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EVE New Citizens Q&A

 
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Greetings

Author
Starden Arnolles
Wormlife Freeport Operations
Wormlife
#1 - 2012-12-14 02:29:46 UTC
Started trial yesterday, activated 90 day recurring today. Started with HALO online 2004, WoW (Hardcore Progression Raider) early 2005 to perhaps soon end, EVE Online started yesterday.

I was getting very tired of the developers playing musical chairs and changing everything constantly in WoW, so I posted I was looking for a "desk top PC game, similar to wow, but with more choices, better balance, where there is some stability, where you do not have to learn how to replay your class periodically, and where the players themselves get to choose what they think is fun, without artificial limits on their doing it." EVE Online was suggested by a contact.

I have been madly reading and learning as I go with my time off (Work is demanding in real life to say the least), and I am impressed from what I have seen so far, that this is probably my new game. I think I have outgrown WoW, as great as it has been. This game seems to be spot on what I described that I was looking for. It is likely my new OCD vice.

I have quite a bit to learn, but now no artificial limits. I expect to be here for quite some time, and in time, make my mark here as I did in WoW. This game may take more time though to accomplish that. I am the greenist newbie here right now, and you guys are the pros. I want to learn from you.

I am older, mature, control my time and life, take fun gaming seriously (if you are a gamer you understand), and I am going to need a corporation where not only will I benefit from it, but in time it will benefit from me. I earn my place. Always have, always will.

I am a little shy, not cocky, but quietly confident, love games and always have, and hope to share my coming adventures with like minded others.

So I am looking to learn and grow, and in time excel. And perhaps find a home before long.

I need advice and tips and words of wisdom from the mentors here, and I humbly look to you as I begin my new journey.
Krullon
Windrammers
Requiem Eternal
#2 - 2012-12-14 02:54:44 UTC
Let me be the first to welcome you to a new game and a new world :P

Truth be told your story is a familiar one, I myself came from WoW. It started to get old and while it broke new ground in the MMO industry it certainly wont hold many as more compelling games evolve.

My advice is simple: When something "bad" happens in the game, recognize the steps that got you there and the feeling of loss or disappointment. I have yet to find a game that drives your emotions or adrenaline like eve online.

As far as Corps go, I would suggest Eve-university. I have heard great things about them and I think they do a great job of exposing you to most if not all of the aspects of eve online. I think you would do yourself a disservice if you didn't take a few months to explore what you really enjoy doing in eve.

The good news is, you can play this game for years and still be learning new things. Not to mention have a TONNE of things to look forward to every time you log on. The first year is the "toughest", with expectations and hoping to be at specific "level" to fly certain cool ships. I think the recent expansion has been successful making it the most new player friendly version it has ever been. I certainly struggled when I started.

Keep in touch let us know how it goes for you :)

Feel free to contact me in game.
Choi Baedal
Native Freshfood
Minmatar Republic
#3 - 2012-12-14 03:04:25 UTC
No one told me this but if your planning on doing missions, check out the skills Social and Connections. They don't take long to level and help out in the long run.
Karas Otoha
Apotheosis of Caledvwich
Ex Cineres bonum Faustum
#4 - 2012-12-14 03:24:08 UTC
Welcome to eve. If you ever have question just ask in the forums or if you want you can drop me a line played many aspects of the game so can probably answer what you your curious about. So you welcome to pm or mail me.
ShahFluffers
Ice Fire Warriors
#5 - 2012-12-14 07:12:58 UTC  |  Edited by: ShahFluffers
Starden Arnolles wrote:
I was getting very tired of the developers playing musical chairs and changing everything constantly in WoW, so I posted I was looking for a "desk top PC game, similar to wow, but with more choices, better balance, where there is some stability, where you do not have to learn how to replay your class periodically, and where the players themselves get to choose what they think is fun, without artificial limits on their doing it." EVE Online was suggested by a contact.

After reading this, I feel I should point a few things out.

People often associate "balanced" with "fair"... and this is simply not the case in EVE. EVE isn't fair... but it tries to be "balanced" albeit in a more roundabout way.

For example: People who wish you ill can and will use anything they have at their disposal to get an edge over you. This can include, but is not limited to;
- getting an alt character in the corp you are in to gain intel and generally screw you over.
- outnumbering you.
- using various ships/tactics to directly counter yours (which is gathered through intel and recon).

How does this create "balance?" Well... the part about EVE (and the part I love) is that you can also use those same tactics against your enemies to do them harm.

