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Q: Where do I find the inclination of orbits within a solar system?

First post
Author
Sephira Galamore
Inner Beard Society
#1 - 2014-11-26 23:02:59 UTC  |  Edited by: Sephira Galamore
Is there some way to get the inclinations of planet (& moon) orbits?
I can't find them anywhere in the Static Data Export and I would need them to draw orbital lines in 3D space...

How does the the client plot orbits? I assume the data exists, but it's just not included in the SDE?

Dev reply appreciated, but any help is welcome.. maybe I just missed something!

For those wondering..
http://i.imgur.com/kIm3BM1.png should illustrate why just sun and planet positions are not sufficient to determine an orbit.
Steve Ronuken
Fuzzwork Enterprises
Vote Steve Ronuken for CSM
#2 - 2014-11-26 23:57:01 UTC
As far as I'm aware, that information isn't in the SDE Sad

Woo! CSM XI!

Fuzzwork Enterprises

Twitter: @fuzzysteve on Twitter

Sephira Galamore
Inner Beard Society
#3 - 2014-11-27 09:07:01 UTC
I wonder what the chances are to get it included...
Lors Dornick
Kallisti Industries
#4 - 2014-11-27 11:21:24 UTC
Given that orbitals in EvE (planets, moons, stations and so on) doesn't actually orbit, they stay in one position all the time, it might be that the data quite frankly isn't there, nor needed.

It seems (I haven't checked) that the orbits shown in the client is based on the assumption that each orbital is 'frozen' at it's apogee.

CCP Greyscale: As to starbases, we agree it's pretty terrible, but we don't want to delay the entire release just for this one factor.

Kali Izia
GoomWaffe
#5 - 2014-11-27 12:27:44 UTC
The last time this came up I did some digging and it appeared that the client calculated it based on the itemID of the celestial, but the numbers didn't make a lot of sense by just comparing them to what I could see visually and I didn't have any way to render them so I had no way of verifying the math was correct.
I'll see if I can dig up my test queries in case someone else can make sense of it.
Sephira Galamore
Inner Beard Society
#6 - 2014-11-27 14:26:30 UTC  |  Edited by: Sephira Galamore
Lors Dornick wrote:
Given that orbitals in EvE (planets, moons, stations and so on) doesn't actually orbit, they stay in one position all the time, it might be that the data quite frankly isn't there, nor needed.

It seems (I haven't checked) that the orbits shown in the client is based on the assumption that each orbital is 'frozen' at it's apogee.

Ya, I know that it doesn't have any game mechanic relevance, but if you want to draw a system in 3d it's nice to have visible orbit lines - which is precisely why we have them in the client :)

I don't see tho what the assumption about the celestial beeing frozen at its apogee has to do with its orbit inclination tho. No matter the eccentricity (which IS in included in the export btw), there are still infinite possible orbits.

You either need the orbit inclination based on a defined plane, or the coordinates of a second orbit location to determine the exact 3d orbit.


I should add..
Parts of this are new territory for me, and my brain already hurts from wraping some of those around.. so if I'm missing some detail, please correct me thoroughly! :)
Dragonaire
Here there be Dragons
#7 - 2014-11-27 23:29:13 UTC
Assuming they are at apogee, and you know their eccentricity, their coords and that of what they are orbiting you can figure out the orbits.

Finds camping stations from the inside much easier. Designer of Yapeal for the Eve API. Check out the Yapeal PHP API Library thread.

Sephira Galamore
Inner Beard Society
#8 - 2014-11-27 23:35:53 UTC
Dragonaire wrote:
Assuming they are at apogee, and you know their eccentricity, their coords and that of what they are orbiting you can figure out the orbits.

How? If I rotate around the axis going through apogee, star and perigree, I can see infinite orbits with the same eccentricity..
Sephira Galamore
Inner Beard Society
#9 - 2014-11-28 00:08:50 UTC  |  Edited by: Sephira Galamore
So you made me do this :p
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Rje93BH-H8
I should add w.r.t. the thread title: What changes as I rotate the egg, or as I look at a different band is the inclination.

(Please bear my inexperience at unscripted recordings)


Edit:
As I looked a bit more at that little egg..
I guess if I assume that the orbit always crosses the reference plane (which I further assume is spanned by u=(1|0|0) and v=(0|0|1)) at the points of the two 'solstices'.. hmm..

Nope, the apogee assumption is falling flat.. http://i.imgur.com/ZrsigmJ.png
Sephira Galamore
Inner Beard Society
#10 - 2014-12-10 09:08:03 UTC
Fun fact, the official Beta Star Map doesn't know the true orbits either <.<