I have a dual-boot Windows 10/Linux Mint machine, and I installed EVE on the Linux half of the machine using CCP Snorlax's EVE Launcher. Whenever I try to run EVE, however, even with all of the graphics settings as low as possible, my machine gets very hot and eventually shuts down. I know the machine is capable of running EVE because it runs just fine on the Windows partition with the graphics settings almost all the way up. My machine has an i7-4810MQ processor and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 860M GPU. Some old posts suggested closing the Launcher after the game is started, but I tried that with no effect. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
Neuntausend
Rens Nursing Home
#2 - 2017-01-05 16:43:24 UTC
Generally, if a machine overheats there's something wrong with the cooling. Under Windows, Eve might put a little less strain on your components so the issue doesn't occur, but I think the underlying problem is with your cooling, not with the software.

In any case, what exactly does overheat - CPU or GPU? And how hot does it get?
Squigglily
The Scope
Gallente Federation
#3 - 2017-01-06 04:16:02 UTC  |  Edited by: Squigglily
Thanks for responding and sorry it took me a little while to get a chance to check! It looks like the CPU is the primary offender. I logged into EVE and sat in station for about five minutes, and the CPU cores reached maximum temperatures between 85 and 87 C, while the GPU only reached 70 C. Max CPU usage during that time was 34%, and everything dropped down to the mid 50s or below within a minute or so of me alt-tabbing out of EVE to send this message.

EDIT: Ran it for a little longer after starting TLP to see if that would help. CPU hit 94 C, GPU hit 77 C. Everything still cooled down almost immediately after exiting EVE.

Neuntausend wrote:
Generally, if a machine overheats there's something wrong with the cooling. Under Windows, Eve might put a little less strain on your components so the issue doesn't occur, but I think the underlying problem is with your cooling, not with the software.

In any case, what exactly does overheat - CPU or GPU? And how hot does it get?
Neuntausend
Rens Nursing Home
#4 - 2017-01-06 19:02:58 UTC  |  Edited by: Neuntausend
As I said - probably a cooling issue. I would suggest getting some canned air and cleaning out the dust. If you can reach the actual heat sinks without voiding the warranty, or if the warranty has run out, I recommend doing so, as just blowing air into the intake/exhaust vents usually doesn't help much.

Another possibility is, that your Linux setup messes with the fan curves in some way, preventing them from going full throttle when the CPU gets too hot. Can you check how fast they are going under Linux and Windows under load? I could also imagine that the CPU power/thermal management doesn't work properly with your installation of Linux, so that where in Windows the CPU would just underclock/undervolt automatically, under Linux it just keeps going at full speed and ends up overheating.
Torgeir Hekard
I MYSELF AND ME
#5 - 2017-01-09 09:54:36 UTC
I kinda have experience with similar issues. Not with eve though.

I had problems with some more demanding games that would slow down to a crawl after about 10 minutes of play (DOS:EE for example).

After some tinkering around I narrowed it down to CPU overheating.

The thing is, at least in my case both CPU and GPU chips share the cooler and sit on the same heat pipe (IIRC CPU sits in the middle between the heat sink and the GPU). The problem is they have different ideas about what constitutes a high temperature (My NV 645M considers high to be 95C+ apparently). So GPU working full time cooks my CPU in a couple of minutes, at which point CPU goes full throttle. Meanwhile GPU drives believe it's all good and fine. So I have to manually enforce GPU pstates (I use nouveau now, but it's sorta kinda manageable with proprietary drivers, but the UI is horrible the last time I checked) to keep the heat down. Unfortunately you can't set things like target temperature, so I had to settle for GPU just working at lower pstate all the time.

Probably there's better communication between GPU and CPU regarding the issue under windows.

If only nvidia drivers had a way to set temperature targets...
Katrina Bekers
Pandemic Horde Inc.
Pandemic Horde
#6 - 2017-01-10 11:13:45 UTC
If you didn't yet fiddled with the interval setting (which is basically sort of a vsync), try and set it to ONE.

In interval immediate, the CPU/GPU combo try and push as many frames as they can, leading often to overheating.

In interval one, they cap the frames at the video refresh time, and thus "save" on frames - and then in power/heat.

Try and let us know.

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