Basically EVE is a perpetual "rat race" where everyone is trying to get an edge over everyone else using the same "tools" as everyone else.


As far as "classes" go... the closest thing that this game has to compare to such a concept are "specialties." Certain ships, races, and tech levels are better at certain "specialties" than others... but all ships can be modified to a certain degree to do things outside of their specialty.

Tech 1 ships, as they stand right now, provide limited specialization with a degree of "general effectiveness."
Tech 2 ships provide a high specialization towards certain fits and tactics at the cost of "general effectiveness."
Tech 3 is... well... slightly broken in certain ways and is due for a rebalance. The intention is that they can gain the multiple specialties of Tech 2 ships but to a lesser degree.

Then you have the ship classes themselves which decide which tactics to use.
Example: a Frigate has poor defense but high innate speed and target locking time. This is contrasted by battleships which have very high defensive abilities and firepower, but limited mobility and locking time.
This makes frigates well suited for "interception" and "scouting" duties, avoiding direct confrontations if possible, while battleships shine in "in your face" brawls.

Beyond this... there is no limit to the amount of skill points you can gain over your character's lifetime. So you can use a frigate to perform in scouting duties one day... and then hop into a battleship if the need arises... provided you have the proper skills to do so of course.

Starden Arnolles wrote:
I have been madly reading and learning as I go with my time off (Work is demanding in real life to say the least), and I am impressed from what I have seen so far, that this is probably my new game. I think I have outgrown WoW, as great as it has been. This game seems to be spot on what I described that I was looking for. It is likely my new OCD vice.

Don't be too OCD. You WILL make mistakes as you progress through the game... and this is intentional.

That is partially why the skill system is what it is. It effectively "forces" you to slow down and experiment with things... see if you can't find a way around a particular problem you are having (that may or may not include other players' help)... as well as keep you in "cheaper" ships and equipment so that any losses you do incur early on will not leave you utterly destitute.

Also remember that there is no such thing as "wasted" skillpoints. A ship or specialty that you abandon today may prove to be useful sometime in the future.
Likewise... there may be a ship or specialty that you desire, but you may need to skill for something unrelated "right now" to further your goal(s).



My general advice, which will be the same advice you receive from many others, is to find a "good" corporation and learn from the people within it.

My PERSONAL advice is to look for a PvP corp run by veteran players. True PvPers can teach you the "tricks of the trade" which you can then use to safeguard your own assets and avoid other PvPers. They can also teach you ways to gain income as PvP is an expensive habit and they too need to find ways to fund themselves.

When looking at corps... disregard any "Skill Point limitations" you see and just contact them directly. Often, the "SP limits" are there to scare away the "general rabble"... and if you show yourself to be someone whose company they may enjoy, you'll be in.
Starden Arnolles
Wormlife Freeport Operations
Wormlife
#6 - 2012-12-14 16:15:39 UTC
ShahFluffers – I greatly appreciate your comments, and the others.

Without boring everyone as to exactly why, it seems after about a day and a half, this is the sandbox I am looking for in respect to where I am now in gaming.

It seems there is more eventually to learn here, but that it all continuously contributes to your character, and rather than changing how he or she plays, that learning continually increases his or her knowledge, ability and skill, all in a directed manner, pretty much chosen by the player.

Here, rather than the developers dictating what you do and how many times you do it and when and where you do it, you seem to be able to make all those decisions yourself.

It does seem totally ruthless and cutthroat in many respects, and that the elements of risk/reward are much greater, but as you pointed out, each can prepare and guard and choose and do as they wish (within minimal restrictions), limited far more by themselves, than by their restrictive shell of ever-changing class abilities.

I have been here less than 48 hours, but so far it has been very engaging. There is a big learning curve in this game I can see already. I am going slow right now, accumulating resources slowly and carefully, as I do understand I would be easy pickings for others outside the high security areas. So I am staying in those as I continue. In time I expect that will change, but I have a great deal to learn first. I expect to be a victim in time, and probably soon, but I am learning not to put all my eggs into one basket, learning about insurance and the value of a quality clone, etc. Basically, I am preparing for the inevitable setbacks, and to survive them well. I can easily see the more I know the better I can play.

I have read about Eve University and was thinking of it as the best place to start. I have not yet seen how or where to apply though. I am sure I will find it. I am not sure I am ready just to jump into a corporation though, as I want to attain some minimum level of competence first, but my real life should finally be relaxed for a few weeks during the holiday season, and it is a great time for me to get a good start.
Doddy
Excidium.
#7 - 2012-12-14 16:29:41 UTC
Neither staying in hi sec nor joining eve uni are particularly good ideas. Eve uni has some great classes on mechanics etc (many avaiable to non students) to be fair, but their over all mind set towards new players is a very negative one. Don't do this, you can't do this, do this you will die etc. Also staying in hi sec for any length of time will probably just lead to you catching the fear.

