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Scammers in my EVE Online?

First post First post
Author
Amun Doshu
Imperial Shipment
Amarr Empire
#61 - 2011-09-29 16:05:39 UTC  |  Edited by: Amun Doshu
Feligast wrote:
Lisa Eldridge wrote:
Scams are scams and anyone with common sense will see that. I've never been victim to a scam in EVE, nor any game and neither should anyone else fall victim to them. Honestly, I find it ridiculous that developers of a game promote this kind of behavior and it makes my job as a recruiter and director that much harder. Your goal was to get people to trust each other and make friendships correct? Well you keep shooting yourselves in the foot every time you talk about how great it is to ruin friendships and promote paranoia and closed groups.


You sound awfully mad. Why you so mad?


may u mad? may she touched a sensitive point of ur? she is absolute right. also i see in rl, just read some terms and contitions, its daily to scam ppl (also travelling markets, mlm and so on, there is a lot legal rl scam) i just try to leave that world to be with friends and build new friendships, but u cant trust any u dont know a long time ago. u will be scammed, killed not in battle (i was twice cos of spies, once in a 2 bill rattle). u may enjoy ur party with that few ppl, but can u really trust them or just use them as count in battle???
(before u think i dont cry for that 2 bill, i have 13+)
DeMichael Crimson
Republic University
Minmatar Republic
#62 - 2011-09-30 11:36:24 UTC
Lo Res wrote:
i once gave my credit card information to some game developers from Iceland. What?


Shocked

I laughed so hard I nearly fell out of my chair when I saw that.

In fact, some players might say that's the biggest scam of all.

Just kidding.

Roll

Anyway, all kidding aside there's a couple of other scams that should be mentioned.

If anyone says they need your full API account number to verify something, don't give it. it's a scam which could end up with your account being hacked resulting in the loss of everything.

When buying multiple items on a contract (example) like a full set of +5 Attribute Implants, always show info on each item listed even if the contract description (written by player) states 'Full set of +5 Implants' . The scam part of this is the contract will have a good price for quick sale but only 1 or 2 of the implants will actually be +5 while the rest of the implants will be +2's.

If someone in your NPC Corp chat channel says they need a loan of x amount of ISK to buy skillbooks, a Frigate, to complete a deal, etc and will repay it very soon with interest, good chance it's a scam. However, if you have plenty of ISK and can afford it, the player just might be telling the truth.


Case in point:
A few years ago a Russian speaking player in NPC corp chat asked in very broken English for 100,000 isk to complete a trade deal and would give isk reward for help. Immediately a lot of players responded with remarks like 'Go away thief' or 'Stop begging' or 'Scam' , etc. I had at the time a little over 10 million isk in my wallet and remembered when someone had helped me with a 1 million isk donation. So I decided to give the Russian 1 million isk which I mentioned in corp chat. That caused everyone else in chat channel to tell me 'Don't do it' and 'It's a scam', etc.

Next thing I know my wallet flashed and the Russian gave 900,000 of the 1 mill isk back to me. I then gave it back to him. He returned it back to me again. I then gave it back to him again. I told everyone in corp chat what was happening and they were telling me to stop or give it to them, etc.. The Russian then linked my name in the chat channel with some Russian words typed in very large bold capital letters. Someone said they couldn't read Russian but they could tell that he was mad.

About 10 minutes later my wallet flashed again, the Russian had now placed 10 million isk into it with a message - 'Reward'. I told the channel members what happened and then linked his name in chat with a salute o7. He then replied with a smile and salute :) o7. The rest of the channel members couldn't believe it. A lot of them said I was lucky. I was just trying to do some good will help. I didn't expect anything in return and ended up with about 20 mill in my wallet, doubling what I already had.

But my story doesn't stop there.

About a week after that, a new player in NPC corp chat channel said he had over 10 billion isk on his main character and was leaving Eve. Said he wanted to help out new players and would double the amount of isk anyone gave him. Since I had a bunch of isk (+20 mill), I did a personal convo with him and after he assured me he would double it, gave him 15 mill isk. After he got my isk, he closed the personal chat and continued posting his 'Double your ISK - Leaving EVE' message in NPC corp chat. I tried to do personal chat again but he wouldn't accept. I then realized I had been scammed for 15 million isk.

