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Appears that the EM drive really does work

Author
Commissar Kate
NulzSec
#1 - 2016-11-19 13:26:19 UTC
Yiole Gionglao
#2 - 2016-11-19 15:44:21 UTC


Well, just shoot the thing into space, fire it at 10kW and let's see whether it moves. Currently it's just a toy with a power rating of 80 watts, so first thing should be to make it bigger and see whether the supposed impulse scalates.

Roses are red / Violets are blue / I am an alpha / And so it's you

stoicfaux
#3 - 2016-11-19 15:47:53 UTC
Great. Just great. Now anyone with rockets can bombard the Earth with relativistic kinetic weapons. Launch them on rockets, let them "fly" out, turn around, and build up the speed to become kinetic energy super-nukes. Granted, the time scale is a bit long, but nihilists are patient people.


Obligatory atomic-rockets/project rho link: http://www.projectrho.com/public_html/rocket/spacegunexotic.php#rbomb


Pon Farr Memorial: once every 7 years, all the carebears in high-sec must PvP or they will be temp-banned.

Nana Skalski
Taisaanat Kotei
#4 - 2016-11-19 16:12:50 UTC
Commissar Kate
NulzSec
#5 - 2016-11-20 02:47:33 UTC
Yiole Gionglao wrote:


Well, just shoot the thing into space, fire it at 10kW and let's see whether it moves. Currently it's just a toy with a power rating of 80 watts, so first thing should be to make it bigger and see whether the supposed impulse scalates.


There already are plans to launch one into space. It's really nice to see a commercial space company pick this up for commercial use as the tech will develop rapidly and hopefully take us to Mars and beyond sooner rather than later.
Yiole Gionglao
#6 - 2016-11-20 13:31:00 UTC
Commissar Kate wrote:
Yiole Gionglao wrote:


Well, just shoot the thing into space, fire it at 10kW and let's see whether it moves. Currently it's just a toy with a power rating of 80 watts, so first thing should be to make it bigger and see whether the supposed impulse scalates.


There already are plans to launch one into space. It's really nice to see a commercial space company pick this up for commercial use as the tech will develop rapidly and hopefully take us to Mars and beyond sooner rather than later.


A Cubesat? Come on, there's like 1,000 possible effects that can overpower the alleged thrust. The paper claims a thrust of 1.2 milinewtons per kilowat, on a device powered by 0.08 kilowats, that's a whopping 96 micronewtons of alleged thrust.

So don't bother with launching yet another tiny toy engine into space, build an effin 10 kilowat prototype and measure whether it produces thrust on Earth. Then, either the alleged thrust will escalate and farewell Newton's 3rd, or it won't produce any measurable thrust and welcome to qwack science.

In order to be of use, the effect must be real and must escalate. It is highly suspicious that they keep it in toy power ratings and want to launch it to space rather than just make it bigger. That's a propaganda stunt, not sensible engineering.

Roses are red / Violets are blue / I am an alpha / And so it's you

Nana Skalski
Taisaanat Kotei
#7 - 2016-11-20 16:01:58 UTC  |  Edited by: Nana Skalski
Quote:
The trajectory of any one particle depends on what all the other particles described by the same wave function are doing. And, critically, the wave function has no geographic limits; it might, in principle, span the entire universe. Which means that the universe is weirdly interdependent, even across vast stretches of space. The wave function “combines — or binds — distant particles into a single irreducible reality,” as Sheldon Goldstein, a mathematician and physicist at Rutgers University, has written.

https://www.quantamagazine.org/20160517-pilot-wave-theory-gains-experimental-support/

While it may be this way, its deterministic system and completely surpasses science ability to predict things on such grand scale.

May be scary for some people.
Hesod Adee
Perkone
Caldari State
#8 - 2016-11-20 17:58:56 UTC
Yiole Gionglao wrote:
Commissar Kate wrote:
Yiole Gionglao wrote:


Well, just shoot the thing into space, fire it at 10kW and let's see whether it moves. Currently it's just a toy with a power rating of 80 watts, so first thing should be to make it bigger and see whether the supposed impulse scalates.


There already are plans to launch one into space. It's really nice to see a commercial space company pick this up for commercial use as the tech will develop rapidly and hopefully take us to Mars and beyond sooner rather than later.


A Cubesat? Come on, there's like 1,000 possible effects that can overpower the alleged thrust. The paper claims a thrust of 1.2 milinewtons per kilowat, on a device powered by 0.08 kilowats, that's a whopping 96 micronewtons of alleged thrust.

So don't bother with launching yet another tiny toy engine into space, build an effin 10 kilowat prototype and measure whether it produces thrust on Earth. Then, either the alleged thrust will escalate and farewell Newton's 3rd, or it won't produce any measurable thrust and welcome to qwack science.

In order to be of use, the effect must be real and must escalate. It is highly suspicious that they keep it in toy power ratings and want to launch it to space rather than just make it bigger. That's a propaganda stunt, not sensible engineering.


NASA knows how to launch it into space. Run the drive for long enough and they will be able to see the course of the satellite change far enough to prove that the EM drive is providing thrust.

Scaling the EM drive up to useful power levels probably requires an understanding of how the EM drive works that they do not have.
Nana Skalski
Taisaanat Kotei
#9 - 2016-12-02 07:33:48 UTC
Lasisha Mishi
A Blessed Bean
Pandemic Horde
#10 - 2016-12-02 17:14:46 UTC

the theory works yes...
but its EXTREMELY far from beign usable as its incredibly inefficient right now
1.2 millinewtons per kilowatt

for that kidn of power, your better off shooting electricity into space. or lightbulbs and using the light and heat produced to push you
seriously....you'd get more thrust using LIGHTBULBS than with this.


or heck, using gravity.


the theory has been proven that somethign is happening. but its not understood HOW. theres a number of unknowns in it so for all we know the thrust its providing is actually electricity escaping(which actually matches the thrust being produced)

and newton's 3rd law isn't disproven, there is a counterpush involved. but again its so microscopically small its hard to detect.


all this news is is "hey we found an alternate way to produce thrust, but its inefficient right now and not understood"



Nana Skalski
Taisaanat Kotei
#11 - 2016-12-02 19:35:34 UTC
Most efficient are antigravity drive and alcubiere drive. But both are still in a phase of theorycrafting.

This EM drive looks more like a science defying quirk, that could push our knowledge further, or make us even more confused about the world we are living in. Both scenarios look plausible to me.