Anyway you haven't said what you want to do in game, and there is no point joining a corp till you know that.
Mindrago Aldent
Doomheim
#8 - 2012-12-14 16:31:19 UTC
Welcome aboard mate...just remember, whatever else you do in EvE...have fun Big smile
Aptenodytes
Reckless Abandon
#9 - 2012-12-14 16:34:19 UTC
Welcome, you have a great attitude, the kind that makes a successful EVE player.

Starden Arnolles wrote:
I do understand I would be easy pickings for others outside the high security areas.

Yes, but don't let that put you off too much. The golden rule in EVE is do not fly what you can't afford to lose. So as soon as you can afford to lose it, go for it! When you can afford to throw away a frigate, fittings and buy a new clone without it affecting your assets (say when you hit the 10 mil ISK mark), do so, and take it to low sec. You might not meet anyone, and just fly around for an hour checking out what it's like. Or you might get killed as soon as you jump in. If you survive long enough then you can even go to 0.0, which is almost certain death. Whatever happens I guarantee the blood will be pumping harder than any other game you've ever played. You'll probably panic and do incredibly stupid things like forget to fire your guns or turn on your shield booster... everyone does their first time. But you learn and don't make the same mistake more than about 6 or 7 times :)
voetius
Grundrisse
#10 - 2012-12-14 16:38:11 UTC

Best advice I can give in addition to the above is:

- don't make enemies needlessly, you don't need to make any at all really. Even in null sec politics, sometimes todays "enemy" is tomorrows ally

- that includes all the forum drama about goons vs anti-goons, high vs null sec, etc etc. Don't take sides.

- there's always new stuff to learn. Even after nearly 5 years I still find out new stuff or the game changes and I have to learn new stuff

- be patient, sometimes it's hard watching those skills tick along while you want it to finish to open up some new module or ship. It took me several years before I stopped worrying about skills

Good luck
Starden Arnolles
Wormlife Freeport Operations
Wormlife
#11 - 2012-12-14 16:48:57 UTC
I am at the office, but reading these comments here, and in a couple other threads has me thinking about leaving early.

Let me make something clear, players like you guys posting on these forums are more helpful and positive for a new player than you can probably imagine.

OK, some specific questions:

How many SPs (and I know this is not possible to answer exactly), just very generally, do I need to get to step up to the next level - by that I mean like go soloing into low security areas, to be attractive to a mutually good fit corporation, to really feel like I have at least a handle on the overall game?

Assuming good reading and research skills, and something of a controlled OCD personality, how many actual time played hours (very generally) will it take me to get there?


What is the best way to learn about all the game potentially offers me, and how to realize that, as quickly and as efficiently as possible, so that I can best choose and plan?
Max Godsnottlingson
Viziam
Amarr Empire
#12 - 2012-12-14 16:53:53 UTC
I have played Eve since day one of it going retail, now while I have never played WoW, I do have LotRO on my HD and will be heading off to Middle Earth for a couple of hours later on, so I do know where you are coming from.

Coming to Eve can be quite a culture shock simply because it is such a different experience, so can I offer you a few words to help you settle into the game

1. You will hear of us talking about Armour or Shield tanking, and even the odd crazy who talks about Hull tanking, but the MOST importent thing you need to tank is your skin. You need a thick skin to play Eve. At best we do tend to have a caustic gallows type humour, at worst, Eve players can teach the art of trolling to the rest of the world.

2. A lot of folks who step over from the WoW type games to Eve are often at a lose what to do once they have finished their tutorials and the Sisters of Eve Epic Mission line, think of them as being an advanced tutorial quest line.
Eve does not have that same railroad progression system, it's a sandbox and it's upto the player to decide what they want to do. For somebody coming from a more structured game that can actually be a shock to thier systems. So keep your planning tight, don't focus too far ahead and don't get disallusioned at all the uber kit that seems too far in the distance

3.Another concern of WoW type gamers is summed up in the following sentance
"How can I go up against all of these veteran players, I'll never catch them up."
No, you will never catch me up on experience points, not unless I leave Eve for six years, and you keep on playing. But Eve is actually a great leveler. Games like WoW you easily get "Owned" by a character just one or two levels then you. In Eve, it is more then easy for Max here to end up getting 'Owned' and having his botty handed to him by a small gang of noobies in small fast frigates. We can only ever fly a single ship at a time, you catch me in the wrong ship, with you in the right ship, and I am toast

4. Plan what you want to do, keep your planning tight, stay with specialising as one ship type of pilot and you will soon be flying alongside and against veteran pilots. And remember, being vet doesn't stop you from being stupid, as I was last night when I popped into a Worm Hole system without checking how much life was left in the Worm Hole.