I told everyone about it in NPC corp chat. One of the other channel members told me thanks for the info cuz he was just about to give the guy 10 mill isk. A couple members said I just learned a very good lesson about Eve - Never trust anyone - and - If it sounds too good to be true, then it is - Other members started linking the guys name with 'Thief' and 'Scammer' next to it. This caused the guy to log out from the game. Man was I bummed out. After talking to a couple of corp members in private convo, I learned some info about tracking players. I added the scammer to my contact list with -10 standing and placed him on watch list. I also learned about Locator Agents. A couple of hours later the scammer logged back into the game.

I used a Locator Agent to find out where he was and set destination. I arrived in system to see he was running the same 'Leaving Eve' scam in local chat. I immediately started telling local chat that it was a scam and the guy was a thief. I spammed local chat - linked his name with 'Scammer' - He left the system and I warped around jumping into all connected systems till I saw him in local chat again where I continued doing the same thing, linking his name with 'Scammer' next to it. Again he left system and again I jumped around til I found him and started spamming my message in local chat again. He then logged out of the game again.

There was no way I was going to let this slide. I was pretty much online about 20 hours a day, tracking the scammer and spamming local chat with my message. Anytime the scammer came online, I was in system ready and waiting to do my thing - link his name with 'Scammer' next to it in local chat. If he traveled to another system, I would follow. This went on for a few days. I was bound and determined to ruin any chance of him scamming other players. Eventually the guy placed 15 mill isk back into my wallet with a mail message saying 'Leave me alone'.

I saw him log in and out of the game for a few more days after that. I think after his trial period was done, the character was bio-massed. I never did get 'Double' the isk amount. That was the first time I was ever scammed in Eve and hopefully it's the last time as well.

If you see other players in local chat saying they got double isk from so and so, they are either alts or friends of the scammer, all of them trying to get your hard earned isk.
malaire
#63 - 2011-09-30 14:51:25 UTC
DeMichael Crimson wrote:
If anyone says they need your full API account number to verify something, don't give it. it's a scam which could end up with your account being hacked resulting in the loss of everything.

This is not true. The numeric "User ID" used with old API keys can't be used to hack the account and it is safe to give it away.

I believe there is no use for just that "User ID" alone. It is used with old limited and full API keys, but alone that "User ID" is useless and can't be used for anything.

New to EVE? Don't forget to read: The Manual * The Wiki * The Career Options * and everything else

Yuuki Musashi
Madoff Securities
#64 - 2011-10-01 15:33:30 UTC
I feel compelled to speak up for proper, decent scammers. Not all of us are spamming Jita local with mis-labelled contracts. A noble handful of us are hardworking grifters running sophisticated confidence games, hustling ISK day in and day out to finance the endless war against Goons and Russian botters to keep Delve and Period Basis safe for decent people.

Rest assured, gentle victim, the billion ISK you just paid me for something that was worth a tenth of that is going to a good cause. (After I buy another PLEX and faction-fit my new Archon, of course)

P.S. Block this toon if it makes you feel better, but it won't do you any good. Getting your ISK is the easy part, counting it all...that's hard. Pirate
Hamster Too
Golden Fowl
#65 - 2011-10-02 13:22:37 UTC
Anshio Tamark wrote:
I once saw an auction-contract scam. It seemed legit enough and all. "Cheap Hulk with equipment and rigs, starting price 170mil". To anyone, that might seem cheap. When I clicked it, though, I noticed that the "Hulk" in question was actually just a Covetor, which is only worth 17mil at most. And to make it worse, that auction had about 5 other bids, with the price raised to about 200mil. People obviously didn't check what they bought.


Those multiple bids were most likely placed by the scammer's alts in effort to make the auction look legitimate.

Starting with a low initial price, inflating it with a few bids (double digit number of bids can be seen quite often in Jita) makes the auction look "real" to unwary and appears to be the latest fad in scamming.
Iorakian Delthar
Garoun Investment Bank
Gallente Federation
#66 - 2011-10-03 05:19:31 UTC
Pak Narhoo wrote:
I've been playing EVE for almost 4 years now on 2 accounts, I've never been scammed.
Until last Saturday.