5. Make sure that you always enjoy Eve. It is a deep, complex, and emotive game. If you are not careful it can all to easy start to feel like a second job, ask any medium sized or larger Corp CEO or director. Do what you want to do, don't listen to others.

6. Make sure that your ship set up is Badder and better then the other guys! (Bigger is not always the case in Eve)

7. This is worth repeating. Keep having fun.

And finally, welcome to the big, bad but beutiful world of Eve. If you love it, you'll be here a long, long time
Gizznitt Malikite
Agony Unleashed
Agony Empire
#13 - 2012-12-14 16:56:43 UTC

The corp you fly with will have a MAJOR influence on your enjoyment of this game...

Find activities to suite your personality:
If you are a social gamer, look for a good group to fly with...
If you want adrenaline rushes, look for PvP (some adv PvE can give you that rush, but most wont).
If you want to create or be "self-sufficient".... look at Manufacturing and Invention...
If you want to chill and relax, look at mining, hauling/trading, or mission running...

There are many "areas" of EvE, and even after many years you will still be a newb in many of them!

Aptenodytes
Reckless Abandon
#14 - 2012-12-14 17:02:16 UTC
Starden Arnolles wrote:
How many SPs (and I know this is not possible to answer exactly), just very generally, do I need to get to step up to the next level - by that I mean like go soloing into low security areas, to be attractive to a mutually good fit corporation, to really feel like I have at least a handle on the overall game?

Watch this (if you haven't already): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSxSyv4LC1c
This guy is flying an interceptor but it could quite easily be an Atron, a ship that you can already fly. The role he played is a role you could already play, with the skill points you already have. In fact many players have PVP alts with not much more than the starting skills.

My point is that skill points give you an edge but they are not the be all and end all. A good attitude, willingness to learn and enthusiasm are much more important.

I would say, stay in the rookie corp for now, while you learn the ropes. You can ask them for advice (but take it with a pinch of salt!!), or join Help channel. Once you know what you want to do, you can find a corp that does that.
Randolph Rothstein
whatever corp.
#15 - 2012-12-14 17:58:51 UTC
contrary to popular belief i think eve is not really that much "intelectually demanding" - lots of things to learn sure,but its not very complicated so even if you feel overwhelmed right now,after some time you will pro like a pro Cool

the only thing that will hold you back are skill points,lot of stuff i want to do but not enough SP to do it - or do it efficiently

more than anything else eve will test your patience so have fun while you wait
Xercodo
Cruor Angelicus
#16 - 2012-12-14 19:12:51 UTC
I'd like to point out that all SP is non-specific, it could mean anything.

You can have 50 million SP in science for all we know. You may not be worth a damn in combat at all.

But personally a well balanced skill plan can get you pretty good at frigate combat with 5 mill SP.

Most of that coming from skills like small weapon skill level 5 and racial frigate skill at 5 and a bunch of various level 4 core skills for speed, capacitor management, and tanking.

The Drake is a Lie

NightCrawler 85
Phoibe Enterprises
#17 - 2012-12-15 01:29:44 UTC
Starden Arnolles wrote:
I
How many SPs (and I know this is not possible to answer exactly), just very generally, do I need to get to step up to the next level - by that I mean like go soloing into low security areas, to be attractive to a mutually good fit corporation, to really feel like I have at least a handle on the overall game?

Assuming good reading and research skills, and something of a controlled OCD personality, how many actual time played hours (very generally) will it take me to get there?


In WOW people will look at your gear and /played before even considering your application to a guild. You can throw that mentalety right out the vindow here Big smile
It is true that some corps will have a SP requierment, but even these will often take you in even if you dont have X amount of SP as long as you have a good attitude. Also remember in EVE YOU get to be picky. Most corps are looking for members,thus you can pick and choose. Dont be afraid to say no to someone.
There is a thread that can help you find a corp here; https://forums.eveonline.com/default.aspx?g=posts&t=16943&find=unread

But bottom line..I would start looking for a corp right away. I know some said that EVE uni is a bad place to start but i disagree there,had some great recruits from there and no complaints. All i know is that it can take some time before they get to your application.