1: Greed is *not* good.
2: If it looks too good to be true it usually is.
3: If no-one else reacts upon this "offer you cannot resist", scratch your own skull why you should.


In short, I just bought 1 GTC, converted it to 2 PLEX then saw an "offer" in local for a contract:
buy 1 PLEX, only 320Mil, need skill books and I was like, 'hey, I can make 60 mil profit on this'.

The contract stated:
- YOU WILL PAY: 320.000.000 ISK (320 Million)
- YOU WILL GET: 30 Day Pilot's License Extention (PLEX) x 1


I lost: 320 mil.

Somewhere in the fine print it also included me to pay with a PLEX and I didn't see it.
After 3 times going over the contract. Roll



I had a look at that one too a few times trying to work out where the scam was, until I read it in this forum a while ago (about the 3rd or 4th post in).
Kara Books
Deal with IT.
#67 - 2011-10-10 12:57:36 UTC
malaire wrote:
Most scams are allowed in EVE but few are not:
ILLEGAL scamming

Character Bazaar-channel is used for selling characters for ISK. Scams relating to this are not allowed.

Buddy invites and rewards from other players-topic has buddy-invite offers from paying players. Scams relating to this are not allowed.

To protect new players, canbaiting/canflipping is not allowed in 24 Rookie Systems. (Article only mentions canflipping but I understand that canbaiting is also not allowed.)

Buying or selling ISK/items/characters for real money is not allowed. (However you can buy PLEX with real money from official site and sell it for ISK in-game.)

Botting or client modification is not allowed. So while you can post your contract-scam to local-chat manually every 5 minutes, you are not allowed to use a bot to automatically paste that text to local-chat every 5 minutes.

Scamming is not allowed in some chat channels. I know that "Help" and "Rookie-Help" chat channels don't allow scamming.

Excessive spamming in local-chat is not allowed. I don't know exact rules for this, but if I remember correctly one scammer told me that you can repost once every minute or after 5 other posts (whichever happens first). But I have not confirmed this.


Botting is not allowed but there is nothing in there about using Macro's, programs that manually move the mouse around simulating a humans hand movement, if CCP actually cared, they would have long banned it all.
malaire
#68 - 2011-10-10 13:04:12 UTC
Kara Books wrote:
Botting is not allowed but there is nothing in there about using Macro's, programs that manually move the mouse around simulating a humans hand movement, if CCP actually cared, they would have long banned it all.

I believe that such macros are not allowed either. Actually they are just simple bots.

New to EVE? Don't forget to read: The Manual * The Wiki * The Career Options * and everything else

CCP Zymurgist
C C P
C C P Alliance
#69 - 2011-10-10 14:34:33 UTC
malaire wrote:
Kara Books wrote:
Botting is not allowed but there is nothing in there about using Macro's, programs that manually move the mouse around simulating a humans hand movement, if CCP actually cared, they would have long banned it all.

I believe that such macros are not allowed either. Actually they are just simple bots.


That is correct. According to the EULA,

"You may not use macros or other stored rapid keystrokes or other patterns of play that facilitate acquisition of items, currency, objects, character attributes, rank or status at an accelerated rate when compared with ordinary Game play. You may not rewrite or modify the user interface or otherwise manipulate data in any way to acquire items, currency, objects, character attributes or beneficial actions not actually acquired or achieved in the Game."

So if you manually scam someone of their ISKs you won't be violating that rule!

Zymurgist Community Representative CCP NA, EVE Online Contact Us at http://support.eveonline.com/pages/petitions/createpetition.aspx

Khanh'rhh
Sparkle Motion.
#70 - 2011-10-10 14:45:18 UTC
Where does the EULA stand on scamming for out-of-game (but related) services?

If I tell someone I am going to host a killboard for them, and the agreed payment is a PLEX, what would be the repercussions on myself for not delivering on it?