Dont try to rush things. EVE is a game were you can spend years and years so take your time,do what you like doing,try things that interest you and dont listen to people who say that your doing the "wrong" thing because you like mining as an exampel (or choose to never go to 0.0 again because your fed up with politics Blink )

I also know that you want to make a name for your self,but remember that in EVE this is a lot harder to do then in WOW as an example (first one to kill the new raid bosses and so on is enough to get you on some lists in WOW). Basically here there is always someone who is better,who has more ISK,is more clever, is more manipulativehas more friends in the right places..you get the idea. Dont try to become known,just try to make sure that the people you do spend time with knows who you are,and respect you as a person,not just wallet or SP.

But ending this here.. Welcome to EVE and i hope i will see you around! Smile
Tau Cabalander
Retirement Retreat
Working Stiffs
#18 - 2012-12-15 01:46:58 UTC
Starden Arnolles wrote:
I have read about Eve University and was thinking of it as the best place to start. I have not yet seen how or where to apply though.

http://wiki.eveuniversity.org/Applying_to_EVE_University

I Google'd Big smile

For what it is worth, Google tips:

  • Limit searches with the keywords "eve online" to get results from all over the Internet.
  • Limit searches using site: to get much more relevant results:

  • site:eveonline.com (all official EVE sites)
    site:forums.eveonline.com (only new forums)
    site:community.eveonline.com/ingameboard.asp (only old forums)
    site:wiki.eveonline.com (only EVELopedia)
    site:support.eveonline.com (only CCP support topics)
    site:community.eveonline.com/devblog.asp (only CCP Developer blogs)
    site:community.eveonline.com/updates/patchnotes.asp (only CCP patch notes)

You should also download and browse Industrial Sized Knowledgebase (ISK The Guide) (PDF).

Also here is a post of mine with other useful links:
https://forums.eveonline.com/default.aspx?g=posts&m=1263560#post1263560
Starden Arnolles
Wormlife Freeport Operations
Wormlife
#19 - 2012-12-16 14:02:42 UTC  |  Edited by: Starden Arnolles
This thread and the online rookie channel have been great for helping me so far as I am at about 2.5 days. There is an amazing amount to learn. But that is good imo, as I want the game to last. I am subscribed now to a date in April, and accumulating assets.

Those experienced guys and gals in the rookie channal are simply incredible. What a great thing for new players. I hope EVE Online realizes and appreciates what a positive thing those people are for this game.

One question I have is whether I should make an alt at a good market hub for marketing, etc. In WoW that was a technique I used all over, but alts are far fewer here, the market much different than the AH and I doubt we can mail anything to ourselves other than ISK. I assume we can mail ISK between our alts.

But to ask the two questions I am thinking of where it might also be good in EVE Online:

1) If I buy ISK using that alt, then that alt will receive it there at his station and most likely sell it there. Would he then be able to mail the ISK received, or part of it, to this main, or even the other alt, using the mail system?


2) Can alts (and the main) all use the same assets (like ships assuming they have the prerequisites), or are assets (other than possibly ISK that hopefully can be mailed to each other), unique to the character actually acquiring them otherwise?

I will ask these questions in the rookie channel as well, but want to be sure about this, and also, it seems like something new players might like to see answered on these forums.

Thanks in advance!
Elena Thiesant
The Scope
Gallente Federation
#20 - 2012-12-16 14:11:34 UTC
Starden Arnolles wrote:
... but alts are far fewer here


Having alts is incredibly common in EVE. Many, many people will have 2, 3 or more accounts (and that's with up to 3 characters per account)

Quote:
1) If I buy ISK using that alt, then that alt will receive it there at his station and most likely sell it there. Would he then be able to mail the ISK received, or part of it, to this main, or even the other alt, using the mail system?


No mail system. :-)

You can give ISK to anyone. Right click the person's name -> give money. That's it. Only a trial account cannot transfer ISK (but can have it transfered to them)

Quote:
2) Can alts (and the main) all use the same assets (like ships assuming they have the prerequisites), or are assets (other than possibly ISK that hopefully can be mailed to each other), unique to the character actually acquiring them otherwise?


Assets are specific to a character. My ship is my ship and none of my alts can automatically see it.

You can contract items to another character, any other character. The items don't magically move location, if you contract items in station X to your alt, when your alt accepts the contract the items are still in station X.

Only trial characters can't create contracts (though they can receive them)
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