I saw someone offering exactly this service, and scamming for it, and it struck me as being a bit "off" - not least because there are no in-game mechanisms for detecting or acting on the scam.

"Do not touch anything unnecessarily. Beware of pretty girls in dance halls and parks who may be spies, as well as bicycles, revolvers, uniforms, arms, dead horses, and men lying on roads -- they are not there accidentally." -Soviet infantry manual,

Charlie Tan
Charlie Tan's Intergalactic Trading Service
#71 - 2011-10-10 16:14:49 UTC
Id just like to thank the guy that paid me 2.1 billion for some broken integrity response nodes yesterday. All your hard work and effort gathering that together has paid for my new slave set, so it wont go to waste :)
Ms sellsalot
Viziam
Amarr Empire
#72 - 2011-10-10 16:22:57 UTC
I have one thing to say about all this....Thank you Jita....thank you very muchTwisted
Caldari Citizen5547851
ZOMB MY CORP
#73 - 2011-10-10 16:25:02 UTC  |  Edited by: Caldari Citizen5547851
My thanx are going to 9 pilots whom ive scammed this week.I really thank u for these 15bils.I didnt have enough money to fit my 3d titan but now Im satisfied.
I really cant help scamming.Its like a drug and i really fill frustrated when my buy orders are kicked.
p.s see ya in Jita.Happy scamming
malaire
#74 - 2011-10-10 16:53:49 UTC
Caldari Citizen5547851 wrote:
i really fill frustrated when my buy orders are kicked.

Thank you for telling that. I really like collecting rare items and using them to remove fake buy orders from market. After this I'm going to like it even more. Big smile

New to EVE? Don't forget to read: The Manual * The Wiki * The Career Options * and everything else

Yuuki Musashi
Madoff Securities
#75 - 2011-10-11 09:40:45 UTC  |  Edited by: Yuuki Musashi
Caldari Citizen5547851 wrote:

I really cant help scamming.Its like a drug


*fistbump*

I hear that. It's like heroin, 1-2 hits and you're hooked for life. I prefer to think of it as 'Market PVP.'

Never. Stop. Scamming.

interesting edit, CCP....how about 'white horse'?
GM Lelouch
Game Masters
C C P Alliance
#76 - 2011-10-12 03:20:40 UTC
Khanh'rhh wrote:
Where does the EULA stand on scamming for out-of-game (but related) services?

If I tell someone I am going to host a killboard for them, and the agreed payment is a PLEX, what would be the repercussions on myself for not delivering on it?

I saw someone offering exactly this service, and scamming for it, and it struck me as being a bit "off" - not least because there are no in-game mechanisms for detecting or acting on the scam.


Tl;dr: We don't like scams of this sort, don't do it!

Players who find themselves scammed in this manner should petition immediately to have the matter looked into, reporting the incident weeks or months after the fact will likely not amount to much as we naturally cannot reliably determine whether the service was provided in the past.

No, you'll not get away with the scam by stalling the buyer for some time with promises that the service will be ready in a few days. The payment should not be rendered by the buyer until the seller is ready to start providing the advertised service. As a legitimate seller, do not accept payment for the service unless you‘re ready to start providing it within a few hours.

The scammer should at the very least expect to have the proceeds of the scam removed. A warning or even temporary/permanent account suspensions could apply based on the situation at hand/the scammer's track record. There are plenty of ways to scam in EVE without breaking the game rules, sticking to those methods will ward off any potential trouble.

Finally, for maximum accountability, transactions involving out-of-game services such as killboard/voice chat server hosting should be negotiated through the sell orders section of these forums. It goes without saying that this should not be taken as a free pass to conduct scams of this sort outside of these forums.

Best regards, Lead GM Lelouch CCP Customer Support | EVE Online | DUST 514

Gogela
The Conference Elite
CODE.
#77 - 2011-10-31 19:43:28 UTC
GM Lelouch wrote:
Khanh'rhh wrote:
Where does the EULA stand on scamming for out-of-game (but related) services?

If I tell someone I am going to host a killboard for them, and the agreed payment is a PLEX, what would be the repercussions on myself for not delivering on it?

I saw someone offering exactly this service, and scamming for it, and it struck me as being a bit "off" - not least because there are no in-game mechanisms for detecting or acting on the scam.


Tl;dr: We don't like scams of this sort, don't do it!

Players who find themselves scammed in this manner should petition immediately to have the matter looked into, reporting the incident weeks or months after the fact will likely not amount to much as we naturally cannot reliably determine whether the service was provided in the past.

No, you'll not get away with the scam by stalling the buyer for some time with promises that the service will be ready in a few days. The payment should not be rendered by the buyer until the seller is ready to start providing the advertised service. As a legitimate seller, do not accept payment for the service unless you‘re ready to start providing it within a few hours.

The scammer should at the very least expect to have the proceeds of the scam removed. A warning or even temporary/permanent account suspensions could apply based on the situation at hand/the scammer's track record. There are plenty of ways to scam in EVE without breaking the game rules, sticking to those methods will ward off any potential trouble.

Finally, for maximum accountability, transactions involving out-of-game services such as killboard/voice chat server hosting should be negotiated through the sell orders section of these forums. It goes without saying that this should not be taken as a free pass to conduct scams of this sort outside of these forums.


As a side note - it should be noted that out-of-game scams are, by their very nature, out-of-game. That makes it a real world scam. In the real world, the re-spawn timer is a bit** and there are some very real world consequences for conducting them.

Signatures should be used responsibly...

Maaliki Khashour
Hedion University
Amarr Empire
#78 - 2011-11-01 01:26:54 UTC
Marc W2048 wrote:
I am more than aware that society in general does not condone scamming and that it is illegal. However we allow idiots to dump coffee on thier laps and sue people for thier own stupidity.


1. Spilling a drink has nothing to do with intelligence. Perhaps you have never spilled a drink, hot or cold, in your life, but it happens to people for a wide number of reasons that have little to do with intelligence. Now, if Liebeck had made the choice to drive a car while holding a hot cup of coffee, that would have been stupidity, but she was the passenger in a parked car when she spilled it. This matters because the trial that followed determined she was 20% responsible for being burned.

That means that McDonald's was found 80% responsible. Why? Because of the choices people within the corporation made.

2. McDonald's policy was to serve the coffee at 180-190 degrees F. Not only is this hotter than other major coffee providers (Starbucks and Dunkin's) but prior to the incident with Liebeck, McDonald's had over 700 complaints about people being scalded by their coffee and had already paid over $500,000 in damages.

McDonald's made the choice to serve a product it knew could cause injuries because the price of paying people off was easier than changing its existing policy. This is a choice many companies make. Recalls, re-training, and replacing equipment cost money. For a company as large as McDonald's, it can literally cost them millions.

3. Liebeck suffered third-degree burns, permanent scarring, and required skin grafts. The representative for McDonald's admitted that he knew this was a possible consequence of its coffee spilling on someone but also that the average consumer would not be aware of this.

Negligence often involves the idea of the reasonable person. A reasonable person expects to suffer some burns when a cup of coffee hits their lap, but not for their genitals to fuse to their inner thigh.

4. Liebeck initially asked for $20,000 and was refused. Recall that McDonald's previously just paid off medical costs but this particular franchise owner decided that he or she would only pay $800. Again, that's a choice. McDonald's could have avoided a trial altogether with one $20,000 check.

5. McDonald's legal strategy was to admit to all wrong doing and then say they had more important things to worry about. Seriously. If you want to talk about stupidity, look at the lawyers for the defense and their witnesses.

_What do I care for your suffering? Pain, even agony, is no more than information before the senses -- data fed to the computer of the mind. The lesson is simple: you have received the information, now act on it. Take control of the input and you shall become master of the output. _

Jark Vohaul
Sebiestor Tribe
Minmatar Republic
#79 - 2011-11-01 14:50:01 UTC
What great tips! Definitely bookmarking this thread.
Cerisia
Loyal Fortune
#80 - 2011-11-03 01:06:25 UTC
Jark Vohaul wrote:
What great tips! Definitely bookmarking this thread.



In my humble opinion this thread could do with being made a sticky!!
This space for rent..